Heritage Resources

Appears on the Heritage Resources Page

Digitization of Artists' Works

Washington Rural Heritage Grant Award 

Thanks to a $5,000 Washington Rural Heritage Grant,  Western Libraries will be digitizing the correspondence, photographs, sketches, and papers of three prominent Pacific Northwest artists: Guy Anderson, Charles Stokes and Louis Mideke. 

 

Once digitized, this content will be added to Heritage Resources’ digital collections, as well as the Washington Rural Heritage website, making these materials publicly available for use in research, teaching and private study.

 

Julia Sapin, chair of Western’s Art department, noted the significance of obtaining the Anderson materials.

 

“Guy Anderson was a leading figure in the Northwest School of painting and drew attention to this region through his form of abstract expressionism,” Sapin said. “It is a boon to our library’s collection to have this esteemed gift among its offerings, and Western students, as well as students and scholars from across the country, will be able to make use of this resource and increase their understanding of Anderson’s practice and community.”

 

Western Libraries Heritage Resources is partnering on the project with the Museum of Northwest Art in LaConner and the LaConner Public Library System. Washington Rural Heritage is a collaborative digitization program headquartered at the Washington State Library that brings together unique local history materials from libraries, museums and the private collections of citizens across Washington State.

Contact Person: 
Topics: 

October, Events, Archives, & More!

What's Happening @Western Libraries?

It seems like October is always busy here at Western Libraries, and this fall is no different! We began the month with a Grand Opening celebration of the Research-Writing Studio, and then the very next week marked the beginning of this year's TLA  sessions. 

 

The Dr. Leslie E. Spanel Planetarium has announced their fall line-up with plenty of shows scheduled in October, and Western launched the Campus Equity and Inclusion Forum with a special event held in the Wilson Library Reading Room on October 15th. 

 

Additionally, the compelling photographic exhibition, Canada's Arctic: Vibrant and Thriving, now on display in Special Collections, had a fascinating complementary panel discussion on Oct. 22nd entitled "One Arctic or Many?" during which panelists considered questions of boundaries in the Arctic

You might not know this, but October also happens to be Archives MonthWestern Libraries Heritage Resources Tumblr has been posting new content every day featuring archival content highlighting some of the unique and fascinating tidbits from the history of our region and WWU. For example, did you know Western used to hold a pie-eating contest as part of the "Campus Day" celebration?

October 19-25th is Open Access Week. Observed internationally, Open Access Week is designed for the academic and research community to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access. Check out Display Case Number 2 by the Wilson Library North Doors to learn more and remember that all of the materials in that case are available for borrowing! Additionally, you can glimpse into some of the ways Western is involved with Open Access by exploring Western CEDAR.  

Western Libraries is participating in this year's Fall Family Open House on September 24 by offering special Saturday access to the exhibition of Canada's Arctic, and by hosting open houses in the Map Collection and Special Collections from 11am to 4pm. The Research-Writing Studio will also showcase its services at 3:30pm, while offering refreshments of cider and donuts! The ever-popular Canines on Campus, a certified service animal program, will be available for visits in their usual spot at the end of the Skybridge between the hours of 1pm and 4pm. 

 

Additionally, Garth Amundson's very talented Art 371 students are currently showcasing their visually-striking creative works in the windows of Wilson 3, 4, & 5 East as part of "Fast-Forward Reverse," (available for viewing now through November 4th). 

 

WWU Professor Laura Laffrado kicks off this year's Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers events with a talk on October 27th at 4pm about the talented writer Ella Higginson, who was once quite famous and then nearly forgotten--until now, that is! Trust us, you don't want to miss this special event! 

 

We are also very pleased to share that this year both the Munro Seminar for Civic Engagement and Western's Sustainability Awards celebration are being held in the Wilson Library Reading Room. 

 

And we haven't even gotten to November yet...

 

If you are interested in learning more about events @Western Libraries and the Learning Commons, check out our online events calendar or check out the Library News.

Library Department: 
Archive: 

Laura Laffrado & Ella Higginson

The Beginnings of PNW Literature

Laura Laffrado, an award-winning Professor of English at Western Washington University, will discuss her recent research project focused on early-twentieth century author Ella Higginson on Tuesday, October 27th,  from 4:00pm-5:30pm in Special Collections at Western Libraries.

 

During this presentation, Laffrado will explain how her project to recover the fascinating writings of forgotten Pacific Northwest writer Ella Rhoads Higginson began in Western Libraries Heritage Resources’ collections and ultimately led to the publication of her recent book, Selected Writings of Ella Higginson: Inventing Pacific Northwest Literature.

 

Noted writer and Washington state Poet Laureate Ella Higginson (1861-1940) moved to the town of Sehome (now Bellingham) in 1888, at which time her writing career began to flourish. Higginson was deeply concerned with community and civic affairs, including issues affecting women such as female education and the institution of marriage, and she helped establish Bellingham’s first public reading room and library.

