Heritage Resources

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Intersession Hours & Closures

Intersession Hours & Entrance Information 

Western Libraries will be open during the intersession August 24, 2015 – September 23, 2015 Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm, (closed weekends). Please note that the Wilson Library north entrance to the library will be closed during intersession, but the library will be accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance. Western Libraries will re-open the north doors on Tuesday, September 15th, and resume regular hours when fall quarter classes begin on Thursday, September 24, 2015.

 

Special Closures

Special Collections: Closed August 31st – September 11th

Map Collection: Closed August 24th – September 18th

Center for Pacific Northwest Studies: Closed August 25th – September 8th

Music Library: Closed August 31st - Sept 18th

Zoe’s Bookside Bagels: Closed August 22nd - September 20th

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Special Collection Donated to Western

New Collection Features Doris Burn Artwork & Manuscripts

Siblings Skye, Lisa, and Mark Burn introduce Librarian Sylvia Tag to a portfolio of Doris Burn's drawings that now form part of the collection donated to Western Libraries.

 

Western Libraries has received a new collection of materials from noted children’s author and illustrator Doris Burn. A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt ) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. Burn also wrote The Summerfolk and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of children’s works that are included in and documented through this donation.

 

Examples of some of the books and materials that are now part of the new collection.

 

The collection is a gift from the Burn family to Western Washington University via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC, and contains first-edition copies of children’s works written or illustrated by Burn, manuscripts and original artwork prepared for titles including Andrew Henry’s Meadow, and a number of unpublished and hitherto unseen manuscripts and drawings.

 

“This donation allows us to preserve the work and legacy of a noted children’s author and illustrator,” said Archivist Ruth Steele. “These materials are an important addition to the unique and rare collections held by Western Libraries.”

 

Skye, Lisa, and Mark Burn share memories of their mother's work with librarian Sylvia Tag and Archivist Ruth Steele.

 

These materials help document the cultural and artistic history of the Pacific Northwest region and were created by an artist and writer who sought specifically to engage with the needs, interests, and creativity of a younger audience. Burn’s work continues to speak to readers of all ages, and since her death in 2011, Andrew Henry’s Meadow has been reissued by Penguin’s Philomel Books. The title has also been published and is presently available in translation in Korea, China and Japan.

 

The collection of materials from the Burn family will be preserved and made available for research and use through Western Libraries Heritage Resources, in association with the Children’s Literature Interdisciplinary Collection, and is a valuable addition to the Libraries’ holdings. The Libraries promotes active use of these holdings by faculty, staff and students and also welcomes community members who may be interested in exploring these and other collections.

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Western Libraries & Bellingham Pride

This past Sunday July 12, Western Libraries’ faculty, staff, friends, and family came together in celebration of “Bellingham Pride,” something they have done each year since 2013. Representing Western Libraries in the parade and hosting a table at the festival has become an annual tradition that many at the Libraries look forward to and enjoy.

 

“Three years ago, the Western Libraries Diversity Committee felt it was important for us to have a presence at Bellingham Pride to show our support of our students and our community as a whole,” explained Western Libraries Circulation staff member, Amy Sedovic. Sedovic first marched in the parade with her friends in the Whatcom County Library System back in 2009. She noted that this was during the budget crisis, and that they carried a banner that read “Yes Libraries.”

 

“I was so amazed and happy to hear people cheering specifically for libraries, shouting things like, ‘I love the library!’” said Sedovic. She explained how libraries are seen as “open, welcoming, and affirming places,” and that she feels honored to be a part of that tradition.

 

As explained by the American Libraries Association (ALA), Libraries can serve LGBTQ people by ensuring that they are represented in library collections and provided with library services. They also note that as a population which frequently faces discrimination and harassment, LGBTQ people can benefit from access to information and the sense of community libraries provide. Librarian Rebecca Marrall explained that she looks forward to the festival every year because of the chance to connect with the community and raise awareness about the Libraries’ historical and archival collections that feature regional LGBTQ narratives.

 

“I love this event because we meet community members who can see themselves in our collections. Plus, we’re celebrating happiness. Who doesn’t love that?”  Marrall asked.

