Heritage Resources

Appears on the Heritage Resources Page

Barney Scout Mann & the Pacific Crest Trail

Barney Scout Mann to Discuss His Recent Book ‘The Pacific Crest Trail: Exploring America’s Wilderness Trail’

Pacific Crest Trail historian and avid backpacker Barney Scout Mann will speak about the history of the trail and the publication it inspired at Western Libraries at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 23 in the Reading Room (Wilson Library, 4 Central). The event is free and open to the public.
 

A backpacker for 50 years, Barney Scout Mann was 13 when he went on his first 50-miler – a week-long backpack in the Sierra Nevada. In 2007, he and his wife Sandy thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, spending more than five months walking a 2,650-mile continuous line from Mexico to Canada. The New York Times calls Mann “the informal historian for the trail” and Backpacker Magazine calls him a “geek for trail history.”

Earlier this year, Mann co-authored the Pacific Crest Trail Association’s new book, The Pacific Crest Trail: Exploring America’s Wilderness Trail, along with Mark Larabee. The book tells the gripping saga of this true American wilderness trail through a series of 250 historic and scenic photographs. It was recently named “Book of the Year” by Backpacker Magazine.

During his presentation, Mann will present stories, photos and videos from the trail, followed by book sales and signings.

 

This talk is being offered as part of the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program, which are events featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields and who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. 

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Climbing Mount Everest

Larry Nielson and Paul Madison to Discuss Historic Climb of Mount Everest Jan. 17

 
 
Western Athletic Hall of Famer Larry Nielson and Western Athletics Historian Paul Madison will speak at Western Libraries at 12:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 17th in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor). The event is free and open to the public.
 
During this talk, Madison will interview Nielson about his historic ascent up the world’s highest mountain, and they will also discuss what motivated Nielson to pursue mountain climbing. On May 7, 1983, Nielson, along with three other Americans and a Nepalese Sherpa, summited the peak from the southeast ridge located on the Nepal-China border. Nielson was the first American mountaineer to climb Mt. Everest without using bottled oxygen. 
 
Besides Everest, Nielson has climbed Mount Lobouche and the northeast face of Mount Kangchenjunga in Nepal; Peak Lenin in the former Soviet Union; Denali (Mount McKinley) and Mount La Perouse in Alaska; and on numerous occasions Mount Rainier in Washington State. 
 
While a student at Western, Nielson was an outstanding runner in cross country and track and field, making national appearances in both sports. Nielson completed his teaching degree at Western in 1970, and earned a Master’s degree in psychology at Washington State University in 1976. He was inducted into the WWU Athletics Hall of Fame in 2000, and received an Alumni Achievement Award from Washington State University in 2010. 
 
Madison is serving his second year as Western Athletics Historian following nearly fifty years as Director of Sports Information at Western. He was inducted into the College Sports Information Directors of America Hall of Fame in 2011, and received the WWU Athletics Lynda Goodrich Legacy Award in 2015.  Madison first met Nielson when they were both students at Western in 1966, and he was a member of the first journalism class to graduate from Western in 1971. He is the author of the online series “Carver Memories,” which shares stories and interviews with former Western student athletes, coaches, and staff. 
 
 
 
The talk is offered as part of the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program, which are events featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields and who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. 
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Campus History with Heritage Resources

The Fall 2016 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue we explore Western's 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.campus history, including a timeline of past presidents, the development of the university's physical and built environment, and recollections and reminiscences of former faculty and staff told through oral histories.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.

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Doris Burn Exhibit

Special Exhibit: "Plenty of Things to Do" featuring the work of Northwest Children's Author Doris Burn

A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. She also wrote the much-loved favorites The Summerfolk, and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of other well-known children’s works. 

This special exhibit incorporates manuscripts and artwork, and explores some of the themes and aspects of Doris Burn’s work that have connected with readers across generations. The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC. Additionallydigital version of the Doris Burn exhibit is now available online, as are detailed collection guides to the Doris Burn Artwork and Manuscripts and the South Burn Papers

The exhibit currently on display in the library is available for viewing weekdays in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor) between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., (excluding weekends and holidays), and is also free and open to the public.

