2014-2015 James W. Scott Research Fellowships

Western Washington University's Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS) welcomes applications for the James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships, awarded in honor of a founder and first Director of CPNWS, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. Up to $1000 is available in 2014-2015 to scholars who propose to undertake significant research using archival holdings at CPNWS. Applications are accepted from individuals in graduate programs (and/or who are new to the field of historical research and writing), as well as individuals who have finished the Ph.D. and/or are published authors.

Fellowship Requirements

  • Fellows will be expected to spend approximately one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence prior to September 1, 2015.
  • Fellows will be asked to give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit.
  • Fellows will be asked to provide a brief (300-500 word) written statement describing their research.

Applications

Applications must be submitted via mail or electronically and should include:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic
  • Two letters of recommendation

Applications are generally reviewed during Fall Quarter. Please contact CPNWS Archivist Ruth Steele (Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu) for more information. CPNWS is a program of Western Libraries Heritage Resources.

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Medieval Manuscripts Support Learning

Professor Katie Vulić has been bringing her medieval literature classes to Western Libraries Special Collections ever since she first began teaching at Western. For the first several years, Vulić taught students exclusively from copies of original works; Special Collections owns a number of facsimile reproductions of medieval manuscripts that helped her students gain an understanding of the original context and culture of their class texts.

At the same time that she was using these facsimile materials, Vulić was also very interested in finding an opportunity to introduce original materials into her courses so that her students could engage directly with original manuscripts and learn from them firsthand about medieval literary culture.

“One of the goals in using original manuscripts is for students to recognize how hugely different their reading practices are between reading mass-produced, cheap, clean texts versus hard-to-produce medieval luxury goods, the kind where every letter written is its own work of art,”  explained Vulić. "Additionally, with the facsimile materials, I could say ‘Here is what is known, here is what has already been discovered.’ With the original materials, I can do that too, but then I can also come back and ask, ‘What can we learn from these materials that is not yet known? What are the differences between medieval reading practices and our own?’”

Last year, Vulić was able to pose these questions to some of her graduate students after she made arrangements to borrow some original manuscript fragments and incunables (early printed books) from Washington State University’s Special Collections for her class to use. These materials were kept in Western Libraries Special Collections, and her graduate students were then able to spend a number of hours over a two-week period working directly with the borrowed materials.

“I had them go the whole nine yards with the manuscript fragments: transcribe passages, prepare a thorough description of their features, and check the existing databases in order to identify what they were. Students did say it was a lot of work but they also really enjoyed it and said I should keep the project going,” stated Vulić.

Though all of the medieval items loaned from Washington State were just individual leaves of parchment separated from their full original manuscripts, students can learn a lot from scraps and fragments. “If a book was taken apart like that, it was often because it was considered commonplace, outdated, or not valuable. Old manuscripts could be used for scrap, or for reinforcing the binding of other more current books. What that means is most of the scraps we can afford and that we see tend to be in Latin and church-related, but one advantage of that is they also tend to be searchable,” explained Vulić.

While some of the manuscript fragments have cataloged information as part of their records, other fragments have very little documented information accompanying them. However, for the fragments that are not searchable, there is still a lot that can be discovered.

“It’s hard to make a huge discovery in just one day, but sometimes we could use context clues to figure things out. And students come away with a real appreciation for the unique methods, challenges and experiences of this profession. They also gain firsthand experience with archival practices and discovering something ‘new’ in an archive, sometimes even contributing quite a lot to existing knowledge. Students are surprised by how hard these materials are to read, but they seem to have a lot of fun with it, as if they are working out puzzles. It’s an opportunity that undergraduates don’t usually have—a chance for them to see and interact with materials that are usually kept behind glass.”

This experience with her graduate students made her think of piloting a similar project in her undergraduate classes, and one year later,  Dean of Western Libraries Mark Greenberg helped facilitate another loan of original materials from a rare book dealer with whom he has worked in the past.

