Heritage Resources

Appears on the Heritage Resources Page

Wild Steelhead : The Lure and Lore of a Pacific Northwest Icon

Author: 
Gallagher, Sean M.
Publication Information: 
Mill Creek : Wild River Press, 2013
Location: 
Fly Fishing Collection
Call Number: 
SH687.7 .G35 2013 (two volumes)
January, 2014

This two volume collection of Steelhead lore is a repast for anyone interested in that most mysterious and difficult to catch of all fish, the Steelhead. Concentrating on the Pacific Northwest, this wonderful collection interweaves biology, natural history, interviews, memoir, stories, photographs, techniques, and place in a rich and often startling visual presentation.

Nov. 1st presentation by John Scurlock

Photo of John Scurlock

John Scurlock

Please join us for an afternoon reception and presentation by renowned aerial photographer John Scurlock, who will discuss his efforts to compile photographic documentation of the Cascades. Scurlock, who flies a Van's Aircraft RV6 he built himself, has been photographing mountains and glaciers from the air since 2002. He has provided images for scientists at various governmental departments and educational institutions, as well as for publications such as The American Alpine Journal, Canadian Alpine Journal, Journal of Glaciology, Alpinist Magazine, Ski Journal, and Climbing Magazine. His acclaimed book, "Snow & Spire: Flights to Winter in the North Cascade Range," was published in 2011.

The reception kicks off at 4:00 and Scurlock's presentation starts at 5:00. Please email Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu for more information.

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Heritage Resources offers Directed Independent Study

Western Libraries Heritage Resources offers an exciting opportunity for highly motivated and intellectually curious students to pursue an in-depth course of study that is not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Through independent study students have an opportunity to conduct research in primary and secondary sources such as manuscripts, archives, and rare books managed by the University Archives, Library Special Collections, and/or the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Project proposals may involve the creation of an online exhibit, documentary film, archival finding aid, annotated bibliography, biography, specialized curriculum or specialized teaching/learning tools, a research paper, or other topics or resources as proposed. A prospectus/plan for the work should be submitted in advance of registration.  

Independent study proposals are developed in consultation with a WWU full-time faculty member and/or the Director of Heritage Resources. Interested students should begin consulting with their faculty mentors well in advance in order to develop a feasible project proposal. Priority will be given to thoughtful, structured topics that are not offered elsewhere in the undergraduate or graduate curriculum. Independent study requires that students design their own courses, create their own syllabi, and work closely with faculty mentors. Supervising professors will donate a great deal of time and effort, so students applying for independent study should be similarly committed to the project. Students must be in residence in order to undertake independent study projects. A three-credit independent study should involve at least one hour of student-faculty contact plus an additional eight hours of work per week.  It is also possible to elect two or four credit hours with appropriate changes in workload. The number of candidates accepted each quarter will vary, based on available resources and supervisory capacity.

To apply: 

  • Pick up a Directed Independent Study Permit from Connie Mallison in the Library Administration Office, 231 Haggard Hall. 
  • Working with your faculty member and member of the Heritage Resources staff, complete the permit form and attach a one-page abstract that describes goals and objectives of the Independent Study,  the desired projected learning outcomes and your qualifications to undertake the proposed project, any required resources, the expectations of the faculty supervisor, and  proposed evaluation criteria.
  • Submit your proposal to the Director of Heritage Resources and your faculty mentor for final approval.
  • Have the supervising faculty member sign the application permit.  The student will submit the permit form to the Registrar.

All proposals submitted by the Add/Drop deadline will be considered.

Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
Recommendation of an instructor from the student’s department; permission from the chair of student’s department and the Director of Heritage Resources.

For additional information, please contact Elizabeth Joffrion, Director of Heritage Resources, Western Libraries (360-650-3283 or Elizabeth.Joffrion@wwu.edu ).

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Nov. 1st presentation by John Scurlock

Photo of John Scurlock

John Scurlock

Please join us for an afternoon reception and presentation by renowned aerial photographer John Scurlock, who will discuss his efforts to compile photographic documentation of the Cascades. Scurlock, who flies a Van's Aircraft RV6 he built himself, has been photographing mountains and glaciers from the air since 2002. He has provided images for scientists at various governmental departments and educational institutions, as well as for publications such as The American Alpine Journal, Canadian Alpine Journal, Journal of Glaciology, Alpinist Magazine, Ski Journal, and Climbing Magazine. His acclaimed book, "Snow & Spire: Flights to Winter in the North Cascade Range," was published in 2011.

