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Skye Burn: "The Strength of a Dream"

Skye Burn Talk to Launch WWU Exhibit on the Life and Work of Award-Winning Children’s Author and Illustrator Doris Burn

Local author and multi-dimensional artist Skye Burn will speak about the life and legacy of her mother, award-winning children’s author and illustrator Doris Burn, at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, October 11th in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor). The event is free and open to the public.
 
Skye Burn has worked locally and internationally in the domains of art-infused leadership, social artistry, art-based social change, leadership education and community development. She is co-founder and former director of The Flow Project, a nonprofit organization offering research and education in art-infused leadership, and has served in multiple capacities on UNESCO-sponsored projects and initiatives.
 
During her presentation, entitled “The Strength of a Dream: A Daughter’s Portrait of a Northwest Children’s Author,” Skye Burn will provide a portrait of family stories, impressions, and memories of Doris Burn, including how her mother came to realize her life-long dream of becoming a children’s author and illustrator.
 
The event marks the launch of an exhibit featuring original manuscripts and artwork created by Doris Burn which will open at Western Washington University on Monday, October 3rd and will run through March 10th, also in Western Libraries Special Collections. It will be available for viewing weekdays between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., excluding weekends and holidays, and is also free and open to the public.
 
A long-time resident of the San Juan Islands, Doris (Wernstedt) Burn authored and illustrated the 1965 classic Andrew Henry’s Meadow, which won the Washington Governor’s Art Award. She also wrote the much-loved favorites The Summerfolk, and The Tale of Lazy Lizard Canyon, and served as illustrator for a range of other well-known children’s works.
 
The exhibit incorporates manuscripts and artwork, and explores some of the themes and aspects of Doris Burn’s work that have connected with readers across generations. The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC.
 

The talk is being offered as a Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program, which are quarterly events featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields and who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. 

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Gloria Burgess: I'll Fly Away

Gloria Burgess to Present "I'll Fly Away: A Sojourn Through Poetry and Spirituals"

Award-winning poet, performer and distinguished scholar Gloria Burgess will explore the rich heritage of African-American spirituals and poetry at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 4 in Room 16 of Western Washington University’s Performing Arts Center.The presentation is free and open to the public.

During this interactive presentation, Burgess will discuss the literary and artistic forms of spirituals and poetry that tied communities together socially and artistically during slavery, and continue to enrich the multicultural fabric of our state today through the work of contemporary African-America poets, musicians and artists. This sojourn through words and music will cover the sometimes hidden meanings of specific spirituals and poems, including how the art helped people cope as they were transported from one continent, and one culture, to another.

Burgess has presented keynotes, master classes, and artistic tributes focusing on African-American, African, and other oral traditions for over 30 years. She has presented, consulted, and performed in a variety of venues, including Carnegie Hall, the Washington National Cathedral, the Kenyan Parliament, and the South African Embassy in Switzerland. Burgess holds a doctorate in Performance Studies from the University of Southern California, and has served as regular and visiting faculty at universities in Washington and California. She is a Poetry Fellow with Cave Canem, a prestigious collective of poets and writers of the African diaspora, sponsored by the American Academy of Poets.

This special talk is presented by Humanities Washington, which offers a roster of cultural experts and scholars who provide low-cost, high-quality public presentations across the state, encouraging audiences to think, learn, and engage in conversation. The event is being co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Western Washington University Departments of English, Liberal Studies, and Music.

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Celebration of Jack Prelutsky

Performance by Poet and Musician Jack Prelutsky: Oct.1

Jack Prelutsky will perform musical poetry from 4:30 -5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 1 in Western Libraries’ Reading Room (Wilson Library 4th floor) at Western Washington University. This event is free and open to the public.

In 2006, the Poetry Foundation designated Jack Prelutsky as the nation’s first Children’s Poet Laureate. Prelutsky is best known for his humorous and imaginative verse, and has published over 70 books of poetry.

While Prelutsky has been making words rhyme for more than 45 years, his career began as a folk singer in coffeehouses with uncertain aspirations of becoming an operatic tenor. Music is deeply entwined with his poetry, and he will perform musical poetry as part of this very special event.  