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Building a Collectible Angling Library

John Alevras to Speak at WWU on July 13 

 
Noted fly-fishing author and book collector John Alevras will speak at Western Libraries at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, July 13 in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor) about building a collectible angling library.
 
This event is free and open to the public.
 
During this talk, Alevras will discuss lessons learned during the process of building his own collectible library, as well as tips and strategies for choosing which books to collect and knowing where to find them. He will also share items from his personal collection and the Western Libraries Fly Fishing Collection. Attendees will receive a collectible, limited-edition booklet created specifically for the event.
 
Alevras has been a passionate fly tier, angler and book collector for more than 50 years. He is the author of “Leaves from a Steelheader’s Diary” and numerous magazine articles, as well as three books on angling. After living for a number of years on the Olympic Peninsula, he currently resides in Broomfield, Colorado with his wife Barbara.
 
This special talk is sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources.
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Intersession & Summer Hours

Western Libraries Intersession & Summer Hours

  • Western Libraries will be open during the intersession June 11th - June 20th M-F from 8:30am to 4:30pm, closed weekends.

  • The Wilson North entrance to the library will be closed during this period, but the library will remain accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance.

  • The Map Collection will be open during intersession and summer quarter, M-F from 11am to 3pm.

  • Special Collections and Zoe’s Bookside Bagels will be closed during the intersession and will re-open on the first day of summer classes, Tuesday, June 21st.

  • During the summer session, Western Libraries will be open M-F from 7:30am to 5:00pm, closed weekends.
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James W. Scott Fellowships - Applications for 2017

James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships - Now Accepting Applications for 2017

About the Awards

The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships promote awareness and innovative use of archival collections at Western Washington University, and seek to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Fellowship funds are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. Up to $1000 funding is offered in 2017 to support significant research using archival holdings at WWU’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS), a unit of Western Libraries Heritage Resources.

Fellowship Requirements

  • Applications are accepted from individuals in doctoral programs as well as individuals who have finished the Ph.D.
  • Successful applicants will be expected to spend approximately one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence prior to October 31, 2017. Additional information and detailed guides to collections may be accessed on the CPNWS website.
  • Fellows will be asked to give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit. The audience will vary depending on the time of the year, but may include members of the general public as well as students, faculty and staff from WWU.

Applications

  • Applications are currently being accepted for the 2017 award. The number and size of awards granted annually is determined by the application review committee.
  • Applications may be submitted via mail or electronically and should include:
    • Cover letter
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic
    • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Please send applications via email to Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu or by mail to Ruth Steele, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA 98225-9123. Please enter “Scott Research Fellowship Application” in the subject line of email applications.
  • Funds will be awarded after a Fellow(s) has conducted research at CPNWS and delivered their presentation.
  • Fellowship awards may be subject to taxation in accordance with the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Applicants are advised that they may need a U.S. Taxpayer Identification Number (i.e. SSN or ITIN) to receive funds.       
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The Colonial Problem

The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada 

 

Western Libraries Heritage Resources and the Center for Canadian American Studies are pleased to present Dr. Lisa Monchalin, faculty member from the Department of Criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Surrey, British Columbia, who will speak about her most recent book, The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada, on Wednesday, May 25th from 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Western Libraries Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor). 

 

Dr. Monchalin is of Algonquin, Métis, Huron, and Scottish descent, and she is the first Indigenous woman in Canada to hold a Ph.D. in Criminology.  She has published on topics related to crime prevention and Indigenous people’s victimization, including writing an action brief for municipal stakeholders, which was distributed across many municipalities throughout Canada. 
 
Proud of her Indigenous heritage, Dr. Monchalin is determined to reduce the amount of crime that affects Indigenous people. Her Ph.D. thesis was a case study which involved an extensive amount of research regarding urban Indigenous people and crime prevention. She has published in scholarly journals including the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Crime Prevention and Community Safety: an International Journal and La Revue Criminologie, among others.
 
The Canadian government has framed the overrepresentation and disproportionate criminalization of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system as being an "Indian problem." In The Colonial Problem, Dr. Monchalin challenges the myth of the "Indian problem," and encourages readers to view the crimes and injustices affecting Indigenous peoples from a more culturally aware position.
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