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How does the political context of art affect the way we consume it?

Posted on: February 24, 2020

Topic(s): Updates, Events

TLA On-Campus Dialogue: How does the political context of art affect the way we consume it?

Knowledge Bennett standing next to his art piece, Obama Cowboy, Six-Shooter (2012).Join faculty, staff, students, and members of the community as together we explore the question, “How does the political context of art affect the way we consume it?” On March 4, 2020 in the WWU Gallery, from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m., a panel presentation will be followed by small group conversation in the WWU Gallery.

This Teaching-Learning Academy dialogue-based event complements the Western Gallery’s current exhibition, "Knowledge Bennett: Road to Damascus." Knowledge’s work appropriates pop culture imagery to address and critique American idealism, political corruption, and systematic racial stratification from past to the present.

The TLA dialogue events offer students, faculty, staff, and community members a chance to come together and explore questions and issues that affect us all. These dialogues also give participants a way to explore difficult topics, practice and refine productive communication strategies, and develop interpersonal communication and collaboration skills.

For more information, please contact Nathan.Romond@wwu.edu  or call (360) 650-3740.

Caption/Credit info for the image: Knowledge Bennett with his Obama Cowboy, Six-Shooter (2012); photo credit: Aaron Lacey/Courtesy KNOW



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Cinema East Film Series continues Feb. 11 with ‘Early Spring’

Posted on: February 7, 2020

Topic(s): Events

Cinema East Film Series continues Feb. 11 with ‘Early Spring’

Theatrical release poster for Yasujirō Ozu's film 'Early Spring'

The next film in the Cinema East series is Ozu Yasujiro’s 1956 feature Early Spring, which screens at 5:45 p.m. on Tuesday, February 11, 2020, at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street).

Early Spring was Ozu’s first film after Tokyo Story, and his next-to-last black and white film.  Quietly, the film builds a rich story about the lives of young office workers, infidelity, the lingering effects of the war, dissatisfaction with work, and other topics. 

“It’s become one of my favorite Ozu films, with a wonderful ensemble cast headed by Awashima Chikage, Ikebe Ryo, and Kishi Keiko,” explained series curator and librarian from Western Washington University Libraries Jeff Purdue, adding “I’ve seen this film quite a bit, including several times in theatres, and I can’t wait to see it again at the Pickford.” 

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, each film in the Cinema East series, (formerly known as the Masters of Asian Cinema series), begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators.

Early Spring will be introduced by Dr. Colleen A. Laird (PhD), who is Assistant Professor of Japanese Popular Culture in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia where she teaches classes on Japanese cinema and media. She has written several articles on Japanese cinema, ranging in topics from Japanese celebrities like Kikuchi Rinko and contemporary directors such as Nishikawa Miwa and Ogigami Naoko, to historical analysis of Japanese film posters in the postwar era and the concept of “home” in Japanese cinema.  She is currently working on a monograph on Japanese women film directors, but is often distracted by smaller projects including works on Netflix Japan, the HBO show Westworld, and the role of haptics and gameplay in Japanese video games.

For more information about this film event, please see the following link:  https://www.pickfordfilmcenter.org/early-spring-cinema-east/  or contact Jeff.Purdue@wwu.edu.



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John Scurlock to Speak on Feb. 26 about Aerial Photography

Posted on: January 30, 2020

Topic(s): Updates, Events

John Scurlock to Speak on Feb. 26 about Aerial Photography in the Remote Western Ranges of North America 

Photo of John ScurlockRenowned aerial photographer John Scurlock will give a talk entitled, "Mapping Mountains: Aerial Photography in the Remote Western Ranges of North America," on February 26, 2020, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Map Collection at Western Washington University Libraries. This event is free and open to the public.

John Scurlock has been photographing mountains and glaciers across western North America since 2002. During his presentation, Scurlock will talk about the difficulties he has encountered in photographing alpine terrain in regions that have been poorly mapped and seldom visited, with few named features.