 

Archivist at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies Ruth Steele agreed with Marrall that Bellingham Pride is a wonderful occasion to showcase some of the unique materials that many people are unaware exist or are unsure of how to access.  

 

“I love the opportunity to help represent Western and Western Libraries at Bellingham Pride,” explained Steele. “Heritage Resources houses some rich LGBTQ archival collections, and every year, we get to connect with individuals who are interested to find out more about these collections, and who later visit the archives as researchers, or contact us about LGBTQ records they would like to donate and see preserved for future generations.”

 

In addition to connecting with new community members, the festival also offers the Libraries a chance to see some familiar faces and reaffirm current connections.

 

“It’s also always a pleasure to revisit with long-time friends of the archives who stop by the Libraries’ table, and we are ever grateful for their support in helping to build and promote awareness of our collections,” Steele said.

 

Staff and faculty at Western Libraries anticipate increased participation in the Bellingham Pride events as enthusiasm for such an important and significant celebration grows. Sedovic encourages anyone at Western who is interested in joining the Libraries to walk with them in the parade next year and she reiterated that everyone is welcome.

 

For more information about the LGBTQ Archival and Primary Source Materials at Western Libraries, contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together the three units provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

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Women & Fly Fishing

     Molly Semenik Featured Speaker July 8th

Experienced fly fisher Molly Semenik will speak about women in fly fishing on Wednesday, July 8th at 3:00pm at Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor, WWU campus).

 

Molly Semenik began fly fishing when her father gave her his Orvis Bamboo fly rod at age 14. She is a member of the International Federation of Fly Fishers (IFFF) Board of Governors and a certified Master Casting Instructor (MCI) who annually teaches over 400 students through schools, shops, clubs, and shows. She owns “Tie the Knot Fly Fishing” which specializes in teaching current techniques and philosophies around the sport of fly fishing to men and women of all ages. She and her husband live in Livingston, Montana, surrounded by two mountain ranges with the longest of the free flowing rivers – the Yellowstone – cutting through the valley floor.

 

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources and is free and open to the public. 

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Temporary Closure of Parking Lot 33G

The Goltz-Murray Archives Building parking lot (33G) will be closed for repair August 10th-13th. Alternate parking can be found in Lots 1R and 22G (see below):

Researchers may temporarily park in the loading zone in front of the building (by the bike racks) while collecting parking permits from the front desk. Please contact building staff if you have any questions (360-650-7534; cpnws@wwu.edu). We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Women Photojournalists Exhibit - Extended!

Women Photojournalists of Washington

Originally scheduled to end July 27th, this show has been extended through  Friday, August 14th!

 

Women Photojournalists of Washington (WPOW), an annual juried exhibition made possible by a grant from the National Press Photographers Association featuring the work of women photographers is currently available for viewing at Western Libraries.  A new show is curated each spring and exhibited in a D.C. gallery during the fall before travelling to universities nationwide the following winter and spring. This year’s exhibit, curated by National Geographic’s Elizabeth Krist, features the work of fifteen WPOW members, including the Best in Show image by world-renowned photographer Ami Vitale.

 

The WPOW exhibit is co-sponsored by Western Libraries Heritage Resources and the Bellingham Visual Journalism Conference and is on display in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th Floor) Monday through Friday, from 11:00am-4:00pm through July 27th, August 14, 2015.

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'1812' Exhibit Extended

 

Western Libraries is pleased to announce the compelling 1812 exhibit originally scheduled to end May 29th has been extended. Heritage Resources and the Center for Canadian-American Studies have co-sponsored a traveling exhibit commemorating the recent Bicentennial of the War of 1812.

 

The exhibit will be available for viewing during the hours the library is open from Monday, June 15th through Thursday, August 20th in the Wilson Library 4th Floor Rotunda area.

 

Curated by the Canadian War Museum and delivered to Western through the Canadian Consulate in Seattle, ‘1812’ presents a new and dramatic account of the War of 1812 as seen through the eyes of its Canadian, American, British, and First Peoples participants, giving viewers a broad overview of these multiple perspectives using text, images, and graphic design.

 

For more information on the exhibit, please contact Special Collections Manager Tamara Belts at Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu or (360) 650-3193.

