Western Libraries News

Thur hours: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Little women: or, Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy

Author: 
Louisa May Alcott
Publication Information: 
Boston: Roberts Brothers
Location: 
Special Collections Rare Book Collection.
Call Number: 
PS1017.L558 1885
December, 2014

“’Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents,’” grumbled Jo, lying on the rug,” and so begins one of the classic tales many read, especially youn

Library Department: 

Elwha Exhibit Ends Dec. 30th

Just a reminder that if you haven't yet had a chance to check out Elwha: A River Reborn, a new traveling exhibit from the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, it is still on display in Western Libraries Special Collections on the 6th Floor of Wilson Library through the end of December. 

 

Based on a Mountaineers book of the same name by Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes and photographer Steve Ringman, the exhibit takes viewers to the Northwest’s legendary Elwha River Valley to discover the people, places, and history behind a remarkable regional story – and the largest dam removal project ever undertaken. Through first-person accounts, stunning photographs, and informative text printed on free-standing banners, follow the Elwha’s journey from abundant wilderness to economic engine – to an unprecedented experiment in restoration and renewal that has captured global attention.

 

Elwha: A River Reborn is available for viewing Monday-Friday between 11am and 4pm through December 30th, (except during the dates Special Collections is closed: Wed. December 17th between the hours of 11:30 am and 2:00pm, and also from December 24th through December 26th). 

 

Elwha: A River Reborn was developed by the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in collaboration with The Seattle Times, Mountaineers Books, and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.  National touring sponsor is The Snoqualmie Tribe. Sponsorship of the local presentation of Elwha is provided by Western Libraries and Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University.

Library Department: 

Intersession and Holiday Hours

Western Libraries and various affiliated programs & departments will have special hours during the intersession break. Details are listed below.

  • Western Libraries intersession hours (December 13, 2014 - January 5, 2015) are Mon. - Fri. 8:30am to 4:30pm. Closed:  December 25th & January 1st.

  • Western Libraries Special Collections  intersession hours are Mon. - Fri. 11:00am to 4:00pm. Special Collections will be closed on Wed. December 17th between the hours of 11:30 am and 2:00pm. Also closed: from December 24th - December 26th, & January 1st. 

  • Western Libraries Map Collection intersession hours are Mon. - Fri. 11:00am to 3:00pm. Closed: December 22nd - January 2nd.

  • The Music Library's intersession hours are Mon. - Fri. 8:00am to 5:00pm.  Closed December 23rd - January 1st.

  • The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies hours are Mon. - Fri.  8:30am to noon & 1:00pm - 4:30pm. Closed: December 24th - December 30th, &  January 1st

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Library Department: 

Heritage Resources Fall 2014 Newsletter

The Fall 2014 issue of Heritage Highlights is now available! This Teaching and Learning Edition features several new and ongoing initiatives including our inaugural Heritage Resources Speaker Series, a recent class visit to the archives by Environmental Education graduate students, and the availability of records management training to Western’s campus community.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Topics: 

Partners in Teaching and Learning

The instruction plan for Western Libraries Heritage Resources articulates the goal of ensuring that Western students “are able to find, understand, and interpret a wide variety of research sources in various contexts throughout their lives.” With that in mind, Heritage Resources staff work closely with instructors to meet specific course needs and learning objectives by providing access to a wealth of materials that can enhance, enrich, and enliven research in nearly any subject area.

 

For example, this past August, a new cohort of Environmental Education graduate students visited Western’s campus and spent time working with archival and primary source materials at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS).  As part of the M.Ed Residency program partnership between the North Cascades Institute (NCI) and Western’s Huxley College of the Environment, these students live at the Environmental Learning Center located in the North Cascades National Park for one year, during which time they are able to immerse themselves in place-based pedagogy.

 

At the heart of place-based education is the recognition that experiential community-based learning enhances a student’s educational experience by treating the local community as one of the primary sources for teaching and learning. The mission of the CPNWS is to “enhance public and scholarly understanding of the region’s past and present,” and this natural programmatic alignment led Huxley faculty and Heritage Resources staff to recognize an opportunity for collaboration.