Scurlock has covered terrain from Alaska to California and from the Coast Mountains and Cascades to the Rockies of Canada and the United States. He has provided images for the Washington State Department of Transportation, the US Geological Survey, Department of the Interior/National Park Service, US Forest Service, Parks Canada, BC Parks, Western Washington University, University of Washington, Simon Fraser University, and the University of Northern British Columbia.  In 2018, he completed an eleven-year project (in cooperation with Portland State University) to photograph every glacier in the lower forty-eight states. His images have appeared in numerous books and publications such as Adventure Journal, The American Alpine Journal, Canadian Alpine Journal, Journal of Glaciology, Alpinist Magazine, Rock& Ice, Ski Journal, and Climbing Magazine.   His ground-breaking book, Snow & Spire: Flights to Winter in the North Cascade Range, was published in November, 2011.

This talk is part of the “Speaking of Maps” program, which are quarterly talks designed to highlight the use and value of maps in research, in teaching and learning, and in daily life. For more information, please contact Dennis Matthews, Map Collection Manager, at Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu.



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What is our role in creating a just and equitable census?

Posted on: January 22, 2020

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Off-Campus TLA Dialogue on Feb. 13th: "What is our role in creating a just and equitable census?"

Aerial view looking downward at people standing in a circle with only the shoes and legs of the people in the circle visibleWhat is our role in creating a just and equitable census? Participants from the Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) at Western Libraries invite you to explore this question during the upcoming off-campus dialogue which will be held at the Fairhaven Branch of the Bellingham Library (1117 12th St.) on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2020 from 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

A brief informational panel featuring members of the Bellingham community will be followed by small group discussion among all participants.

The TLA Community Dialogues are a chance for students, faculty, staff, and community members to come together and explore questions and issues that affect us all. These dialogues also give participants a way to explore difficult topics, practice and refine productive communication strategies, and develop interpersonal communication and collaboration skills.

For this event series, the TLA is partnering with the WWU Center for Community Learning and the Volunteer Center of Whatcom County. Events are open to everyone, and participation offers a way to get involved, meet new people, and make connections outside of the typical academic setting. No advanced registration is required, but faculty and staff wishing to participate in this dialogue as part of their Employee Development Plan can sign up through PageUp via the online training portal

For more information, please contact Nathan.Romond@wwu.edu  or call (360) 650-3740.



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Jackie Caplan-Auerbach: "Sounds of an Era's End" - Feb.12

Posted on: January 20, 2020

Topic(s): Events

Jackie Caplan-Auerbach to Speak about the 2018 Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i

Jackie Caplan-Auerbach on the 2018 research cruise offshore Kilauea with lava flowing into the water visible behind her.Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, professor in the Department of Geology and the Associate Dean of the College of Science and Engineering at Western Washington University, will give a talk entitled “Sounds of an Era’s End: The 2018 Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, From Ocean Bottom Seismometers,” on February 12, 2020 at 4:00 p.m. in the Map Collection at Western Libraries. This event is free and open to the public.

The 2018 eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawai’i, was remarkable in many ways: it had the highest flux of lava ever recorded at Kilauea; it resulted in the destruction of over 700 structures and the displacement of thousands of Hawai`i residents; and it created unprecedented deformation at the volcano’s summit. During her presentation, Caplan-Auerbach will talk about her work as a lead investigator during that eruption to deploy a network of ocean-bottom seismometers near the Big Island to record seismic activity associated with the submarine portion of the volcano.  The network also recorded the sounds associated with lava-water interactions at Kilauea’s coast, providing a window into explosive processes and lava flux. Data from the seismic and acoustic networks provide insight into the evolution and stability of how volcanoes grow and evolve.

Caplan-Auerbach has been at Western since 2006, teaching about topics ranging from introductory geology to earthquake seismology to mantle convection.  Her research focuses on the seismic and acoustic signals generated by volcanoes and landslides.  Most of the volcanoes she studies are in the undersea domain, and she is happiest when on the water.

Prior to working at Western, she spent her undergraduate years at Yale University, where she earned degrees in both Physics and English.  She then taught high school physics in the San Francisco Bay Area for six years before moving to Honolulu to pursue graduate study.  In 2001 she earned her Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, and she has also worked for the Alaska Volcano Observatory at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and with the U.S. Geological Survey. 

This special talk is offered as part of the Western Libraries Reading Series, which is dedicated to showcasing the scholarly and creative work of faculty and staff who are engaged in research, writing, and teaching at Western. For more information about this event, please contact abby koehler, abby.koehler@wwu.edu, 360-650-3342.



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