Heritage Resources

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Campus History with Heritage Resources

The Fall 2016 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue we explore Western's 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.campus history, including a timeline of past presidents, the development of the university's physical and built environment, and recollections and reminiscences of former faculty and staff told through oral histories.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.

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Doris Burn Exhibit

Special Exhibit: "Plenty of Things to Do" featuring the work of Northwest Children's Author Doris Burn

A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. She also wrote the much-loved favorites The Summerfolk, and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of other well-known children’s works. 

This special exhibit incorporates manuscripts and artwork, and explores some of the themes and aspects of Doris Burn’s work that have connected with readers across generations. The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC. Additionallydigital version of the Doris Burn exhibit is now available online, as are detailed collection guides to the Doris Burn Artwork and Manuscripts and the South Burn Papers

The exhibit currently on display in the library is available for viewing weekdays in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor) between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., (excluding weekends and holidays), and is also free and open to the public.

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Building a Collectible Angling Library

John Alevras to Speak at WWU on July 13 

 
Noted fly-fishing author and book collector John Alevras will speak at Western Libraries at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, July 13 in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor) about building a collectible angling library.
 
This event is free and open to the public.
 
During this talk, Alevras will discuss lessons learned during the process of building his own collectible library, as well as tips and strategies for choosing which books to collect and knowing where to find them. He will also share items from his personal collection and the Western Libraries Fly Fishing Collection. Attendees will receive a collectible, limited-edition booklet created specifically for the event.
 
Alevras has been a passionate fly tier, angler and book collector for more than 50 years. He is the author of “Leaves from a Steelheader’s Diary” and numerous magazine articles, as well as three books on angling. After living for a number of years on the Olympic Peninsula, he currently resides in Broomfield, Colorado with his wife Barbara.
 
This special talk is sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources.
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Intersession & Summer Hours

Western Libraries Intersession & Summer Hours

  • Western Libraries will be open during the intersession June 11th - June 20th M-F from 8:30am to 4:30pm, closed weekends.

  • The Wilson North entrance to the library will be closed during this period, but the library will remain accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance.

  • The Map Collection will be open during intersession and summer quarter, M-F from 11am to 3pm.

  • Special Collections and Zoe’s Bookside Bagels will be closed during the intersession and will re-open on the first day of summer classes, Tuesday, June 21st.

  • During the summer session, Western Libraries will be open M-F from 7:30am to 5:00pm, closed weekends.
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James W. Scott Fellowships - Applications for 2017

James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships - Now Accepting Applications for 2017

About the Awards

The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships promote awareness and innovative use of archival collections at Western Washington University, and seek to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Fellowship funds are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. Up to $1000 funding is offered in 2017 to support significant research using archival holdings at WWU’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS), a unit of Western Libraries Heritage Resources.

Fellowship Requirements

  • Applications are accepted from individuals in doctoral programs as well as individuals who have finished the Ph.D.
  • Successful applicants will be expected to spend approximately one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence prior to October 31, 2017. Additional information and detailed guides to collections may be accessed on the CPNWS website.
  • Fellows will be asked to give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit. The audience will vary depending on the time of the year, but may include members of the general public as well as students, faculty and staff from WWU.

Applications

  • Applications for the award will be reviewed after April 30, 2017. The number and size of awards granted annually is determined by the application review committee.
  • Applications may be submitted via mail or electronically and should include:
    • Cover letter
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic
    • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Please send applications via email to Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu or by mail to Ruth Steele, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA 98225-9123. Please enter “Scott Research Fellowship Application” in the subject line of email applications.
  • Funds will be awarded after a Fellow(s) has conducted research at CPNWS and delivered their presentation.
  • Fellowship awards may be subject to taxation in accordance with the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Applicants are advised that they may need a U.S. Taxpayer Identification Number (i.e. SSN or ITIN) to receive funds.       
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The Colonial Problem

The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada 

 

Western Libraries Heritage Resources and the Center for Canadian American Studies are pleased to present Dr. Lisa Monchalin, faculty member from the Department of Criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Surrey, British Columbia, who will speak about her most recent book, The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada, on Wednesday, May 25th from 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Western Libraries Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor). 

 

Dr. Monchalin is of Algonquin, Métis, Huron, and Scottish descent, and she is the first Indigenous woman in Canada to hold a Ph.D. in Criminology.  She has published on topics related to crime prevention and Indigenous people’s victimization, including writing an action brief for municipal stakeholders, which was distributed across many municipalities throughout Canada. 
 
Proud of her Indigenous heritage, Dr. Monchalin is determined to reduce the amount of crime that affects Indigenous people. Her Ph.D. thesis was a case study which involved an extensive amount of research regarding urban Indigenous people and crime prevention. She has published in scholarly journals including the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Crime Prevention and Community Safety: an International Journal and La Revue Criminologie, among others.
 
The Canadian government has framed the overrepresentation and disproportionate criminalization of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system as being an "Indian problem." In The Colonial Problem, Dr. Monchalin challenges the myth of the "Indian problem," and encourages readers to view the crimes and injustices affecting Indigenous peoples from a more culturally aware position.
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Heritage Resources Newsletter

The Spring 2016 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue, we explore themes of social justice and activism on campus and in the community, including anti-racism campagins, peace advocacy, care for the environment, and more.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: Joining Hands Against Hate symbol and slogan, courtesy of Arbeit Graphics, available in the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force records at CPNWS.

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Local Poetry 4/20

Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers Presents "Local Poetry"

 

We hope you can join us for a special event featuring local poetry offered as part of National Poetry Month at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th floor).

