Heritage Resources

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Intersession & Holiday Hours

Intersession Hours December 10 - January 3

Western Libraries will be closed weekends but open Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm beginning December 10th through January 3rd. The Libraries will also be closed for holidays on Monday, December 26th and Monday, January 2nd.

Additional areas with special intersession hours are listed below:

 

Map Collection

Open M-F 11am to 3pm Dec. 12th -16th  (closed weekends)

Closed Dec. 19th – Jan. 3rd

 

Special Collections

Open M-F 11am to 4pm Dec. 12th – 23rd  (closed weekends)

Closed Dec. 24th – Jan. 2nd

 

Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

Open M-F 8:30am - noon/1:00 - 4:30p.m. Dec. 12th - 23rd (closed noon-1:00pm & weekends).

Closed Dec. 24th – Jan. 2nd

 

University Archives

Open M-F 8:30a.m.-4:30p.m. Dec. 12th - 23rd (closed weekends, archival research by appointment only).

Closed Dec. 24th – Jan. 2nd

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Skye Burn: "The Strength of a Dream"

Skye Burn Talk to Launch WWU Exhibit on the Life and Work of Award-Winning Children’s Author and Illustrator Doris Burn

Local author and multi-dimensional artist Skye Burn will speak about the life and legacy of her mother, award-winning children’s author and illustrator Doris Burn, at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, October 11th in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor). The event is free and open to the public.
 
Skye Burn has worked locally and internationally in the domains of art-infused leadership, social artistry, art-based social change, leadership education and community development. She is co-founder and former director of The Flow Project, a nonprofit organization offering research and education in art-infused leadership, and has served in multiple capacities on UNESCO-sponsored projects and initiatives.
 
During her presentation, entitled “The Strength of a Dream: A Daughter’s Portrait of a Northwest Children’s Author,” Skye Burn will provide a portrait of family stories, impressions, and memories of Doris Burn, including how her mother came to realize her life-long dream of becoming a children’s author and illustrator.
 
The event marks the launch of an exhibit featuring original manuscripts and artwork created by Doris Burn which will open at Western Washington University on Monday, October 3rd and will run through March 10th, also in Western Libraries Special Collections. It will be available for viewing weekdays between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., excluding weekends and holidays, and is also free and open to the public.
 
A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. She also wrote the much-loved favorites The Summerfolk, and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of other well-known children’s works.
 
The exhibit incorporates manuscripts and artwork, and explores some of the themes and aspects of Doris Burn’s work that have connected with readers across generations. The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC.
 

The talk is being offered as a Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program, which are quarterly events featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields and who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. 

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Gloria Burgess: I'll Fly Away

Gloria Burgess to Present "I'll Fly Away: A Sojourn Through Poetry and Spirituals"

Award-winning poet, performer and distinguished scholar Gloria Burgess will explore the rich heritage of African-American spirituals and poetry at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 4 in Room 16 of Western Washington University’s Performing Arts Center.The presentation is free and open to the public.

During this interactive presentation, Burgess will discuss the literary and artistic forms of spirituals and poetry that tied communities together socially and artistically during slavery, and continue to enrich the multicultural fabric of our state today through the work of contemporary African-America poets, musicians and artists. This sojourn through words and music will cover the sometimes hidden meanings of specific spirituals and poems, including how the art helped people cope as they were transported from one continent, and one culture, to another.

Burgess has presented keynotes, master classes, and artistic tributes focusing on African-American, African, and other oral traditions for over 30 years. She has presented, consulted, and performed in a variety of venues, including Carnegie Hall, the Washington National Cathedral, the Kenyan Parliament, and the South African Embassy in Switzerland. Burgess holds a doctorate in Performance Studies from the University of Southern California, and has served as regular and visiting faculty at universities in Washington and California. She is a Poetry Fellow with Cave Canem, a prestigious collective of poets and writers of the African diaspora, sponsored by the American Academy of Poets.

This special talk is presented by Humanities Washington, which offers a roster of cultural experts and scholars who provide low-cost, high-quality public presentations across the state, encouraging audiences to think, learn, and engage in conversation. The event is being co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Western Washington University Departments of English, Liberal Studies, and Music.

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History of Cleanliness

Dr. Kendra Smith-Howard: 2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowship

The recipient of the 2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowship, Kendra Smith-Howard, will explore the history of cleanliness in 20th Century America, including the role and impact of Georgia-Pacific and other regional wood-pulp manufacturers, during the talk “A Messy History of Cleaning Up: Georgia-Pacific and the History of the Disposable Diaper,” at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, June 7 in Western Libraries Special Collections  (Wilson Library 6th Floor).  The presentation is free and open to the public.
 