 

In preparation for the on-site visit, Heritage Resources staff arranged a selection of original and archival materials representative of various perspectives of place - including environmental, economic, recreational, and indigenous views - for students to review and analyze. In the Archives Building Research Room, students divided into groups and reviewed the maps, photographs, pamphlets, letters, and other materials. Together they considered issues related to the construction of cultural and regional identity, the evolution of policy, perceptions of concepts such as “conservation” and “wilderness,” and the significance of place names in determining cultural values. Course instructor and NCI Graduate Program Coordinator Joshua Porter posed several challenging questions, which led to lively and interactive class discussions.

 

Different resources on each table give you insight in terms of both the media and the policy – How does the creation of information determine the ‘value’ of whatever is being discussed? What is the leverage you have if you are creating these maps? What is your leverage in terms of conveying to the world what matters, what has value, what has meaning?” asked Porter.

 

Several students questioned what could be the implications for the cultural heritage of a place when traditional native names were removed and replaced with new names. Others pointed out how some of the maps were defined in terms of resource extraction rather than conservation. When looking at the photographs, some students observed how having access to archival materials like these gave them a glimpse into the lives of people from the past, bringing them closer despite the passage of time and changes in cultural contexts. Often these glimpses inspired unexpected insights and additional questions.

 

“Although there was a lack of reciprocity in terms of resource extraction, it’s also impossible to miss the level of intimacy between the people and the land in these photographs, even if the conservation policy was lacking at that time. It would be so interesting to talk to these people. The photographs capture historical moments as opposed to all of the moments of everyday life. Another mode of inquiry would also be interesting to pursue,said student Liz Blackman.

 

After this observation, Roz Koester, Assistant Archivist for Outreach and Instruction for Heritage Resources, was quick to mention the oral histories that are also contained at the CPNWS, and invited Blackman to return if she would like to further explore those personal narratives. Koester explained that oral histories offer an opportunity to hear from the people we are interested in first-hand and in their own words. She also mentioned that sometimes people will begin their research with certain expectations about what they are going to find, but often their perspectives will alter as a result of the information they encounter.

 

“Exploring these types of complexities is part of the beauty of working with primary sources. You can come to these materials with a bias and that is where you start your inquiry, but the records that are here can present an opportunity to challenge that bias. Original, archival, primary source research offers us insight that can make us challenge our own assumptions, our own points of view. You might be led in a completely different direction than what you originally intended. As archivists, it’s the critical analysis piece that we really want people to get out of this experience,” explained Koester.

 

The class concluded with Porter leading a discussion about how students and educators can benefit in utilizing the materials offered by Heritage Resources to explore the relationship between how meaning is constructed, how cultural values are expressed, the impact this can have on policy and information creation, and how this in turn affects our own assumptions about both people and place. Porter also pointed out that as environmental educators, the students should remember that no matter where they go once they have completed graduate school, they can use archival and primary source materials to benefit their future teaching and learning practices.

 

“Moving forward, I really encourage all of us to continue to do research here, but also to keep in mind what resources there are in every community that we enter into in the future, how to sleuth out those resources and how, as educators, we can uses these sources,” stated Porter.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research. If you’d like to learn more about the Heritage Resources Instruction Program, or are interested in discussing how Heritage Resources can support your teaching and learning needs, please contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu or phone (360) 650-6621.

Library Department: 

Canines on Campus

Beginning Monday, December 1st through Thursday December 11th, Western Libraries will be joined by members of the “Canines on Campus” program, (formerly known as “Pet Partners). Feel free to stop by the library to say hi and de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!

 

Animals who are part of the Canines on Campus program are registered through several different agencies and have met certain standards of skills and aptitude. Whatcom Therapy Dogs and Dogs on Call are the two organizations which provide volunteers to the Canines on Campus program, and teams of our favorite humans and animals (which still include Smokey the cat!) will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library between the hours of 10am and 8pm.

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Library Department: 

Display Cases Available

Western Libraries provides access to display cases to departments and organizations at Western as part of its service to the academic community.  Exhibit cases are available to any Western-affiliated organization, and may be reserved for one to two months. 