Vulić has since used these original manuscript fragments this past quarter in two of her undergraduate classes. She synthesized the highlights of what her graduate class did over a two week period into two days, and Vulić thinks her classes have enjoyed the experience. She noted that access to these materials gives students an enhanced sense of the culture, can correct misinformation from movies, video games, and popular culture, and can help students become more grounded in the time period from which the pieces were produced, while simultaneously creating opportunities for interaction with the original materials about which there might not be a lot of known information.

Vulić explained that while she wished Western Libraries would someday have its own collection of original manuscripts, she also wanted her colleagues to know about the resources available to them that Western Libraries can help provide. She stated that she is always surprised when she meets someone who teaches at Western who has not visited Special Collections.

“It would be lovely if more of our colleagues would take advantage of these resources. I have found it to be fantastic working with library staff. They are always so willing to work with me and to meet my teaching needs. They have always been the best partners in just the best possible ways. I cannot say enough good things about them. For faculty thinking about setting up a new class and using some of these resources, it may take a little work to get things going, but it will be worth it in the long run, and you will always get the support you need from the library!” 

Rare Books at Western Libraries

Many students and grads spend ample time in Western Libraries, unaware that it is home to a Rare Book Collection with some rather eclectic treasures lingering on the uppermost floor. Rare Books are housed in a climate-controlled storage facility on the 6th floor of the Wilson Library, adjacent to a well-lit, comfortable reading and research room.

Western Libraries seeks to increase both size and awareness of the collection, and has recently formed an advisory group comprised of faculty from the library and several other departments. This group will guide future purchases and acquisitions, assist in identifying donors, and perhaps most importantly, help integrate the collection into the University’s curriculum. The collection’s scope includes art books, regional letterpress and small press, 19th century women’s literature and children’s literature.

Recent acquisitions include an edition of Jorge Luis Borges Book of Sand with woodcuts by local artist Tom Wood. The uniqueness and multidimensionality (book as text, book as object, book as art) of works like this make them rich in teaching and research opportunities. The Rare Book Collection also boasts a luxurious facsimile of Ellesmere’s Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, original journals of Vancouver, Cook and Lewis and Clark, and numerous rare works of art and literature.

Western Washington is home to several nationally renowned letterpresses that produce books of exceptional quality. Presses like Copper Canyon, Co-op, Brooding Heron, Grey Spider, Wood Works, Egress Studio Press and others are creating books that by their choice of paper, type, binding, size, and content are themselves works of art. Western’s evolving rare book criteria have been enhanced to include vigorous collection of such items. These are often extremely small print runs that go out of stock quickly, and are often poorly preserved. Preserving these books and making them available for instruction are two of the primary goals.

Rare books located in the general circulating shelves are being discovered and relocated into the Rare Book Collection where handling and climate can be regulated. Anyone  who would like to help grow this collection either through gifts that include books that fit our collecting criteria, or through monetary donations may contact Paul Piper at 360-650-3097 or paul.piper@wwu.edu.

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Heritage Resources contributes to "Grit" exhibit at Seattle's Wing Luke Museum

Western Libraries Heritage Resources is pleased to be a Project Contributor on a new exhibition from the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle, WA. The exhibit, entitled Grit: Asian Pacific Pioneers Across the Northwest, “uncovers the true stories of the men and women who migrated to the region from the Asia Pacific,” and “reminds us of Asian Pacific Americans’ long history of fortitude and resilience as they established communities in the Pacific Northwest.” One of the featured stories is that of Lummi/Hawaiian fiddler Charley Kahana and the exhibit includes images of Kahana drawn from the Howard E. Buswell collection at Heritage Resources’ own Center for Pacific Northwest Studies.