Jack celebrates the family: Dad, Mother, Baby Brother, and the family dog (who’s clearly a genius), during this performance of recited and sung poems. Jack will also pique the imagination with fanciful creatures, such as the “Radishark” and the “Umbrellaphant.” Then, when everyone’s ready for ANYTHING, his final poem offers an unlikely choice for lunch—hope no one’s hungry!

This special talk is presented by WWU Western Libraries PoetryCHaT, part of the Children’s Literature Interdisciplinary Collection, at Western Libraries.  Complimentary parking for this event is available near the library, in Lot 14G​.

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Help with Citations!

Summer Citation Clinic July 27th

While it is true that any time is citation time in the Research-Writing Studio, you can also pick up handouts and get some extra help with all of your citation needs during the Summer Quarter Citation Clinic! 

 
 
Having trouble with difficult online citations? Wondering how to cite a source within a source?
 
 
Stop by the Citation Clinic which will be held near the Learning Commons Info Desk (Wilson Library, 2nd Floor) any time between 9am and 4pm on Wednesday, July 27th for answers to all of your citation questions!
 
 
Join us to learn some tips and tricks, or just drop in for one-on-one assistance with your citation needs. We can help you with APA, Chicago/Turabian, MLA, or any other citation style.
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A Plastic Ocean

Jo Ruxton to Discuss A Plastic Ocean June 29

 
Jo Ruxton will speak at Western Washington University at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, June 29 at Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th Floor) about the human-caused environmental problem of plastic pollution, and the serious detrimental effects of plastics in the oceans.  This event is free and open to the public.
 
During this talk, Ruxton will provide an overview of the problem with plastics, show clips from the soon-to-be-released documentary, “A Plastic Ocean,” and tell behind-the-scenes stories about the making of this film. She will also offer information about positive actions people can take to address the daunting problem of plastic pollution.
 
Ruxton is both a film producer and a co-founder of the environmental organization based in the UK known as the Plastic Ocean Foundation. She joined the BBC Natural History Unit in 1997 after working for the World Wildlife Fund in Asia for seven years, and was part of the celebrated “The Blue Planet” team.
 
After leaving the BBC, Ruxton joined an expedition to the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the North Pacific Gyre 1,500 miles off the coast of San Francisco, which discovered free-floating microplastics instead of an anticipated solid mass that could be contained. She then began fundraising to film a documentary focused on the problem of plastic.
 
Photo by David Jones, courtesy of "A Plastic Ocean"

 

“A Plastic Ocean” is scheduled for international release in September 2016, and Ruxton hopes to take its message forward through education and conservation programs. She gives presentations around the world to students of all ages, and to businesses and corporations to raise awareness of this issue.
 
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Only Yesterday - Tonight!

Masters of Japanese Cinema - Only Yesterday 

 
The last Masters of Japanese Cinema film for this season is Takahata Isao’s 1991 feature Only Yesterday.  It will screen on Tuesday, June 7th at 6:30 pm at the  Pickford Film Center, 318 Bay Street.
 
Most people will know Takahata from his searing 1988 film Grave of the Fireflies, a film that originally screened as a double feature with My Neighbor Totoro. Only Yesterday has only recently been made available in the US, 25 years after its initial release, making it one of the least-known Studio Ghibli films in this country.  
 
A coming of age story,  Only Yesterday is about a young woman named Taeko who is 27 and living in Tokyo when she chooses to spend her vacation working on a farm belonging to her sister’s in-laws.  While preparing for her trip, memories of when she was in fifth grade return to her, and the  film switches back and forth between the two time periods, even blending them together.  
 
While the film was based on a manga originally published in the 80s, the entire storyline involving the adult Taeko was devised by Takahata, elevating what could have been an exercise in nostalgia into something much richer, thereby creating a subtle examination of being a young adult trying to find one's way in the world, reminding us of the lessons we draw – sometimes mistakenly – from our pasts.
 
Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema is one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series, featuring some of the best films in World Cinema with movies that span both decades and genres. Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Series curator and WWU librarian Jeff Purdue will introduce Only Yesterday, which he explains is his favorite Ghibli film.
 
“If you think you don’t like anime, this is really the one to see,” stated Purdue. “In many ways, it’s reminiscent of classic films by Ozu and Naruse.  This seems to be an intentional homage, since the film’s credits play over a drawn version of the burlap backgrounds that Ozu used in most of his film credits.”
 