If you are a Bellingham poet or poetry fan, you may have an idea of what the local poetry scene is like.  But it it’s much more rambunctious and vibrant than you can even imagine. And if you’re new to the scene, this is event is a must!  

 

“Local Poetry” will  feature brief presentations and readings by twelve-plus local poets and project leaders, who will share information about local poetry reading series, venues, publications, publishers, conferences and more. Local Poetry will introduce you to a vast array of resources right in your own backyard.  

 

Partners and presenters include: Dobbie Norris (poetrynight), Elspeth Jensen (Jeopardy), Carla Shafer (Chuckanut Sandstone Writers), Liz Vignali (Kitchen Sessions: Bellingham), Tamar Clarke (Teen Services, Whatcom County Library System), Sylvia Tag (PoetryCHAT), Dayna Patterson (Bellingham Review), Luther Allen (Speakeasy & Noisy Water), Allen Frost (Be Good Rain), Anita Boyle (Egress Studio Press), Chuck Luckmann (Flying Trout Press & The Skagit Poetry Festival).

 

Local Poetry is being offered as part of the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers programs, which are quarterly events featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. This particular event is part of an initiative to build on Western Libraries Special Collections of poetry from local artists, presses, and publishers, which include the work of many Local Poetry contributors.

 

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Archives, Media, and Identity

Using Archives to Enhance Teaching & Learning

How can media history inform our understanding of our current moment? What is the role of media in the construction of identity, social hierarchies, and our understanding of power? Recognizing that archival and primary source materials provide evidence that can help answer these kinds of questions, Professor Helen Morgan Parmett decided to experiment by integrating an upper-class research and writing assignment with resources at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS), a division of Western Libraries Heritage Resources.

 

Last quarter students from Professor Morgan Parmett’s Communications Studies 416 class, “Cultural History of Media and Identity,” spent several hours at the CPNWS to review a variety of primary source archival materials in their consideration of the intersections between cultural history, media, and identity formation.

This was the first time many of these students had ever worked directly with archival materials, and CPNWS staff sought to provide contrasting examples of locally-produced media by also including materials that spoke to the experiences, interests, and voices of traditionally under-represented individuals and groups. For example, in addition to exploring historic issues of more mainstream publications such as the Bellingham Herald, students also examined the Northwest Passage, an alternative newspaper produced from 1969-1986, as well as a range of newsletters and educational materials produced by women’s organizations and LGBTA+ advocacy groups.

Heritage Resources Assistant Archivist for Outreach and Instruction Roz Koester helped facilitate the inquiry process by asking students to consider not just the materials in front of them, but to also think about what was not kept.

 

"Since we so often rely on written documentation to provide evidence of our shared cultural heritage, it's important to be aware that there are stories and experiences that remain untold,” explained Koester. “A lot of records don't get preserved, so, as researchers, you need to not only be thinking about the information that's available in the resources you're using, but also what might be missing. And we should all be thinking about how we can engage those hidden voices in order to preserve a more complete picture of our history."

As a required component of their research and writing assignment, students were expected to contribute to the scholarship of media history and identity found in secondary literature by constructing an original argument based on archival evidence of media influence on the construction Pacific Northwest identities.

 

Professor Morgan Parmett hopes that through this assignment, her students will develop a greater understanding not only of media history, but also of where we are now and how we are currently using media. She emphasized how we can learn much about today by considering the media histories of the past:

 

“For one, they disillusion us from the idea that things have always been a certain way by demonstrating the conflicts, debates, and struggles out of which our current moment emerged,” explained Professor Morgan Parmett. “These histories illuminate the fact that many of the debates we currently have about media and its societal effects are, in fact, not new. Seeing how these debates were resolved in earlier periods may provide insights for how we might move forward into our media futures in more socially just ways.”

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives & Records Management, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together these units provide for the responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.  For more information about how Heritage Resources supports the research needs of students and educators, contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

 

2016 Undergraduate Research Award

Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award Submissions Request - Applications Due April 15th

The Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award is given annually to three students who demonstrate outstanding library research in the writing of papers for Western Washington University college credit courses that were taught during either fall or winter quarters of the current academic year. The Award gives students the opportunity to showcase to their research skills and the valuable work they are doing here at Western!

 

Each award winner will receive $500.00 and publication in Western CEDAR, Western’s institutional repository. Western Libraries invites all undergraduate students enrolled at Western to submit their research papers for consideration by April 15, 2016. Submissions can be representative of any discipline, as long as they include an original thesis supported by ample research, and demonstrate exceptional ability in identifying, evaluating, and synthesizing sources.

 

At Western, undergraduate students have unparalleled access to research opportunities that are supported by faculty mentors. Western Libraries views the research work of undergraduate students as being tremendously valuable, both in terms of the teaching and learning experience the research process creates, and also because of the research outputs students themselves generate.

 

Publishing the winning research papers in Western CEDAR makes them available to anyone in the world, enabling students to contribute to the scholarship of their chosen fields while also participating in the growing global movement to provide open access to scholarship and creative works.

 

In order to apply, students must include with their research paper a 500-700 word reflective essay which explains their research strategies, and details how they used the collections and resources of Western Libraries. Submissions should also include a letter of support from the instructor of the class for which the research paper was completed.

 

If you are a faculty member who wants to recognize the work of your best students, or if you are a student with an exceptional research paper that you would love to showcase and share, we hope you will consider the Libraries Undergraduate Research Award.


Winners will be announced by May 15, 2016 and invited to attend a special reception with their faculty mentors hosted by Western Libraries.  For more information and submission guidelines, please see: http://libguides.wwu.edu/undergradaward or contact Elizabeth.Stephan@wwu.edu.

 

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