Western Libraries Display Case Exhibits

Library Case 1 - see map

Western Sustainability

Western Washington University strives to be a national leader in campus sustainability.

From our commitment to renewable energy and waste reduction to sustainability-minded courses and Western's Sustainability Committee, WWU incorporates sustainability into many areas of campus operations and academics.



Sustainability is part of the mission and strategic plan of Western Washington University.

Western Sustainability


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Display By:
Carol Berry
URL for more information:
Library Case 2 - see map

sweat•er [swet-er] noun

Outer garment, usually knitted or crocheted, that is worn on the upper part of the body. Often made of wool, a renewable resource that protects against the cold even when damp

About Sweater Days

Think of your sweater as a portable personal heater you don't plug in.

68° is the target thermostat setting in campus buildings. That can seem warm or cold, depending on the time of day, sunshine factor, your level of activity. Layering clothing is the recommended way to keep the thermostat steady, while staying comfortable throughout the day.

Sweater Days is an environmentally friendly, economically viable, socially equitable and healthy energy conservation awareness and action campaign. Everyone is invited to keep university energy consumption and costs lower during the winter months.

Sustainability is warm, functional, fun, and in style!

Contact: Carol Berry, Campus Conservation Program Manager,

carol.berry@wwu.edu, (360)650-7979


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Display By:
Carol Berry
URL for more information:
Library Case 3 - see map

Mongolia Days - Western's longstanding commitment to Mongolian Studies education is exemplified by Western Libraries' unparalleled collection of Mongolian materials.  You are invited to join special guests from Mongolia on May 5th and 6th for a series of programs designed to highlight and celebrate the Mongolia Collection at Western Libraries, Western's partnership with Mongolian universities, and Western's community connections.

Sponsored by: Western Libraries, Woodring College of Education, Center for East Asian Studies, and Center for International Studies.

Mongolia Days Programs are made possible through generous support from Henry G. Schwarz, John C. Street, and Susan Bradbury.

 


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Display By:
Wayne Richter and Clarissa Mansfield
Library Case 4 - see map

AN EMOTIONAL YOUNG PERSON JUST LIKE YOURSELF

 

AN EXHIBITION BY WESTON HORNER

           

I have many questions and insecurities I struggle with in my work. My questions revolve around how art and society interact, and examining "common sense" especially in regards to money and education. How much time we get to be in an educational system versus how much of our lives we try to function in an economic system is a puzzling proportion to me. My work means to demonstrate our shared responsibility to continuously reform ourselves and how that privilege to think sprouts opportunities for learning and sharing thoughts regardless of any social status.


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Display By:
Weston Horner
Library Case 5 - see map

AN EMOTIONAL YOUNG PERSON JUST LIKE YOURSELF

 

AN EXHIBITION BY WESTON HORNER

           

I have many questions and insecurities I struggle with in my work. My questions revolve around how art and society interact, and examining "common sense" especially in regards to money and education. How much time we get to be in an educational system versus how much of our lives we try to function in an economic system is a puzzling proportion to me. My work means to demonstrate our shared responsibility to continuously reform ourselves and how that privilege to think sprouts opportunities for learning and sharing thoughts regardless of any social status.


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Display By:
Weston Horner
Library Case 6 - see map

Western Washington University and Western Libraries will host Lisa Marcus and Kirsten Christenson from Pacific Lutheran University from 4-5:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 23 in VU 565A as they present “Collaborating Across Disciplines:  Holocaust and Genocide Studies at PLU.”

In this two-part talk, Marcus and Christensen will discuss several features of Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Pacific Lutheran University.

Marcus will describe a project bringing together students and faculty from English, History and Religion to explore the implications of cultural critic Theodor Adorno’s famous claim that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.” The Poetry After Auschwitz Project resulted in several public presentations, a meaningful exchange among students and faculty across disciplines, and was recently published in the Reform Jewish Quarterly.

Christensen will discuss key features of the development of PLU’s new academic minor in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, inaugurated last fall. She will describe the collaborative development of the program mission statement and syllabus for the introductory course, and will also explain the program’s commitment to team teaching, a value that underscores the inherent interdisciplinarity of the academic study of the Holocaust and other genocides.

Christensen is an associate professor of German at PLU, where she teaches all levels of German language and culture. She is part of the faculty group that designed PLU’s new program in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and team-taught the first iteration of the introductory course in fall 2014. She also served on the organizing committee for this year’s Powell-Heller Conference in Holocaust Education.

Lisa Marcus is an associate professor of English and a founding member of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program at PLU. Among her recent publications are “‘The Holocaust Without Smoke’:  Irena Klepfisz’s ‘Bashert’” and a poem,“I did not lose my father at Auschwitz,” in the Poetry After Auschwitz Forum.

For more information on this event contact Jeanne Armstrong at (360) 650-7667 orJeanne.armstrong@wwu.edu.


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Display By:
Jeanne Armstrong
Library Case 7 - see map

April is National Poetry Month!

Take time to enjoy a poem or two or three!

Inaugurated by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month, held every April, is the largest literary celebration in the world with schools, publishers, libraries, booksellers, and poets celebrating poetry’s vital place in our culture.


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Display By:
Amy Sedovic
URL for more information:
Library Case 8 - see map

Welcome to Summer Session

Summer @ Western provides the opportunity for students to stick to their graduation timeline by catching up on credits or trying to improve grades in courses. With accelerated courses (six-week or nine-week) students are able to work on credits while still having time to enjoy summer. Campus during summer has a different vibe – it is mellow, but still a hub of activity. 

Classes tend to be smaller during the summer, which means students have more access to professors and get to know their classmates. All the campus resources are available too, but with less people clamoring for their place in line. By taking face-to-face classes and online classes, students are able to save money and earn more credits.

Western is a beautiful campus and spending time here during the summer is a bonus – students can read in between classes at Fisher Fountain or have a study session on Old Main lawn. Bellingham provides a dazzling summer – students can study at Boulevard Park, take in a free concert with Downtown Sounds, or spend a Saturday discovering the bountiful harvest at the Farmer’s Market.

Even if students have to leave Bellingham for the summer, WesternOnline provides courses for students to catch up on credits.


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Display By:
Courtney Hiatt
URL for more information:
Mathes Figurine Exhibit - see map

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832 - 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, photographer, and illustrator   This display case features "Alice", a Mathes Reading Figurine, plus a selection of Western Libraries' books written about Lewis Carroll and his works.


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Display By:
Pattie Moon