Grit poster

Grit opened on December 12, 2013 and runs through October 19, 2014. The Wing Luke is a Smithsonian Affiliate in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution

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Heritage Resources offers Directed Independent Study

Western Libraries Heritage Resources offers an exciting opportunity for highly motivated and intellectually curious students to pursue an in-depth course of study that is not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Through independent study students have an opportunity to conduct research in primary and secondary sources such as manuscripts, archives, and rare books managed by the University Archives, Library Special Collections, and/or the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Project proposals may involve the creation of an online exhibit, documentary film, archival finding aid, annotated bibliography, biography, specialized curriculum or specialized teaching/learning tools, a research paper, or other topics or resources as proposed. A prospectus/plan for the work should be submitted in advance of registration.  

Independent study proposals are developed in consultation with a WWU full-time faculty member and/or the Director of Heritage Resources. Interested students should begin consulting with their faculty mentors well in advance in order to develop a feasible project proposal. Priority will be given to thoughtful, structured topics that are not offered elsewhere in the undergraduate or graduate curriculum. Independent study requires that students design their own courses, create their own syllabi, and work closely with faculty mentors. Supervising professors will donate a great deal of time and effort, so students applying for independent study should be similarly committed to the project. Students must be in residence in order to undertake independent study projects. A three-credit independent study should involve at least one hour of student-faculty contact plus an additional eight hours of work per week.  It is also possible to elect two or four credit hours with appropriate changes in workload. The number of candidates accepted each quarter will vary, based on available resources and supervisory capacity.

To apply: 

  • Pick up a Directed Independent Study Permit from Connie Mallison in the Library Administration Office, 231 Haggard Hall. 
  • Working with your faculty member and member of the Heritage Resources staff, complete the permit form and attach a one-page abstract that describes goals and objectives of the Independent Study,  the desired projected learning outcomes and your qualifications to undertake the proposed project, any required resources, the expectations of the faculty supervisor, and  proposed evaluation criteria.
  • Submit your proposal to the Director of Heritage Resources and your faculty mentor for final approval.
  • Have the supervising faculty member sign the application permit.  The student will submit the permit form to the Registrar.

All proposals submitted by the Add/Drop deadline will be considered.

Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
Recommendation of an instructor from the student’s department; permission from the chair of student’s department and the Director of Heritage Resources.

For additional information, please contact Elizabeth Joffrion, Director of Heritage Resources, Western Libraries (360-650-3283 or Elizabeth.Joffrion@wwu.edu ).

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Dr. Polly Myers, James W. Scott award recipient

Beth Joffrion and Polly Myers

Polly Myers, a recipient of the 2012-2013 James W. Scott Research Fellowship Award, was the guest of honor at a reception in Special Collections, on Monday, November 26.

 Dr. Meyers is a History Instructor at Western and is researching the employment of women at the Boeing Company after World War II.  

The fellowships are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, founder and first director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region.

Elizabeth Joffrion, Director of Heritage Resources, congratulated Dr. Myers on receiving the award and invited the guests to return in Spring 2013, when Dr. Myers will present on the topic of anti-nuclear protest.

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2012-2013 James W. Scott Fellowship Recipients

Western Libraries’ Heritage Resources is delighted to announce the recipients of the 2012-2013 James W. Scott Research Fellowship Awards. The fellowships are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. Awards are granted to two scholars who will undertake significant research in the historical collections of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Special Collections or the WWU Archives and Records Center.

The Senior Fellow for 2012-13 is Dr. Polly Myers. Dr. Myers is a History Instructor at Western Washington University. She is presently conducting research about the employment of women at the Boeing Company in the postwar period, and has a secondary project examining women’s roles in anti-nuclear protest in the Pacific Northwest. Dr. Myers will be in residence during Fall 2012, and will deliver a presentation on the topic of anti-nuclear protest in Spring 2013.

The Junior Fellowship has been awarded to Dr. Mary Erickson, an Instructor in the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication. Dr. Erickson is expected to be in residence on Western's campus in Spring or Summer 2013, and will pursue research about the history of audio-visual media production in the Pacific Northwest.

