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Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community

The Spring 2017 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue you will learn about a variety of Heritage Resources' collections which document local and regional artistic culture, including the digitized correspondence of Skagit County artists, photographs and oral histories related to campus sculpture, and a recent donation of valuable photography books.

Heritage Resources consists of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: Isamu Noguchi at the dedication ceremony for Skyviewing Sculpture, 1969, Campus History Collection, Special Collections.

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Jewell Parker Rhodes April 19 & 20

Award-winning author & teacher Jewell Parker Rhodes visits Bellingham April 19 & 20

Award-winning youth and adult author and teacher Jewell Parker Rhodes will discuss her powerful novels, Towers Falling and Ninth Ward, at two free presentations in Bellingham.
 
Rhodes will speak at Bellingham Public Library on April 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and at the Whatcom Museum on April 20, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
 
Hear Rhodes discuss her powerful, insightful novels and learn more about navigating difficult concepts, events, and conversations through story. Rhodes' books and presentations are recommended for everyone from upper elementary school age through adults. 
 
Dr. Jewell Parker Rhodes is the author of the Louisiana Girls children's book trilogy, which includes Ninth WardSugar, and Bayou Magic. Her children's books have received the Parents' Choice Foundation Award and the Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award, among others. Towers Falling, her new middle grade novel, was published in 2016. She is also the author of six adult novels, a memoir, and two writing guides. Her adult literary awards include the American Book Award, the National Endowment of the Arts Award in Fiction, and others. 
 
These events are co-sponsored by Village Books, Bellingham Public Library, Western Washington University Libraries, and the Whatcom Museum, with funding support from Friends of the Bellingham Public Library. (Additional thanks to Rhodes, who has committed to donating her speaking fees toward the purchase of new books for local schools.)
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'Rising Tide in Cascadia' extended

Western Libraries Art Exhibit Extended

"Rising Tide in Cascadia" (Galleries 2 & 4) was created to promote awareness of the effects of climate change and recently appeared at the Mindport Museum on Holly Street in Bellingham.

This exhibit features framed and matted pairs of photographs of local landmarks with the first photo of each pair showing a recognizable local landmark in its current state combined with a second photo that shows what landmark will look like if we fail to take action against climate change. This exhibit will be on display from now through May 20, 2017.*  *This exhibit has been extended and will remain on display through August 18, 2017.

The creators of this exhibit are Alan Sanders and Warren Sheay. Sanders has been a professional photographer for the past 4 decades and has taught at the University of Alaska and Western Washington University. Sanders currently conducts workshops at Whatcom Community College and performs digital imaging at the Quicksilver Photo Lab in Bellingham.  By undertaking the significant technical challenges of this project, Sanders demonstrated his firm commitment to help educate people about climate change.  

Sheay has also been an educator for many years and is also a self-described “average citizen concerned about climate change.”  After reading Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything, he was inspired to help create a local statement that would foster awareness about “our planet’s precarious condition.”  

 

 

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Writing Instruction Support Opportunities April 6 / May 5

Upcoming Writing Instruction Support Events

Avoiding Assignments from Hell  Join us for refreshments and discussion on the topic of problem assignments at the second "Research-Writing Happy Hour," Thursday, April 6 from 4-5pm in Western Libraries Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor). Guest speakers will include the Director of Writing in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, Roberta Kjesrud, and a panel of student Studio assistants. Together they will provide composite examples of problem writing assignments that have come through the Studio at WWU, such as:
 
o   The Long and the Short (What's the Goldilocks length?)
o   The Angry Diatribe (Where's the line between guidance and venting?)
o   The Sorry, Not This Term (How far should a challenge go? What can you do when your discipline demands extensive original research, but you only have a ten-week quarter in which to assign and evaluate it?)
 