To learn more about upcoming films featured in this series, click on this link. If you have questions about the Masters of Japanese Cinema Series, contact Jeff.Purdue@wwu.edu.
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History of Cleanliness

Dr. Kendra Smith-Howard: 2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowship

The recipient of the 2016 James W. Scott Research Fellowship, Kendra Smith-Howard, will explore the history of cleanliness in 20th Century America, including the role and impact of Georgia-Pacific and other regional wood-pulp manufacturers, during the talk “A Messy History of Cleaning Up: Georgia-Pacific and the History of the Disposable Diaper,” at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, June 7 in Western Libraries Special Collections  (Wilson Library 6th Floor).  The presentation is free and open to the public.
 
 
Dr. Smith-Howard holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is an Associate Professor at the University of Albany, SUNY. Her research focuses on 20th century environmental history in the United States, and her first book, Pure and Modern Milk: An Environmental History Since 1900, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. 
 
 
Prior to her presentation, Smith-Howard will spend a week conducting research at Western’s Center for Pacific Northwest Studies as part of the opportunity given to her by the James W. Scott Research Fellowship, during which she will examine archival collections which include records of the Bellingham Division of Georgia-Pacific, and oral histories of the Bellingham industrial waterfront.
 
 
The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowship was established to promote the use of Western’s archival collections and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Funding for the fellowship is awarded in honor of the late James W. Scott, a founder and the first director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest.
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Whisper of the Heart (5/3)

May 3rd Next Masters of Japanese Cinema Film: Whisper of the Heart  

 

The next Masters of Japanese Cinema film is Kondo Yoshifumi’s 1995 film Whisper of the Heart.  It will screen on Tuesday, May 3rd at 6:30 pm at the  Pickford Film Center, 318 Bay Street.

 

Whisper of the Heart is the first Studio Ghibli theatrical feature film to be directed by someone other than Takahata Isao or Miyazaki Hayao. Director Kondo Yoshifumi was an experienced Ghibli hand, however, having worked with the studio from its earliest days. Kondo was responsible for the visual design of Grave of the Fireflies, Kiki’s Delivery Service, and Only Yesterday (which will screen at the Pickford in June). Tragically, Kondo died a few years after Whisper of the Heart was released, meaning that this is his only outing as director.

 

Scripted by Miyazaki Hayao, Whisper of the Heart is like many Miyazaki films in that the protagonist is an adolescent girl who is navigating a moment of change. Unlike Miyazaki’s work however, there is almost no element of fantasy, except for some sequences which are motivated as visualizations of the story that the main character is writing.  In this respect, Kondo’s film is closer to Takahata’s work in its ability to evoke the texture of daily life in Japan.

 

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema is one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series, featuring some of the best films in World Cinema with movies that span both decades and genres. Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Whisper of the Heart will be introduced by Professor of English at Western Washington University, Dawn Dietrich, who teaches classes about anime, among many other topics.  Dietrich is also the Director of Western Reads,  and a Pickford Film Center board member!

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Special Workshops offered 4/27 & 4/28

Giving Useful Instructor Response and Staying Alive

Western Libraries and the Learning Commons are co-sponsoring a special workshop titled “Giving Useful Instructor Response and Staying Alive” this week. The workshop will take place from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 27, and Thursday April 28, in Haggard Hall Room 222. With a focus on how to provide effective responses to student writing, this workshop will highlight  tools and available technologies, in conjunction with principles and promising practices for giving effective response.  Participants will also be given the opportunity to apply these resources to their own individualized contexts. 

Registration is requested but  not required, and to sign up online, please go to:  http://cii.wwu.edu/cii/forms/rsvp/.

Co-facilitated by Carmen Werder & Justina Brown, this special workshop is being offered by the Learning Commons partners Writing Instructional Support and the Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment. 

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Not If But When

The Palliative Care Institute, Woodring College of Education, the Student Washington Education Association, the Whatcom County Library System and Western Libraries are collaborating to share information about some of the great books that open the doors for conversations about death and loss with children and youth. We hope you can join us for this special event on Wednesday, April 27th at 4:30pm.  

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