We offer hearty congratulations to both Fellows, and look forward to welcoming them to campus. For more information, please contact Heritage Resources at Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

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Steven Garfinkle presentation in Special Collections

Steven GarfinkleThe Western Libraries Reading Series invited Professor Steven Garfinkle, WWU History Department, to present his new book, Entrepreneurs and Enterprise in Early Mesopotamia: a study of three archives from the Third Dynasty of Ur.  The presentation was in Special Collection's Research Room, on Tuesday, Nov. 13.  

Steven Garfinkle discussed the role played by entrepreneurs from four thousand years ago and their role in the economy at that time.  

He studied thousands of clay tablets with cuneiform writing on them to gather evidence for the book, which is available in the library's circulating collection.

Entrepeneurs and Enterprise in Early Mesopotamia

More books by Steven Garfinkle in Western Libraries

 

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Western Connections: Western Front Goes Digital, 110 Years of History

Peter Smith and Marian Alexander Marian Alexander, Head of Special Collections Emeritus, and Peter Smith, Special Collections Librarian, gave a presentation about the Western Front Historical Collection at the Village Books lunch time series, Western Connections, on October 9, 2012. 

Marian began the presentation by offering a view of historical Bellingham in 1899 when the student newspaper began.  From the first issue of the Normal Messenger, she compared the newspaper text, "graceful terraces" of Sehome hill, with historical photographs that revealed a rough landscape.  Marian also described the complete process of digitization from the planning stages to the final product. 

Peter displayed search strategies and helpful tips about using the Western Front Historical Collection.  There was a brief question and answer session following the presentation. 

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Celebrate Archives Month in Oct.

Three women fish cannery workers standing on a building roof top. Back caption: 'Aunt Clara & friends on top of P.A.F. roof." & Clara Weaver, Florence Pettibone, Carrie Salvo.' (GB465)

Clara Weaver, Florence Pettibone, and Carrie Salvo on Pacific American Fisheries roof. (GB465)

Western Libraries Heritage Resources invites you to celebrate our rich documentary heritage by participating in a range of FREE events we're offering throughout the month:

  • “Western Front Goes Digital: 110 Years of History” – Tuesday, October 9, 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Village Books in Fairhaven (part of Village Books’ Western Connections series)
  • Basics of Historical Research Workshop – Saturday, October 20, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Goltz-Murray Building (in partnership with the Washington State Archives, Northwest Branch)
  • 2nd Annual Pecha-Kucha Presentation Event – Monday, October 22, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Goltz-Murray Building (for History and Archival graduate students and Archives/Records Management professionals) 
  • History Day Teachers’ Workshop – Tuesday, October 23, 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Goltz-Murray Building (for educators interested in participating in National History Day)
  • Open House – Saturday, October 27, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Goltz-Murray Building and Wilson Library 6th Floor (part of WWU’s Fall Family Open House)

We hope to see you at some of these events! Contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu or see event flyer for more details.

Archival Photos Document Lower Baker River Dam Construction

The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies is delighted to make available a collection of almost 1500 images documenting the construction of the Lower Baker River Dam north of Concrete, Washington. See here for online images.

downstream face of Lower Baker RIver Dam 1925Downstream face of the Lower Baker River Dam, December 6, 1925. (#LBDC1576)

Completed in 1925, the dam is part of the Baker River Hydroelectric Project that formed Baker Lake and Lake Shannon and which is operated by Puget Sound Energy (The Upper Baker Dam lies nine miles upstream, and was constructed in 1959).

The original photographs, transferred to CPNWS in February 2012, are well-traveled. They were shot by the superintendent of the construction project, George P. Jessup, and document the day-to-day process of construction on the dam during 1924 and 1925. Jessup and his family later moved across the United States as he worked on other engineering projects, and the collection traveled with them. The images were eventually donated by Jessup's daughter, Nancy Underwood, to the Coffee County Historical Society in Manchester, Tennesee, whose staff took steps to research and transfer the collection back to its origins: The collection was delivered first to the editor of the Concrete Herald, and then to the custody of the Concrete Heritage Museum Association.