Reading & Discussion: Roots of Rhetoric and Writing in the Liberal Arts This event takes place off-campus at Aslan Brewery (this is a child-friendly location--if you have kids, bring them along!) on Friday April 21, Friday, May 5 4:15-5:15pm.  Join us for an informal discussion of some of the oldest writing on rhetoric and education, Gorgias's "The Encomium of Helen" and "On What is Not or On Nature," and together we’ll consider questions like:
 
o   What purpose should the study of rhetoric and writing serve in a liberal arts curriculum?
o   Is writing a practical skill? A philosophical discipline for the pursuit of wisdom? 
 

RSVPs for both events are appreciated but not required. Please send comments and questions to Julie Dugger, Director of Writing Instruction Support.  Unable to come, but interested in the topic? Click on the link for more: https://collegelevelwritingdrafts.wikispaces.com/file/view/Muriel+Harris.doc

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Western Tableaux: Redux

New Exhibit Features WWU History

Western Students Protest Kent State and Jackson State Killings, 1970 / from the Campus History Collection, Special Collections, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University.     

 

Western Libraries Heritage Resources holds vast documentation related to the history of Western Washington University, and beginning March 28, 2017 a retrospective exhibit, featuring historical photographs and other memorabilia illustrating Western’s twelve vibrant decades of institutional life, will bring to light some of these treasures.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and is available for viewing through the summer  in Western Libraries Special Collections Monday – Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed weekends and holidays).

Originally developed for the WWU Centennial Celebration in 1999-2000, the exhibit entitled “Western Tableaux: Redux,” has been updated to reflect Western’s history to the present date. By documenting key events associated with the academic, administrative, and social life of Western, this exhibit unveils pieces of local, state, and national stories.

Through a decade-by-decade series of images, viewers will be able to follow the institution’s trajectory from its earliest days as a normal (teachers’) school, through the expansion of its physical environment and curriculum, and transitions in leadership, programming, and the dynamic and evolving student body.

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Spring TLA Begins April 5th & 6th

Sign Up for Spring TLA Dialogue Sessions

The  Teaching-Learning Academy’s (TLA) at Western Libraries is the central forum for the scholarship of teaching and learning at Western Washington University, bringing together a broad spectrum of perspectives from throughout the university community.

TLA participants, which include students, faculty, staff, and community members, worked collectively throughout fall and winter quarters to create and explore a shared dialogue question that addresses how we can better enhance the teaching and learning environment at Western.

“How do we learn from one another through meaningful dialogue that addresses fear and creates active communities?” is the “BIG” question for 2016-2017. Action proposals that address this BIG study question will be developed during the spring quarter TLA sessions, and anyone interested is invited to attend, whether or not they were part of the fall and winter dialogue groups.

Participants continue to report that the TLA is a great way to connect with others outside of their departments, and to learn more about Western’s teaching and learning culture. Many say it also gives them a chance to take a breath and just listen to what others, especially students, really think. Others express satisfaction in being able to advance real action steps in making Western an even better place to teach and learn.

Sessions begin Apr. 5th and 6th, and meet every other week for a total of four meetings during the quarter. While the sessions are 80 minutes long, attendees are welcome to come for whatever time they have available. Many faculty and staff who cannot stay the entire time will participate for the first 50 minutes, as there is a logical break then.

There are four dialogue group options:

  • Wednesdays noon-1:20 pm (Apr. 5, 19, May 3, & 17)
  • Wednesdays 2-3:20 pm (Apr. 5, 19, May 3, & 17)
  • Thursdays noon-1:20 pm (Apr. 6, 20, May 4, & 18)
  • Thursdays 2-3:20 pm (Apr. 6, 20, May 4, & 18)
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For more information, see http://library.wwu.edu/tla.  To sign up for a regular dialogue group and get on the listserv, email TLA@wwu.edu. (Students: there is also an opportunity to participate in the TLA for LIBR practicum credit. For more information, contact Shevell.Thibou@wwu.edu.)

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Spring Intersession Hours

Western Libraries will be open Monday through Friday during the intersession, March 18th through March 27th, from 8:30am to 4:30pm, closed weekends. The Map Collection will be closed from March 18th through March 26th, re-opening on March 27th. The Wilson North entrance to the library will also be closed during this period, but the library will remain accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance.