The reception kicks off at 4:00 and Scurlock's presentation starts at 5:00. Please email Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu for more information.

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Heritage Resources to host presentation by 2012-2013 James W. Scott Fellow Dr. Mary Erickson

 KVOS Records 10/16, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

KVOS Records 10/16, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

Please join us on Thursday, Sept. 26th, for a presentation by University of Oregon professor and 2012-2013 James W. Scott Fellow Dr. Mary Erickson. The presentation, titled "Bordering an Industry: KVOS-TV and Canawest Film Productions in the Pacific Northwest," will give insight into the cross-border design of those companies' roles in producing audio-visual material in the 1960s and 1970s. Drawing on the archival collections of KVOS-founder Rogan Jones and the KVOS television station (both housed at WWU's Center for Pacific Northwest Studies), this preliminary research begins to establish KVOS' contibution to local filmmaking in northwest Washington and southwest British Columbia.

This free event will take place from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in Special Collections on the 6th floor of Wilson Library.

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Change to Opening Hours (Wednesday 18 September)

Please note that the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies and University Archives & Records Center will open at the later time of 10:45am on Wednesday 18th September. This is to allow all program staff to attend the WWU Fall Convocation and Awards Ceremony.

Western Libraries' Special Collections will open for research at the regular time of 11am.

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2013-2014 James W. Scott Research Fellowships

Western Washington University’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies welcomes applications for the James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowships, established to promote awareness and use of archival collections at WWU and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. The fellowships are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies is a program of Western Libraries' Heritage Resources, located in the Goltz-Murray Archives Building.

About the Fellowships: 

Two awards of $500 each will be granted during 2013-2014 to scholars who propose to undertake significant research using archival holdings at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS):

  1. An award to a junior scholar (those in graduate programs or who have finished the Ph.D. within the last two years and/or are relatively new to the field of historical research and writing).
  2. An award to a senior scholar (generally published authors or those more than three years out from the Ph.D.).

Fellowship Requirements:

  • Fellows will be expected to spend approximately one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence at CPNWS prior to September 1, 2014. Additional information about CPNWS collections is available at:  http://library.wwu.edu/cpnws
  • Fellows will be asked to give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit.  The audience will vary depending on the time of the year, but may include members of the general public as well as area students, faculty and staff.
  • After completing their residency, Fellows must submit a brief (300-500 word) written statement describing their research and use of CPNWS holdings to support scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. This statement may be quoted from and/or otherwise published by Western Washington University.

Applications:

Applications may be submitted via mail or electronically and should include:

  • Cover letter
  • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic.
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Two letters of recommendation.

Please mark applications “Scott Research Fellowship Application” and submit either by mail to Ruth Steele, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA 98225-9123 or by email to Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu

Applications will be reviewed after September 13, 2013, with announcements of awards expected in October 2013. If there are insufficient applications in both fellowship categories, two awards may be granted in the same category. Funds will be awarded after a Fellow(s) has conducted her/his research at CPNWS and delivered their presentation and written statement.

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Western Connections presents Dr. Polly Myers: Nuclear Fears and Anti-Nuclear Protest in the Pacific Northwest

Skagitonians Concerned About Nuclear Power Plant Records, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Heritage Resources

Skagitonians Against Nuclear Power Plant Records, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Heritage Resources

Village Books and Western Washington University Libraries are pleased to present Western Connections, a brown bag speaker series highlighting the expertise of WWU faculty and staff. The next presenter in the series will be Dr. Polly Myers, a History Instructor at Western and 2012-2013 James W. Scott Senior Fellow for WWU Libraries’ Heritage Resources Department. Dr. Myers will talk about how people in the Pacific Northwest responded to the potential dangers of the nuclear age. Topics covered will include the institution of civil defense programs, debates over a proposed nuclear power plant in the Skagit Valley, and reactions to Boeing’s production of cruise missiles. Bring your lunch and join us at Village Books on Tuesday, June 11th between noon and 1:00 p.m. for this engaging presentation and discussion.

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