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Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Maborosi'

Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Maborosi' March 13

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is Maborosi, which screens at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street).

Maborosi movie poster featuring a woman in the foreground with the word 'Maborosi' stretched across the bottom of the posterMaborosi, Kore-eda Hirokazu's first feature, has gained a reputation as one of the greatest films of the 1990s. Employing an austere yet beautiful visual style, Kore-eda tells the story of a young woman navigating a new life in a new town while trying to come to terms with unresolved issues from the past that threaten to undo her present happiness.

Each film in the Masters of Asian Cinema series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Maborosi will be preceded by an illustrated slide presentation about Kore-eda by film scholar Dr. Linda Ehrlich. Ehrlich has introduced films at the Guggenheim Museum, various universities in North America and Europe, and at the Japan Society in New York City. Her commentary appears on two internationally distributed DVDs and she has written three books and over fifty articles about world cinema.

Dr. Ehrich's presentation is made possible through generous support from Western Libraries, East Asian Studies, the Institute for Global Engagement, the Departments of Modern and Classical Languages, History, Art and Art History, and also the Pickford Film Center.

The remaining films for this year’s series includes Taiwanese filmmaker Chen Kuo-fu’s 2001 The Personals, and also another feature by Taiwanese director Edward Yang, Yi Yi.

For more information about this series, please contact Jeff.Purdue@wwu.edu.

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Canines & Cats on Campus Return!

Canines & Cats on Campus Program Visits WWU

Student petting a dog during a past Canines on Campus visitWestern Libraries will once again be joined by members of the “Canines & Cats on Campus” registered therapy animal program from Monday, March 12th through Tuesday, March 20th. 

Teams of humans and animals will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Mann Family Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library off and on between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. during this period.

For the duration of these visits, this space will be reserved exclusively for the registered Canines & Cats on Campus therapy animal program, and animals who are not official volunteers with this program are not permitted in this area. 

Additionally, Western Libraries would like to remind everyone that while ADA service animals are welcome in the library, pets may not be brought into library facilities at any time.

For more information about the upcoming Canines & Cats on Campus visit, a schedule which includes the names of the volunteers, photos of the animals, and the times when they will be available for visiting, will be posted on an easel in the designated gallery area beginning Monday, March 12th. You can also see a list of specific visit times on Facebook

Remember to stop by the library to say hi or de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!  

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The Art & Craft of Writing with Sunil Yapa

The Art and Craft of Writing with Sunil Yapa, March 10

Black and white photo of author Sunil YapaRenowned author Sunil Yapa will visit Whatcom County March 8-10, where he will be featured in five free events, including “The Art and Craft of Writing,” on Saturday, March 10 at 2 p.m. at Western Libraries in the Wilson Library Reading Room. 

Whatcom READS is a county-wide program that encourages everyone to read and discuss the same book. This year’s title, Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa, is set amid the 1999 World Trade Organization protests in Seattle.

In the book, Victor is grief-stricken after his mother’s death and three years of wandering the world. Longing for a family and a sense of purpose, he believes he’s found both when he returns home to Seattle — until he gets swept up in a massive protest. With young, biracial Victor on one side of the barricades and his estranged father — the white chief of police — on the opposite, the day descends into chaos, capturing in its confusion the activists, police, bystanders, and citizens from around the world who arrived that morning brimming with hope. By the day’s end, they will have all committed acts they never thought possible.

Described as a fast-paced, raw, and absorbing story about conflict and compassion, Yapa pairs deep rage with deep humanity. He asks profound questions about the power of empathy in our hyper-connected modern world, about the limits of compassion, and how far we must go for family, for justice, and for love.

Please join Western Libraries and Whatcom READS to meet with Yapa, and to gain insight into the writing process, as well as tips and inspiration for writers of all levels. Questions about this event? Contact Jenny.Oleen@wwu.edu (360) 650-2613. For more information about additional Whatcom READS events, please see: https://www.whatcomreads.org/events/

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Seeking Scott Fellowship Applications

Seeking Scott Fellowship Applications

2017 Scott Fellowship Award winner Matthew Carr, during his presentation

 

Western Libraries is currently accepting applications for the James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowship. Applications are accepted from individuals in doctoral programs as well as individuals who have finished the Ph.D.