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Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Creepy'

'Creepy' @the Pickford Film Center, March 14

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is the 2016 feature Creepy.  It will screen on Tuesday, March 14 at 6:30pm at Pickford Film Center, 1318 Bay Street in downtown Bellingham.  

Before his 2008 film Tokyo Sonata introduced new audiences to his work, Kurosawa Kiyoshi was known as a horror director. His films were not ordinary horror films as they focused more on the complex psychological states of his characters than on delivering visceral thrills. Kurosawa’s current film is something of a return to his roots.

Creepy is the story of a police detective who is an expert in the psychology of serial killers. After a traumatic incident, he leaves the force, becomes a university professor of criminal psychology, and moves to a new neighborhood with his wife where he begins to make connections with a cold case and a new neighbor, both with deeply unsettling implications.

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema series was one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series, featuring some of the best films in World Cinema with movies that span both decades and genres. The Masters of Asian Cinema series continues that rich tradition.

Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Creepy will be introduced by Colleen Laird in Western Washington University’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages.  Laird’s Ph.D. is in Japanese film studies, with a research focus on Japanese women directors.  

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Jonathan Evison: The Art & Craft of Writing

Whatcom READS! hosts Jonathan Evison at WWU

The 2017 Whatcom READS! selection is The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, a big-hearted and inspired novel by author Jonathan Evison. As part of the programming for WhatcomREADS!, Evison will be at Western Washington University on Saturday, March 11 from 2-3pm for “The Art and Craft of Writing” event. This event takes place in Western Libraries Reading Room (Wilson Library 4th Floor Central), and is free and open to the public.

Jonathan Evison is an American writer known for his novels All About Lulu (winner of the Washington State Book Award), West of Here (New York Times bestseller, winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award and the Booklist Editor’s Choice Award) and The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving (currently in development for film).

In 2009 and 2011, Evison was nominated by the American Book Association as “Most Engaging Author.” In his teens, Evison was a founding member and frontman of the Seattle punk band March of Crimes, which included future members of Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. Born in San Jose, California, he now lives on an island in western Washington with his family. His latest novel, This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!, was published in September 2015.

Whatcom READS! is a county-wide program that encourages everyone to read and discuss the same book. Each year, a new book is selected by Whatcom READS organizers. Community members are encouraged to read or listen to the book, share it with family, friends and neighbors, and participate in programs and special events that follow the themes in the book selection. Each series culminates with a visit by the author of the selected book, who makes numerous free-of-charge presentations at locations throughout the county.

Whatcom READS! is organized by all the public and academic libraries in Whatcom County and  community partner, Village Books, with significant funding from Friends of the Bellingham Public Library and Whatcom County Library Foundation, and support from other local businesses and organizations.

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Canines on Campus Return!

"Canines on Campus" Program Visits Western Libraries

Western Libraries will once again be joined by members of the “Canines on Campus” registered therapy animal program from Monday March 6th through Thursday March 16th. 

Teams of humans and animals (which now includes TWO cats, Smokey and Raul!) will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library off and on between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. during both the week preceding and the week of final exams. 

During this two-week period, this space will be reserved exclusively for the registered Canines on Campus therapy animal program, and animals who are not official Canines on Campus volunteers are not permitted in this area. 

Additionally, Western Libraries would like to remind everyone that while ADA service animals are welcome in the library, pets may not be brought into library facilities at any time.

The therapy animals who are part of the Canines on Campus program are registered through several different agencies and have met certain standards of skills and aptitude required for their acceptance into the program. Whatcom Therapy Dogs and Dogs on Call are the two organizations which provide volunteers to the Canines on Campus program.

For more information about the upcoming Canines on Campus visit, a schedule which includes the names of the volunteers, photos of the animals, and the times when they will be available for visiting, will be posted on an easel in the designated gallery area.

Remember to stop by the library to say hi or de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!  

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