 
Dr. Smith-Howard holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is an Associate Professor at the University of Albany, SUNY. Her research focuses on 20th century environmental history in the United States, and her first book, Pure and Modern Milk: An Environmental History Since 1900, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. 
 
 
Prior to her presentation, Smith-Howard will spend a week conducting research at Western’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies as part of the opportunity given to her by the James W. Scott Research Fellowship, during which she will examine archival collections which include records of the Bellingham Division of Georgia-Pacific, and oral histories of the Bellingham industrial waterfront.
 
 
The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowship was established to promote the use of Western’s archival collections and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Funding for the fellowship is awarded in honor of the late James W. Scott, a founder and the first director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest.
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When Local Becomes National

Panel to Discuss the Work of Renowned Photojournalist Wallie V. Funk

On Tuesday, February 2 from 4-5:30pm in Western Libraries Special Collections, three panelists familiar with the work of noted and prolific photographer Wallie V. Funk will discuss Funk's photography and the place his photographs have in the history of local and national photojournalism. Selections from Funk's work are currently on display in Special Collections and available for viewing from 11am to 4pm, excluding weekends and holidays. 

 

During his long career as a photographer, journalist, and co-owner of the Anacortes American, the Whidbey News-Times, and the South Whidbey Record, Funk photographed a diverse and eclectic range of subjects, including several U.S. presidential visits to Washington State; the Beatles’ and Rolling Stones’ concerts in Seattle; the 1970 Penn Cove whale capture; local and regional accidents and disasters (both natural and man-made); and community events and military activities on Whidbey Island.

 

Panelists are: Paul Cocke, Director of WWU Office of Communications and Marketing and former employee of the Anacortes American, Theresa Trebon, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and Local Historian, and Scott Terrell, Photojournalist for theSkagit Valley Herald, WWU Journalism Instructor. 

 

This special presentation is sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western’s Office of University Communications and Marketing, and Western's Department of Journalism.

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Intersession & Holiday Hours

Western Libraries will be closed weekends but open  Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm beginning December 12 through January 4th. The Libraries will also be closed for holidays on both Friday, December 25th and Friday, January 1st.

 

The Wilson North entrance to the library will be closed from December 21st through December 24th, but the library will be accessible during open hours via the Haggard Hall entrance.  

 

Additional areas with special intersession hours are listed below:

 

  • Map Collection

    • Open M-F 11am to 3pm from 12/12-12/18 / closed weekends

    • Closed 12/19 - 1/3

 

  • Special Collections

    • Open M-F 11am to 4pm from 12/12-12/22 / closed weekends

    • Closed 12/23 - 12/25

 

  • Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

    • Open M-F 8:30am-noon/1:00-4:30pm (closed noon-1:00pm & weekends) 12/12 - 12/18

    • Closed 12/19 - 1/3

 

  • University Archives

    • Open M-F 8:30am-4:30pm (closed weekends, archival research by appointment only)

    • Closed 12/19 - 1/3 (Records Management services will be available during this time)

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Geology Underfoot

Speaking of Maps: Dave Tucker

 

Dave Tucker, Research Associate in geology at Western Washington University, will discuss how he wrote a geology guide designed for people who are interested in geology but who may have little experience or training in the topic. His talk “Writing a Peoples' Natural History Guidebook: Geology Underfoot in Western Washington,” will be held from  4-5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 5 in the Map Collection (Wilson Library 170).  The presentation is free and open to the public.

 

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington, published by Mountain Press Publishing, is described by Tucker as a “get-out-of-the-car-and-put-your-hands-on-the-rock sort of guide book,” packed with introductory geologic descriptions, color photographs and diagrams. Included are field trips to places of local renown and interest, such as Artists Point, Larrabee State Park, and a tour of Western's Geology Museum in the hallways of the Environmental Studies Building.

 

A resident of Bellingham, Tucker has a Masters degree in geology from Western and is a research associate in the Geology Department. He is a director of the Mount Baker Volcano Research Center, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization that raises funds to support research at the active volcano and educate the public about volcanic hazards of Mount Baker.

 

Tucker mapped the distribution of volcanic ash deposits from past eruptions at Mount Baker, and studied other volcanic rocks in the North Cascades. He leads public field trips and gives presentations about the geology of northwest Washington, and is author of a popular blog, Northwest Geology Field Trips: http://nwgeology.wordpress.com/.