 

Higginson’s poetry and short stories were published nationally by journals including McClures, Harper's Monthly, and Colliers, and her best known work, a poem entitled "Four Leaf Clover," was published by West Shore Magazine in 1890. Laffrado’s book shines a spotlight on this once widely-known and celebrated author, helping to restore Higginson as a significant voice in American Literature.  

 

This special talk is being offered as a “Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers” program. These quarterly events are free and open to the public, and  feature presenters who are authorities in their respective fields who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research.

 

For more information about this event, please contact Western Libraries Special Collections Manager, Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu

Contact Person: 
Archive: 
Related File(s): 

Exhibition: Canada's Arctic

Canada's Arctic: Vibrant and Thriving

Canada’s Arctic: Vibrant and Thriving, a traveling exhibition of contemporary photographs of the Canadian Arctic, is now open at Western Libraries. This unique exhibition offers audiences a brief glimpse into the lives of Northerners, while showing a perspective of the environment and activities that help shape and influence this vibrant region.

 

Canada’s North is a region as vast as it is diverse. Modern conveniences exist alongside thriving traditional cultures in a region that faces both challenges and opportunities. Canada and its partners in the Arctic Council face the challenge of trying to ensure sustainable economic and environmental development throughout the circumpolar region with lasting benefits to the health and well-being of Northerners and Northern communities. 

 

The exhibition is open for public viewing Monday through Friday (excluding holiday closures) from 11:00am to 4:00pm in Western Libraries Special Collections (6th floor Wilson Library) from now through December 11th. A special selection of maps related to this region will also be on display in Western Libraries’ Map Collection (1st floor Wilson Library).

 

Exhibition sponsors are Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University’s Center for Canadian-American Studies; Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada; and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

 

For more information about this exhibition, contact Western Libraries Special Collections Manager, Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu; (360) 650-3193

 

 

Archive: 
Library Department: 
Topics: 

Intersession Hours & Closures

Intersession Hours & Entrance Information 

Western Libraries will be open during the intersession August 24, 2015 – September 23, 2015 Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm, (closed weekends). Please note that the Wilson Library north entrance to the library will be closed during intersession, but the library will be accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance. Western Libraries will re-open the north doors on Tuesday, September 15th, and resume regular hours when fall quarter classes begin on Thursday, September 24, 2015.

 

Special Closures

Special Collections: Closed August 31st – September 11th

Map Collection: Closed August 24th – September 18th

Center for Pacific Northwest Studies: Closed August 25th – September 8th

Music Library: Closed August 31st - Sept 18th

Zoe’s Bookside Bagels: Closed August 22nd - September 20th

Archive: 

Special Collection Donated to Western

New Collection Features Doris Burn Artwork & Manuscripts

Siblings Skye, Lisa, and Mark Burn introduce Librarian Sylvia Tag to a portfolio of Doris Burn's drawings that now form part of the collection donated to Western Libraries.

 

Western Libraries has received a new collection of materials from noted children’s author and illustrator Doris Burn. A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt ) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. Burn also wrote The Summerfolk and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of children’s works that are included in and documented through this donation.

 

Examples of some of the books and materials that are now part of the new collection.

 

The collection is a gift from the Burn family to Western Washington University via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC, and contains first-edition copies of children’s works written or illustrated by Burn, manuscripts and original artwork prepared for titles including Andrew Henry’s Meadow, and a number of unpublished and hitherto unseen manuscripts and drawings.

 

“This donation allows us to preserve the work and legacy of a noted children’s author and illustrator,” said Archivist Ruth Steele. “These materials are an important addition to the unique and rare collections held by Western Libraries.”

 

Skye, Lisa, and Mark Burn share memories of their mother's work with librarian Sylvia Tag and Archivist Ruth Steele.

 

These materials help document the cultural and artistic history of the Pacific Northwest region and were created by an artist and writer who sought specifically to engage with the needs, interests, and creativity of a younger audience. Burn’s work continues to speak to readers of all ages, and since her death in 2011, Andrew Henry’s Meadow has been reissued by Penguin’s Philomel Books. The title has also been published and is presently available in translation in Korea, China and Japan.

 

The collection of materials from the Burn family will be preserved and made available for research and use through Western Libraries Heritage Resources, in association with the Children’s Literature Interdisciplinary Collection, and is a valuable addition to the Libraries’ holdings. The Libraries promotes active use of these holdings by faculty, staff and students and also welcomes community members who may be interested in exploring these and other collections.

Contact Person: 

Western Libraries & Bellingham Pride

This past Sunday July 12, Western Libraries’ faculty, staff, friends, and family came together in celebration of “Bellingham Pride,” something they have done each year since 2013. Representing Western Libraries in the parade and hosting a table at the festival has become an annual tradition that many at the Libraries look forward to and enjoy.