Exhibits in the Libraries are created to direct attention to the materials, services, and aims of the Libraries, or to reflect the aims, goals, and services of departments and organizations at Western.  Past exhibits have included examples from the Children’s Literature Conference, the Students for Sustainable Water Associated Students club and their water bottle recycling program, and the Transportation Services promotion of the “May is Bike Month” campaign.  The Libraries’ exhibit cases are also an excellent forum for showcasing student work. 

If you are interested in making a request for a display, please make your reservation by submitting the online application form at least one month before the date you wish to begin your exhibit. Request approval is subject to case availability. For more information about current exhibits or exhibit policies, see the Display Case Exhibits web page

Contact Person: 
Library Department: 

How OneSearch Can Help You

OneSearch is Western’s new search interface that retrieves results from databases and catalogs found in academic libraries across the Pacific Northwest. In OneSearch, content owned by Western is immediately accessible by our students, staff, and faculty; all other content from neighboring institutions can be requested and quickly delivered. OneSearch will continue to evolve and improve this year when all 37 Orbis Cascade Alliance libraries complete the migration of their catalog and database records into the new shared system.

OneSearch is Western’s name for the Primo™ search engine product developed by the international information systems vendor Ex Libris. This product has been adopted by academic libraries around the world, including California State University at Sacramento, George Mason University, Cardiff University, University of Cape Town, and Harvard University Library. Note: You can find a comprehensive list of academic libraries that have implemented Primo as their institutional catalog here.

How can OneSearch serve you? Here is an overview of what OneSearch can offer Western faculty and students:

For Western’s Faculty & Staff:

  • Browse Searching: Browse by author, title, subject heading, SUDOC number, and Library of Congress call number within OneSearch.
  • Known Journal Title Searching: Need access to a specific journal? Search by journal title in the A-Z Journals interface.
  • Languages: Filter search results by several languages.
  • Heritage Resources: Search for, and retrieve, item records that detail holdings within Western Washington University’s Heritage Resources Department, including Western Libraries Special Collections, University Records & Archives, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies.
  • Library of Congress Classification Facet: Filter search results through a new LC Classification facet, which can enhance the disciplinary relevance of your results.
  • Research & Library Services Management: Manage your research and library services experience through the My Account functionality. Save items, searches, and more to your e-Shelf.

For Western’s Students:

  • Breadth of Resources from a Single Search Interface: Using the ‘Books, Articles + More’ scope, students can search for content across databases and catalogs. For a full list of data sources, please refer to this list.
  • Research & Library Services Management: OneSearch allows students to manage their research and library services experience through the My Account functionality, where they can save items, searches, and more to their e-Shelf.

Future Directions

During this academic year, the OneSearch Management Team will continue the transition from the Libraries old catalog system to a fully implemented shared catalog that draws upon data sources from the Orbis Cascade Alliance’s 37 member libraries. During this time of transition, the Team (a taskforce devoted to improving OneSearch) will continue to actively seeking faculty and student feedback. If you have experienced particular benefits or limitations with the product, or have suggested improvements or enhancements, we very much want to hear from you. Please contact Rebecca Marrall to set up a time for her to visit you. And for one-stop information about OneSearch functionality and examples of continuing product improvements, please see http://libguides.wwu.edu/onesearch.

For more information, contact:

Rebecca M. Marrall / Diversity & Disability Services Librarian, Asst. Professor / Western Libraries, WL275 / (360) 650 – 4493 rebecca.marrall@wwu.edu

Contact Person: 
Library Department: 

The Tale of Corally Crothers

Author: 
Romney Gay
Publication Information: 
Cleveland: Harter Publishing Company, 1932.
Location: 
Special Collections Children's Collection
Call Number: 
PZ8.3.G39 Cort 1932
November, 2014

The Tale of Corally Crothers is a charming story of an only child in search of a friend. She arose one morning, bathed, dressed, packed and determinedly went off to find her friend -- which turns out to be you! The story is written in rhyme and includes lovely Art Deco illustrations created by the author. 

Library Department: 

Writing Resources for Grad Students

Did you know the Writing Center offers resources and info sessions specifically for graduate students? Beginning this Thursday, October 30th, there will be a number of opportunities throughout the quarter for you to get assistance, tips, and information to help you with your research and writing projects.

Questions? Email grad.writing.center@wwu.edu for more information, or go to http://libguides.wwu.edu/gradwritingcenter

Library Department: 
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