 

This special talk is being offered as a “Speaking of Maps” program, which are quarterly talks designed to highlight the use and value of maps in research, in teaching and learning, and in daily life. These talks are held in Western Libraries Map Collection, which is open Mon. - Fri. from 11am to 3pm. 

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One Arctic or Many?

Questioning Boundaries in the Arctic

Join us in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor) on October 22, 2015 from 12pm to 2pm for a special panel discussion about Canada's Arctic. 

 The panel is held in conjunction with a Government of Canada traveling photographic exhibition titled "Canada's Arctic: Vibrant and Thriving," which offers a brief glimpse into the lives of Northerners while showing a perspective of the environment that helps shape and influence this vibrant region.

 

Featured Panelists: Nadine Fabbi (Managing Director, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington); Joël Plouffe (École nationale d’administration publique (ENAP) in Montréal); Heather Nicol (Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies, University of Washington, Trent University Professor for The School of the Environment and The School for the Study of Canada); David Rossiter (Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University). 

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2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowships

2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowships

Western Washington University’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies welcomes applications for the James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships, established to promote awareness and use of archival collections at Western and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. The fellowships are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies is a program of Western Libraries Heritage Resources, located in the Goltz-Murray Archives Building.

About the Fellowships

Up to $1000 funding is available in 2016 to scholars who propose to undertake significant research using archival holdings at CPNWS. The number and size of awards granted annually will be determined by the application review committee. Applications are accepted from individuals in graduate programs (and/or who are new to the field of historical research and writing) as well as those individuals who have finished the Ph.D (and/or are published authors). 

Fellowship Requirements

  • Fellows will be expected to spend at least one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence prior to October 31, 2016. Additional information about CPNWS collections is available at http://library.wwu.edu/hr/cpnws.
  • Fellows will be asked to give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit. The audience will vary depending on the time of the year, but may include Western students, faculty and staff, as well as members of the general public.
  • After completing their residency, Fellows will be asked to provide a brief (300-500 word) written statement describing their research and use of CPNWS holdings to support scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. This statement may be quoted from and/or otherwise published by Western Washington University.

Application Information

To apply for Fellowship funds, please submit the following information by November 13, 2015:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic
  • Two letters of recommendation

To apply via email, please send application materials to Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu and enter “Scott Research Fellowship Application” in the subject line of the message. To apply by postal mail, please send materials to Ruth Steele, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, 516 High St. MS 9123, Bellingham, WA 98225-9123.

Applications will be reviewed after November 15, 2015, with announcements of awards expected by December 2015. Funds will be awarded after a Fellow(s) has conducted their research at CPNWS, and delivered their presentation and written statement. Fellowship awards may be subject to taxation in accordance with the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, and applicants are advised that they may need a U.S. Taxpayer Identification Number (i.e. SSN or ITIN) to receive funds.

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Event Featuring Jessica Arnett (8/14)

Scholar and Fellowship Recipient Jessica Arnett to Speak at WWU about Alaska

Jessica Leslie Arnett, recipient of the 2015 James W. Scott Research Fellowship, will speak about Alaska during an upcoming talk entitled “Between Empires and Frontiers: Sovereignty, Land, Labor, and Belonging in Territorial Alaska” at Western Washington University. This event is free and open to the public, and will take place on Friday, August 14 at 3:00pm in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th Floor).

           

Arnett’s research interests were shaped by her own experience of having been raised in south central Alaska from a young age. She is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Minnesota, a 2015-2016 Andrew Mellon Dissertation Fellow, and a short-term Newberry Library Consortium for American Indian Studies Fellow.

 

Arnett’s dissertation, “Between Empires and Frontiers: Alaska Native Sovereignty and U.S. Settler Imperialism,” examines territorial Alaska as a geopolitical space in which the legal and political frameworks of settler colonialism and imperialism converged, and also explores how Alaska Natives leveraged the tensions produced by this entanglement in their claims on sovereignty, land, and belonging.

 

Prior to her talk, Arnett will spend a week at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS) conducting extensive research as part of the opportunity afforded her by the James W. Scott Research Fellowship. This fellowship was established to promote awareness and use of archival collections at Western, and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Funds are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region and a founder and first Director of the CPNWS.

 

For more information about this event or the CPNWS, contact: Ruth Steele, Archivist at the CPNWS, (360) 650-7747, Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu

 

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