Heritage Resources

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'1812' Exhibit Extended

 

Western Libraries is pleased to announce the compelling 1812 exhibit originally scheduled to end May 29th has been extended. Heritage Resources and the Center for Canadian-American Studies have co-sponsored a traveling exhibit commemorating the recent Bicentennial of the War of 1812.

 

The exhibit will be available for viewing during the hours the library is open from Monday, June 15th through Thursday, August 20th in the Wilson Library 4th Floor Rotunda area.

 

Curated by the Canadian War Museum and delivered to Western through the Canadian Consulate in Seattle, ‘1812’ presents a new and dramatic account of the War of 1812 as seen through the eyes of its Canadian, American, British, and First Peoples participants, giving viewers a broad overview of these multiple perspectives using text, images, and graphic design.

 

For more information on the exhibit, please contact Special Collections Manager Tamara Belts at Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu or (360) 650-3193.

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Heritage Resources Newsletter

The Spring/Summer 2015 "Outdoor Recreation" edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! This issue features stories about rich and engaging resources from all three Heritage Resources programs, including Associated Students documentation on the history of several of Western's recreational facilities, books and artifacts in the Fly Fishing Collection, and photographs and newsletters from the Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Images - top: Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club records, CPNWS; right: Viking Union Facilities Office records, UARM.

 

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Ron Judd May 5th

 

As part of Western Libraries ongoing Heritage Resources Speaker Series, veteran Seattle Times reporter Ron Judd will discuss the successful 1939 ‘Red Scare’ political campaign to remove former Western Washington College of Education President Charles H. Fisher from office. The event  is free and open to the public, and will take place Tuesday, May 5th from 4 -5:30pm in the Reading Room (Wilson Library 4 Central).

 

Judd’s talk, “The Liberal Arts on Trial in Bellingham: The Inside Story and Legacy of the 1939 ‘Red Scare’ Firing of College President Charles H. Fisher,” will explore Fisher’s ousting in the context of local and national anti-communist, “super-patriot” political trends of the times which placed Fisher squarely in the crossfire of a prolonged, bitter political war between New Deal liberals and old-guard conservatives in Bellingham. Judd will also examine whether the forced removal of Fisher by radical political operatives could happen in Washington state today.

 

Judd’s original historical research was based extensively on primary documents which survive in Western Libraries Heritage Resources’ collections. The University Archives, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and Special Collections each house archival collections of pamphlets, news stories, detailed notes, letters, transcripts, and other accounts of assemblies, lectures, and college events documenting Fisher’s career and demise – including what may be the only known copy of a typed transcript of a 1935 closed-door meeting in which Fisher, his accusers, and the Board of Trustees met face-to-face.

 

Ron C. Judd is a Journalism instructor at Western Washington University, a Western alumnus, and a 2015 James W. Scott Research Fellow at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (a program of Western Libraries Heritage Resources). Author of several works of nonfiction, Judd’s work includes outdoor guides and a history of the Winter Olympics. Judd has 25 years of experience as a journalist and currently writes a news column, called The Wrap, for The Seattle Times. He lives with his wife in Bellingham.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives & Records Management, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

 
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Mongolia Days 2015 (May 5th-6th)

Western Washington University is hosting a 2-day celebration of Mongolia during its upcoming “Mongolia Days,” to be held May 5-6 on Western’s campus. All Mongolia Days events are free and open to the public.

 

Western’s longstanding commitment to Mongolian Studies education is exemplified by Western Libraries’ unparalleled collection of Mongolian materials, and attendees are invited to join special guests from Mongolia for a series of programs designed to highlight and celebrate the Mongolia Collection at Western Libraries, Western’s partnerships with Mongolian universities, and Western’s community connections.

 

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5, featured speaker Charles Krusekopf – executive director of the American Center for Mongolian Studies and director and associate professor of the Royal Roads University School of Business in Victoria, British Columbia – will give a talk in the Library Presentation Room (Wilson Library 164F) entitled “Natural Resource Development in Mongolia – The Impacts on Culture, Environment, and Government.”

 

Since the mid-2000s the Mongolian economy has boomed, fueled by the development of the coal, copper and gold mining industries. This session will examine the impact the natural resource boom over the last decade has had on Mongolia’s political system and government, the natural environment, and tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

 

At 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 6 in Western’s Old Main Theatre, the “Mongolian Celebration,” will feature opening remarks by Acting Consul General Dorj Bayarkhuu, the Mongolian Consulate of San Francisco, and performances by celebrated Mongolian musicians Adilbish Badmaanyambuu and Bold Chimedregzen. The celebration concludes that same evening at 7 p.m. with a special screening of “Remote Control,” a film about a runaway living on a roof in Ulaanbataar who finds a lonely woman and embarks on a mission to intertwine their fate. The film won the New Currents Award for emerging filmmakers at Asia’s largest international film festival in 2013, and is being offered as part of Western’s Center for International Studies Reel World Film Series.

 

Mongolia Days are sponsored by Western Libraries, Woodring College of Education, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the Center for International Studies. Programs are made possible by the generous support from Henry G. Schwarz, John C. Street, and Susan Bradbury. 

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Mapping Mars

 

WWU Professor Melissa Rice will give a talk entitled “Mapping Mars - Our Evolving Vision of the Red Planet,” on Tuesday, April 28th from 4:00 to 5:30 pm in the Map Collection (located in Wilson Library 170). 