 

“Three years ago, the Western Libraries Diversity Committee felt it was important for us to have a presence at Bellingham Pride to show our support of our students and our community as a whole,” explained Western Libraries Circulation staff member, Amy Sedovic. Sedovic first marched in the parade with her friends in the Whatcom County Library System back in 2009. She noted that this was during the budget crisis, and that they carried a banner that read “Yes Libraries.”

 

“I was so amazed and happy to hear people cheering specifically for libraries, shouting things like, ‘I love the library!’” said Sedovic. She explained how libraries are seen as “open, welcoming, and affirming places,” and that she feels honored to be a part of that tradition.

 

As explained by the American Libraries Association (ALA), Libraries can serve LGBTQ people by ensuring that they are represented in library collections and provided with library services. They also note that as a population which frequently faces discrimination and harassment, LGBTQ people can benefit from access to information and the sense of community libraries provide. Librarian Rebecca Marrall explained that she looks forward to the festival every year because of the chance to connect with the community and raise awareness about the Libraries’ historical and archival collections that feature regional LGBTQ narratives.

 

“I love this event because we meet community members who can see themselves in our collections. Plus, we’re celebrating happiness. Who doesn’t love that?”  Marrall asked.

 

Archivist at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies Ruth Steele agreed with Marrall that Bellingham Pride is a wonderful occasion to showcase some of the unique materials that many people are unaware exist or are unsure of how to access.  

 

“I love the opportunity to help represent Western and Western Libraries at Bellingham Pride,” explained Steele. “Heritage Resources houses some rich LGBTQ archival collections, and every year, we get to connect with individuals who are interested to find out more about these collections, and who later visit the archives as researchers, or contact us about LGBTQ records they would like to donate and see preserved for future generations.”

 

In addition to connecting with new community members, the festival also offers the Libraries a chance to see some familiar faces and reaffirm current connections.

 

“It’s also always a pleasure to revisit with long-time friends of the archives who stop by the Libraries’ table, and we are ever grateful for their support in helping to build and promote awareness of our collections,” Steele said.

 

Staff and faculty at Western Libraries anticipate increased participation in the Bellingham Pride events as enthusiasm for such an important and significant celebration grows. Sedovic encourages anyone at Western who is interested in joining the Libraries to walk with them in the parade next year and she reiterated that everyone is welcome.

 

For more information about the LGBTQ Archival and Primary Source Materials at Western Libraries, contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together the three units provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Archive: 

Women & Fly Fishing

     Molly Semenik Featured Speaker July 8th

Experienced fly fisher Molly Semenik will speak about women in fly fishing on Wednesday, July 8th at 3:00pm at Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor, WWU campus).

 

Molly Semenik began fly fishing when her father gave her his Orvis Bamboo fly rod at age 14. She is a member of the International Federation of Fly Fishers (IFFF) Board of Governors and a certified Master Casting Instructor (MCI) who annually teaches over 400 students through schools, shops, clubs, and shows. She owns “Tie the Knot Fly Fishing” which specializes in teaching current techniques and philosophies around the sport of fly fishing to men and women of all ages. She and her husband live in Livingston, Montana, surrounded by two mountain ranges with the longest of the free flowing rivers – the Yellowstone – cutting through the valley floor.

 

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources and is free and open to the public. 

Contact Person: 
Library Department: 
Topics: 
Archive: 

Temporary Closure of Parking Lot 33G

The Goltz-Murray Archives Building parking lot (33G) will be closed for repair August 10th-13th. Alternate parking can be found in Lots 1R and 22G (see below):

Researchers may temporarily park in the loading zone in front of the building (by the bike racks) while collecting parking permits from the front desk. Please contact building staff if you have any questions (360-650-7534; cpnws@wwu.edu). We apologize for any inconvenience.

Archive: 

Women Photojournalists Exhibit - Extended!

Women Photojournalists of Washington

Originally scheduled to end July 27th, this show has been extended through  Friday, August 14th!

 

Women Photojournalists of Washington (WPOW), an annual juried exhibition made possible by a grant from the National Press Photographers Association featuring the work of women photographers is currently available for viewing at Western Libraries.  A new show is curated each spring and exhibited in a D.C. gallery during the fall before travelling to universities nationwide the following winter and spring. This year’s exhibit, curated by National Geographic’s Elizabeth Krist, features the work of fifteen WPOW members, including the Best in Show image by world-renowned photographer Ami Vitale.

 

The WPOW exhibit is co-sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources and the Bellingham Visual Journalism Conference and is on display in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th Floor) Monday through Friday, from 11:00am-4:00pm through July 27th, August 14, 2015.

Contact Person: 
Library Department: 
Topics: 
Archive: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Heritage Resources