Museum Board members pursued a successful collaboration with Puget Sound Energy (present owners of the dam), who funded a project to catalog, preserve and create digital copies of the images. Reference copies are now available for visitors to the Concrete Heritage Museum. The original images and digital copies are now housed and accessible at WWU's Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Emma Darmody, an intern and graduate student in WWU's Archives and Records Management Program, readied content for this digital collection hosted on the ContentDM platform.

Related holdings at CPNWS include records of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company (and over 50 subsidiary and predecessor companies that pre-dated Puget Sound Energy).

CPNWS is a program of Western Libraries' Heritage Resources, and is located in the Goltz-Murray Archives Building at WWU.

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Guide to Aerial Photograph Collection Available

Among the wealth of historic photographs available through Western Libraries’ Heritage Resources is the collection of over 30,000 aerial images archived at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Ranging in date from 1935-2001, these images were generated through numerous aerial surveys around the region, including the northwest counties and National Forest lands of Washington State. Formerly housed at Huxley Map Library, these valuable resources were transferred to the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS) in 2011.

Following extensive work by Eric Mastor to further organize and describe the collection, a detailed guide to available flight indices and accompanying sets of images can be accessed online. CPNWS staff welcome inquiries from the public about access and use of the collection, and recommend that interested researchers contact us for an advance appointment to view materials at the archives.  

Stereoscope used to view aerial flight images.

A stereoscope, as pictured above, provides a means to view overlapping, vertical images and obtain a magnified, 3D effect (useful for assessing the depth of terrain). Stereoscopes are available at CPNWS for use by researchers.

The majority of photographs in the collection result from aerial surveys conducted by US government agencies, including the USDA Forest Service and Washington Department of Natural Resources. These include coverage of Whatcom County, the Mt. Baker National Forest and other National Forest and Parks lands in Washington. The collection also includes some coverage of other Washington counties and U.S. states. For example, a small group of images document survey work conducted for the Alaska-Canada Highway during the 1930s. The collection is a valuable resource for researchers interested in environmental history and change (including forestation, glaciation and waterways), and supports fields of inquiry relating to habit restoration, urban growth studies and property history. All are welcome to contact or visit CPNWS to find out more.

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Steve Raymond explores the legacy of Roderick Haig-Brown

Steve Raymond, a life-long fly fisher and author, visited Special Collections and gave a presentation about Roderick Haig-Brown, fly fisher, author, and conservationist. 

The event attracted fly fishers from around the Northwest, who came to hear Mr. Raymond's insights into the literary works of Roderick Haig-Brown.  

Steve RaymondSteve Raymond

Before the presentation, Bruce Shepard, WWU President, presented a book about Western to Tobey Ishii-Anderson, niece of David Ishii, to honor the memory of David Ishii and his gift to Special Collections.

Steve and GuestsSteve Raymond with guests

After Steve Raymond's presentation, he answered questions about Roderick Haig-Brown and his own writing career.  Then everyone browsed the Fly Fishing Collections in the Special Collections storage area and the books exhibited in the Research Room.

Marian and Joan RaymondMarian Alexander and Joan Raymond

Raymond event

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Fly Fishing Students visit Special Collections

Fly FishingOn June 25th, Special Collections was pleased to welcome the Huxley College of the Environment class ESCI 315: The Art, Science, and Ethics of Fly Fishing, taught by Leo Bodensteiner and Steve Meyer.  

The class was shown many of the treasures from the Fly Fishing Collection, including the first American edition of Izaak Walton's classic, The Complete Angler, or, the Contemplative Man's Recreation (1857).

The deluxe edition of The Dettes: A Catskill Legend (enclosed in a custom slipcase with a shadow box on the front containing three mounted flies by the Dettes), The AmericFly Fishingan Fly Fisher, a periodical published by the American Museum of Fly Fishing.  And the Art of Angling Journal, which showcases the beauty of the sport.

Bamboo rods, fly plates, and other realia were on display in the Research Room.  Later the class toured the storage area, exploring the complete Fly Fishing Collection. 