The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowship promotes awareness and innovative use of archival collections at Western Washington University, and seeks to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest.

Fellowship funds are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. Scott, a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region and a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS).

Up to $1000 funding is offered in 2018 to support significant research using archival holdings at the CPNWS. Successful applicants are expected to spend approximately one week examining CPNWS holdings in support of their research, and to be in residence prior to October 31, 2018. Fellows will also give a presentation about some aspect of their research during the course of their scheduled visit.

Applications for the award will be reviewed after April 1, 2018. The number and size of awards granted annually is determined by the application review committee.
Applications may be submitted via mail or electronically and should include:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research plan outlining on-site use of CPNWS holdings and proposed presentation topic
  • Two letters of recommendation.

 

Please send applications via email to Ruth.Steele@wwu.edu or by mail to Ruth Steele, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA 98225-9123. Please enter “Scott Research Fellowship Application” in the subject line of email applications. Funds will be awarded after a Fellow(s) has conducted research at CPNWS and delivered their presentation.

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Citations Why & How

Citations Why & How: A Research & Writing Studio Mini-Workshop

Two people at a table with a computer and some papers looking at a citation reference book.Having trouble with difficult online citations? Wondering how to cite a source within a source? Drop in to the Citation Mini-Workshops to learn the why and how of creating citations. Never be discouraged by a complex citation again! 

Stop by the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, (Haggard Hall 2nd Floor East) on any of the following dates/times:

  • Friday, March 2nd, 11:20am-11:50am 
  • Monday, March 5th, 3:20pm-3:50pm
  • Tuesday March 6th, 1:20pm-1:50pm

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While it is true that any time is citation time in the Studio, you can also get some extra help with all of your citation needs during these sessions. Join us to learn some tips and tricks, or just drop in for one-on-one assistance. We can help you with APA, Chicago/Turabian, MLA, or any other citation style. Questions about this workshop? Contact us at rws@wwu.edu.

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Volunteers Needed

Help Us Improve the Library Catalog

Two people near a computer smiling at each other, one seated with her hands on the keyboard and the other standing nearby holding a clipboard and pen.Western Libraries Usability & Design Working Group is currently evaluating how our patrons search for materials in the catalog and we would love your input!

We are seeking participants for a brief exercise, and undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, and staff are invited to participate. This activity shouldn’t take longer than 15 – 20 minutes.  

When & Where: Sessions will take place within the library between the dates of February 22 and March 21. Please see here for more information about available days and times. Once you’ve selected a time for your session, a library professional will contact you with information about next steps.

Questions about the opportunity? Please e-mail or call Associate Professor Rebecca Marrall, Chair of the Usability & Design Working Group (360-650-4493).

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UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories

UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories

Western Libraries will host a student panel discussion, “The Journeys and Untold Stories of Western Washington University's Undocumented Students," on Thursday, March 1 at 4 p.m. in the Library Presentation Room (Wilson Library Room 164F).  

Please join us for the chance to hear first-hand some of the untold stories from members of the Blue Group, Western's undocumented student club, and to learn about how we at Western can better support undocumented students.

“My  life isn’t a movie, it’s a reality.” Those words come directly from Maria Dimas’ narrative, "America Was Never White," one of the many stories shared in the book, UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories, written by students at Western and published by Western CEDAR.  During this event, panelists will share some of their own experiences and talk about their inspiration for this book.

Undocumented students face a number of pressures and stresses that are unique to their student experience because of their status. UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories, is a collection of essays, poetry, photographs, and artwork created by members of the Blue Group.  

As the Blue Group has grown from just a few students meeting informally into an official Western Washington University Associated Students club, into an organization that is now widely recognized in their local community, members of the Blue Group increasingly receive requests to give presentations to help people understand their experiences as undocumented immigrants and students. Their book is one way these remarkable students are sharing their perspectives and insights with their community.