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Heritage Resources Newsletter

The Spring/Summer 2015 "Outdoor Recreation" edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! This issue features stories about rich and engaging resources from all three Heritage Resources programs, including Associated Students documentation on the history of several of Western's recreational facilities, books and artifacts in the Fly Fishing Collection, and photographs and newsletters from the Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Images - top: Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club records, CPNWS; right: Viking Union Facilities Office records, UARM.

 

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Ron Judd May 5th

 

As part of Western Libraries ongoing Heritage Resources Speaker Series, veteran Seattle Times reporter Ron Judd will discuss the successful 1939 ‘Red Scare’ political campaign to remove former Western Washington College of Education President Charles H. Fisher from office. The event  is free and open to the public, and will take place Tuesday, May 5th from 4 -5:30pm in the Reading Room (Wilson Library 4 Central).

 

Judd’s talk, “The Liberal Arts on Trial in Bellingham: The Inside Story and Legacy of the 1939 ‘Red Scare’ Firing of College President Charles H. Fisher,” will explore Fisher’s ousting in the context of local and national anti-communist, “super-patriot” political trends of the times which placed Fisher squarely in the crossfire of a prolonged, bitter political war between New Deal liberals and old-guard conservatives in Bellingham. Judd will also examine whether the forced removal of Fisher by radical political operatives could happen in Washington state today.

 

Judd’s original historical research was based extensively on primary documents which survive in Western Libraries Heritage Resources’ collections. The University Archives, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and Special Collections each house archival collections of pamphlets, news stories, detailed notes, letters, transcripts, and other accounts of assemblies, lectures, and college events documenting Fisher’s career and demise – including what may be the only known copy of a typed transcript of a 1935 closed-door meeting in which Fisher, his accusers, and the Board of Trustees met face-to-face.

 

Ron C. Judd is a Journalism instructor at Western Washington University, a Western alumnus, and a 2015 James W. Scott Research Fellow at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (a program of Western Libraries Heritage Resources). Author of several works of nonfiction, Judd’s work includes outdoor guides and a history of the Winter Olympics. Judd has 25 years of experience as a journalist and currently writes a news column, called The Wrap, for The Seattle Times. He lives with his wife in Bellingham.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives & Records Management, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

 
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Mongolia Days 2015 (May 5th-6th)

Western Washington University is hosting a 2-day celebration of Mongolia during its upcoming “Mongolia Days,” to be held May 5-6 on Western’s campus. All Mongolia Days events are free and open to the public.

 

Western’s longstanding commitment to Mongolian Studies education is exemplified by Western Libraries’ unparalleled collection of Mongolian materials, and attendees are invited to join special guests from Mongolia for a series of programs designed to highlight and celebrate the Mongolia Collection at Western Libraries, Western’s partnerships with Mongolian universities, and Western’s community connections.

 

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5, featured speaker Charles Krusekopf – executive director of the American Center for Mongolian Studies and director and associate professor of the Royal Roads University School of Business in Victoria, British Columbia – will give a talk in the Library Presentation Room (Wilson Library 164F) entitled “Natural Resource Development in Mongolia – The Impacts on Culture, Environment, and Government.”

 

Since the mid-2000s the Mongolian economy has boomed, fueled by the development of the coal, copper and gold mining industries. This session will examine the impact the natural resource boom over the last decade has had on Mongolia’s political system and government, the natural environment, and tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

 

At 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 6 in Western’s Old Main Theatre, the “Mongolian Celebration,” will feature opening remarks by Acting Consul General Dorj Bayarkhuu, the Mongolian Consulate of San Francisco, and performances by celebrated Mongolian musicians Adilbish Badmaanyambuu and Bold Chimedregzen. The celebration concludes that same evening at 7 p.m. with a special screening of “Remote Control,” a film about a runaway living on a roof in Ulaanbataar who finds a lonely woman and embarks on a mission to intertwine their fate. The film won the New Currents Award for emerging filmmakers at Asia’s largest international film festival in 2013, and is being offered as part of Western’s Center for International Studies Reel World Film Series.

 

Mongolia Days are sponsored by Western Libraries, Woodring College of Education, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the Center for International Studies. Programs are made possible by the generous support from Henry G. Schwarz, John C. Street, and Susan Bradbury. 

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