Fly Fishing

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"Accessing Primary Sources through Western Libraries' Heritage Resources Programs" web tutorial now available online

Do your studies at Western require you to conduct research? Does some of that research involve using primary sources? Did you know there are places right here at Western where you can find and work with original primary source documents?

Check out this online tutorial for locating and accessing unique, archival material on campus through Western Libraries’ Heritage Resources programs. You may also use these handy, subject-based research guides to find additional primary source material available at Western and beyond.

Heritage Resources programs include the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives and Records Center, who work together to document the culture and history of Western, the local community and Pacific Northwest, and to promote public and scholarly access to holdings.

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Celebrating Pride Month

Did you know? June is Pride Month, designated in 2000 by President Bill Clinton to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village, New York. 

Western Libraries and its Heritage Resources programs provide access to wide variety of resources relating to LGBTQ h(i/er)story, activism and experience here on Western’s campus and beyond. These include:

To find out more, visit this research guide at http://libguides.wwu.edu/lgbtq_research or contact Libraries’ staff for more assistance. A selection of LGBTQ-related materials from Western Libraries Heritage Resources collections will be on display throughout June next to the Libraries’ main Reference Desk in Haggard Hall.

         Poster for a Gala Ball hosted by Fairhaven College and the Gay People's Alliance, 1975. From the Robert Ashworth Collection, CPNWS.

 Left: Poster advertising a 1975 Gala Ball at Western's Viking Union, sponsored by Fairhaven College and the Gay People's Alliance [Robert Ashworth Collection on the Union of Sexual Minorities Center]; Below: Buttons from the Hands Off Washington (Whatcom County Coalition) Records, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Washington University. 

 

Images of buttons from the Hands Off Washington (Whatcom County Coalition) Records.

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Teaching Learning Academy visits Special Collections

The Teaching Learning Academy (TLA) visited Special Collections this week, two sessions on Wednesday, April 18 and another two sessions on Thursday, April 29.  TLA is interested in the question, "How can we engage and connect multiple voices to strengthen Western as a 21st-century liberal arts university?" TLA in Special Collections
To investigate the history of the liberal arts at Western, TLA members examined several exhibits from the Campus History Collection in Special Collections, including the Annual Catalogue of the Washington State Normal School (an early name for Western), The Self-Starter: Women's League Guide-Book for Freshman Girls, and A Long Range Plan: Perspective of the Future, from 1968. Carmen Werder
The researchers found many references to broad-based, liberal arts, and civilization through the years, including an early reference to a required liberal arts class in a 1926 issue of the student newspaper of the Washington State Normal School, The Weekly Messenger, which was found by searching the new online WWU Student Newspaper Collection, in the library's Digital Collections.  Openers
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Return to the River: Steve Raymond explores the literary legacy of Roderick Haig-Brown

WWU Libraries Heritage Resources Presents

Ledge PoolReturn to the River: Steve Raymond explores the literary legacy of Roderick Haig-Brown

August 3, 2012

1-3pm

Special Collections
Wilson Library 6th Floor

Save the Date!

Roderick Haig-Brown is known internationally for his writing on fly fishing. Born in England, he came to British Columbia, Canada, and lived on the banks of the Campbell River, Vancouver Island.  He published many books and articles, and is known for his writing on fly fishing. 

Roderick Haig-Brown article in the Wikipedia

Books by Roderick Haig-Brown available in the library

Steve Raymond was born in Bellingham, Wash.  Raymond has been a major contributor of articles and book reviews to angling magazines, and served as an editor of The flyfisher and Fly fishing in salt waters. He has won many awards including the Roderick Haig-Brown Award of the Federation of Fly Fishers and the Letcher Lambuth Angling Craftsman Award of the Washington Fly Fishing Club.

Photo: Ledge Pool.  Image taken at the Grand Ronde River, October 15, 1964.  Ralph E. Wahl Photograph Collection, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, a department of Heritage Resources, Western Libraries

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