 

Only 60 years ago, Mars was thought to be a living world, covered with vegetation that changed with the seasons. Then the Space Age first brought a new view of Mars as a dry, cratered and barren planet. But in more recent decades, with mapping efforts by sophisticated spacecraft, our vision of Mars has continued to evolve into that of a complex and fascinating world. 

 

This event is free and open to the public, and everyone is invited to come and learn more about the mapping, science, and exploration of the Red Planet.

 

Dr. Melissa Rice is an Assistant Professor of Planetary Science at Western Washington University, where she teaches in the Geology Department and the Physics & Astronomy Department. Her research focuses on the sedimentology, stratigraphy and mineralogy of planetary surfaces; the current aim of her work is to help constrain the habitability of ancient environments on Mars. She is a collaborator on the active NASA Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity and Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity missions. Dr. Rice received her Ph.D. in the Department of Astronomy at Cornell University. She was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology.

 

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries, The Planetary Society, WWU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, and WWU’S Department of Geology.

 

For more information, contact Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu or call the Map Collection at Western Libraries (360) 650 – 3272.

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Fly Fishing @Western Libraries

What do fly fishing and Western Libraries have in common? You might be surprised at the connections between these two seemingly incongruous things!

Professor Paul Piper, who is also Western Libraries librarian for Special Collections, is teaching a Library 320 Class this quarter, “Fly Fishing in American Literature and Culture.” This class explores both the sport and art of fly fishing in American literature and culture, and considers the implications of fly fishing as a cultural phenomenon on gender, race, and environmental concerns by utilizing the fly fishing collection in Special Collections. 

 

After a student in the class mentioned that he had never actually done any fly fishing and thought he could benefit from understanding something of the physical experience, Piper spoke with two professors who are also sitting in and contributing to the class, Woodring College of Education Human Services Professor Dr. Stan Goto, and Huxley College Environmental Sciences Professor Dr. Leo Bodensteiner, about arranging a time for students to experience what it feels like to cast a flyrod.

 

One sunny Thursday afternoon presented itself as the perfect opportunity for the class to engage in some experiential learning activities to help enrich their classroom experiences. Here are some photos of students gathered together on the lawn in from of Old Main first learning some tips from Bodensteiner, and then practicing their casting skills.  

 

“The students seemed thrilled by the kinesthetic experience of holding and handling a fly rod. In subsequent discussion they talked about how it made the conceptual more real.  Several students said they wanted to further pursue it," said Piper.

 

To see more pictures from Thursday's class, check out the Libraries Facebook page. To learn more about Western Libraries fly fishing collections, which includes: books, periodicals, manuscripts, photographs, artworks, audio and video personal interviews and histories, and fly fishing artifacts such as rods, reels, flies, and fly tying materials, contact: Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

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1812: Special Exhibit

Heritage Resources and the Center for Canadian-American Studies are co-sponsoring a traveling exhibit commemorating the recent Bicentennial of the War of 1812. The exhibit will be primarily in Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor) with some pieces also located on the 4th Floor Rotunda of Wilson Library. The exhibit will be on display and available for viewing from March 30th- May 29th Monday through Friday between the hours of 11:00am-4:00pm (CLOSED Monday, March 25th for Memorial Day).

 

Curated by the Canadian War Museum and delivered to Western through the Canadian Consulate in Seattle, ‘1812’ presents a new and dramatic account of the War of 1812 as seen through the eyes of its Canadian, American, British, and First Peoples participants. The exhibition will give viewers a broad overview of these multiple perspectives using text, images, and graphic design.

 

In conjunction with the exhibit, Dr. Jared Hardesty will give a presentation titled “Expanding our Understanding of the War of 1812: Looking Beyond America’s Border,” on Wednesday, April 15th in Special Collections. This presentation is also being offered as part of Western’s “Active Minds, Changing Lives Week.”

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The Genuine Article

Sandra Kroupa, Books Arts and Rare Books Curator at the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections, will present “The Genuine Article: Reading Artists’ Books,” from 4-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 7th in Special Collections, Wilson Library 6th floor. 

 

In a period of jargon and abbreviation, artists’ books are meant to be consumed fully, every element savored. What is the difference between artists’ books experienced in still or moving images or in a vitrine with books in the hand? What is achieved by the text read with the modulation of the human voice? How does that impact the understanding and reception of the work? Are we experiencing the genuine article or some variation of it? These are questions, perhaps without answers, that Kroupa will discuss in her presentation.

 

Long known for her refusal to define the word “book," Sandra will discuss limited editions, democratic multiples, one-of-a-kinds, altered books and all manner of the book which is presented by artists as a physical form. Her talk will draw from the extensive Book Arts Collection at the University of Washington Libraries and focus on the connections between bookworks by a wide variety of artists.

 

The presentation is free and open to the public.

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Heritage Resources Winter Newsletter

The Winter 2015 "community edition" of Heritage Highlights is now available! This issue features several exciting public programming opportunities, new acquisitions - including the papers of civil rights leader Reverend Robert Hughes and records from the Skagit artists’ community of Fishtown - and recent collaborations with local and regional partners such as Huxley College of the Environment and the Pickford Film Center.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

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Heritage Resources Fall 2014 Newsletter

The Fall 2014 issue of Heritage Highlights is now available! This Teaching and Learning Edition features several new and ongoing initiatives including our inaugural Heritage Resources Speaker Series, a recent class visit to the archives by Environmental Education graduate students, and the availability of records management training to Western’s campus community.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

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