As stated in the introduction to the book:

“You may read or see a piece in this book that resonates strongly with you, that helps you realize you are not alone. Or you may read or see a piece that causes you to think about something from a new perspective, from a place that challenges you. Or you may read or see something that makes you want to learn even more, something that inspires you to seek out others in your own community whom you can connect with and find ways to support. All of these things are good, and we hope that in sharing these pieces of ourselves, others will feel supported and find ways of giving support.”

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries in collaboration with the Blue Group, whose mission is to provide undocumented students the opportunity to meet other undocumented students, find resources and services, and to build community.

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Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Taipei Story'

"Taipei Story," February 13 @the Pickford Film Center

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is Taipei Story, which screens at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street).

Edward Yang's second feature, Taipei Story, was written by and stars the great Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-hsien. Hou plays a former baseball player whose loyalty to tradition and to friends and family threatens to derail his plans for the future with partner Chin (played by pop singer Tsai Chin).

Employing an understated visual style, Yang crafts a mournful meditation on a changing world and how connections from our past help and hinder us as we try to keep pace.

Each film in the Masters of Asian Cinema series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Series curator and librarian from Western Washington University, Jeff Purdue, will introduce Taipei Story.

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Asian Cinema series continues the rich tradition that began with the Masters of Japanese Cinema series, one of the Pickford's longest running and most popular series.

This year’s remaining film series lineup includes Maborosi, the first feature by Kore-eda Hirokazu, which will screen in March in a newly restored print.  Later in the spring will bring Taiwanese filmmaker Chen Kuo-fu’s 2001 The Personals.  And there will also be one more feature by Taiwanese director Edward Yang: his last feature, Yi Yi.

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When Women Didn't Count

Robert Lopresti to discuss "When Women Didn't Count"

Western Libraries government information librarian Robert Lopresti will give a talk about his recent book “When Women Didn't Count, the Chronic Mismeasure and Marginalization of American Women in Federal Statistics,” from 4:00-5:00pm on Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Western Libraries in the Reading Room (Wilson Library 4th floor Central). The event is free and open to the public.

Lopresti will explore how women’s history has been hidden and distorted by 200 years of official government statistics, and how some of the statistics that have shaped perceptions of American women have often been incorrect or based on false assumptions, essentially misrepresenting the lives of women.

Lopresti’s book traces the development of data on population, employment, crime, health, and many other topics, beginning with the first Census in 1790 when only the male "head of the household" was listed by name. Lopresti examines problems with data and illustrates the importance of using critical thinking when analyzing information, even when that information is from seemingly official sources.

Lopresti is a librarian at Western, working with government information, Huxley College, and Canadian-American Studies. His new book, "When Women Didn’t Count," is the result of four decades of work with government publications. Lopresti is also an award-winning author of several scholarly articles, two novels, and more than sixty mystery and fantasy stories.

This talk is offered as part of the Western Libraries Reading Series program, dedicated to showcasing the scholarly and creative work of Western faculty and staff by featuring diverse speakers from a variety of backgrounds and and disciplines who are engaged in research, writing, and teaching at Western.

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Exploring Medieval Manuscripts

Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers: Kathryn Vulić

WWU Professor of English Kathryn Vulić will give a talk entitled “Exploring Medieval Manuscripts” from 4:00-5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 14 in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor).  Doors will open at 3:30pm for those who wish to stop by before the event to meet the new Special Collections Librarian, Michael Taylor.

The event is free and open to the public.

Using both original and facsimiles of medieval manuscripts held by Special Collections, Vulić will provide an overview of the study of medieval handwriting, manuscript construction, creation and preservation. Her talk will focus on composition, writing, binding, circulation and ultimately preservation, leading us to a better understanding of the medieval processes around manuscript production and use.

Kathryn Vulić (A.B, Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) has been at Western Washington University since 2004 teaching Medieval Literature and Romance, Old Middle English, British Literature, as well as seminars on Chaucer, Chaucer’s England, and Tolkien’s Medieval Sources. She has published and presented papers on the audiences and circumstances of composition of late-medieval writings, medieval understandings of reading and literacy, and the influence of prayer rhetoric and meditative habits on the forms and content of Middle English texts.

This talk is offered as part of the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program. For more information about the event, please contact Tamara Belts, Special Collections Manager, Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu, (360) 650-3193.

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