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Heritage Resources Newsletter

The Spring/Summer 2015 "Outdoor Recreation" edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! This issue features stories about rich and engaging resources from all three Heritage Resources programs, including Associated Students documentation on the history of several of Western's recreational facilities, books and artifacts in the Fly Fishing Collection, and photographs and newsletters from the Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and the University Archives & Records Management. Together these programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Images - top: Mount Baker 'Hiking' Club records, CPNWS; right: Viking Union Facilities Office records, UARM.

 

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Osaka Elegy June 2nd

Masters of Japanese Cinema Series

On Tuesday, June 2nd at 6:30 pm, the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street) will wrap up this season’s Masters of Japanese Cinema series with one of two films that Mizoguchi Kenji directed in 1936 starring the great Yamada Isuzu, Osaka Elegy.

 

This film tells the story of a young woman who sacrifices herself in order to save her father and brother from financial difficulties, and pays the consequences.  Osaka Elegy shocked audiences when it came out for its portrayal of a moga (modern girl) who refuses to apologize for her choices. It made the reputations of both director and star, who would both go on to significant careers.

 

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema series is one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series. Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators.  Osaka Elegy will be introduced by film series curator Jeff Purdue, who is also a librarian at Western Libraries.

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Wayne Richter Receives Prestigious Award

Acting Consul General Dorj Bayarkhuu from the Mongolian Consulate of San Francisco formally presented the Order of Altan Gadas (the Order of the Polar Star) on behalf of the president of Mongolia to Wayne Richter of Western Libraries on May 6, 2015. 

 

This award is the highest state honor given by the president of Mongolia to a foreign national in recognition of individuals who have provided exceptional assistance to Mongolia. Past recipients include Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John McCain, and retired Western Washington University professor Henry Schwarz.  

 

The quality and accessibility of the extraordinary Mongolian Studies Collection at Western Libraries is a result of the generosity of scholars such as Schwarz, Nicholas Poppe and John C. Street, and the valuable work of Wayne Richter. Richter is a nationally recognized expert in the creation and editing of bibliographic records for materials written in Mongolian and related languages, and he is the only cataloger in the United States who routinely creates national name authority records – work which involves considerable research in a field with only limited bibliographic and biographic resources.

Richter is an expert in the highly technical aspects of “MARC” encoding and the representation of non-Roman alphabet foreign language materials in online library catalogs. Using a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, ‘Strengthening Mongolian Language Resources in the United States’ in the early 1990’s, his work with bibliographic records allowed libraries worldwide to discover and request access to resources in the Mongolian Studies Collection at Western.

 

While noted for his great capacity for learning languages, including Mongolian, Uighur and Kazakh, Richter’s passion for the languages and cultures of Central Asia resulted from his undergraduate studies at Western, when he participated in one of the earliest “Western in Mongolia” summer programs. He later attended a Mongolian language course at Inner Mongolia University and then quickly transitioned from learning to teaching, introducing a credit course at Western in “Written Mongolian.”

 

His work in the highly specialized area of national standards for the Romanization of Mongolian and related languages has been recognized during his contacts with the Library of Congress, and the Committee on East Asian Libraries of the Association for Asian Studies. He has either developed or assisted in the development of Library of Congress standards for the Romanization of many languages and scripts, such as the Mongolian script, Uighur, Manchu, and Tod/Oirat/Old Kalmyk Romanization tables.

 

Richter also served as a consultant on the Unicode standards for Mongolian script for the International Standards Organization (ISO), which involved the encoding of Mongolian script for use in computer systems, a project made particularly complicated by the many disparities between modern pronunciation and traditional spellings encoded in Mongol script. Additionally, Richter developed some of the first fonts that allowed the display of Mongolian scripts on personal computers.

 

Richter has actively reached out to people who are interested in Mongolia and its cultures and languages, participates in meetings of the Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, and is in regular contact with Mongolian scholars and librarians from other institutions who use Western’s collections. He regularly coordinates and leads tours of the Libraries’ Mongolian Studies Collection for a wide variety of individuals and groups, including Mongolian ambassadors to the U.S., U.S. Ambassadors to Mongolia, and many visiting scholars. Richter’s work to make resources available to scholars worldwide will impact Mongolian studies for decades to come.

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Sharing with the World - Western CEDAR

Western CEDAR: Sharing with the World

One need only glance at the “Faculty Notes” page of Western Today to get a sense of the depth and range of research, scholarship, and creative works that Western’s faculty are producing. Western CEDAR, Western Washington University’s institutional repository (IR), is one way Western can share these innovative and engaging outputs with the world. Part of a global movement promoting open access to scholarship and creative works, Western CEDAR is a service of Western Libraries, in partnership with the Graduate School, Office of the Provost, and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

 

Since its launch last fall, CEDAR’s implementation team has been working diligently with Western faculty and staff to both create SelectedWorks pages and also add content to the repository that will help make the scholarly and creative work of Western’s community accessible to everyone.

 

“So much is made about the teaching-learning mission of the university. But I’m constantly amazed at the quality and quantity of academic scholarship that is produced at Western. This allows us, in one place, to begin to tell the story of the university’s collective efforts to engage in the production of new knowledge, and to share that broadly,” explained Dr. Francisco Rios, Dean of Woodring College of Education.

 

CEDAR’s Selected Works feature allows faculty from Western to share their work and expand their readership. Articles published in peer-reviewed journals that are added to CEDAR are search engine optimized for maximum exposure, meaning they have the potential to receive increased readership beyond the discipline-specific journal in which they were first published.

 

While one of the goals of CEDAR is to make scholarship available and accessible to anyone in the world, a local benefit of using SelectedWorks is that it provides scholars at Western an opportunity to discover what their colleagues here at Western are researching and creating. Elementary Education Professor Joy Wiggins explained how CEDAR helps connect faculty across the university, enabling them to recognize how their work intersects with other disciplines.

 

"My research intersects with anthropology, sociology, psychology and even political science, and it just makes sense for me to seek research outside of education...We tend to stay encapsulated in our disciplines and respective departments because we are so busy just teaching, attending to service and squeezing in our writing that we sometimes forget to look up from our desks and seek other like-minded folks from different disciplines that bring a whole new, fresh insight to our work. That’s what’s so exciting to me. CEDAR is one way to connect us," said Wiggins.

 

Faculty who create SelectedWorks pages can showcase their scholarly and creative works by displaying them in a customized format organized according to the categories they decide to highlight, (such as: areas of research and expertise, awards and honors, publications, bibliographies, Curriculum Vitae, or lists of links to additional information). SelectedWorks pages also allow scholars to easily cultivate their own network of followers by inviting contacts to join their announcement network, or follow them via RSS feed or email.

 

Environmental Sciences Professor Robin Matthews’ SelectedWorks page includes something entirely unique since she is the author of the very first book ever published in CEDAR, a taxonomy guide to local algae that includes hundreds of high resolution color images. The book can be downloaded electronically to a computer or mobile device, and it was created with active links which make it easy to use.

 

“Putting the book on CEDAR solved a huge problem I was facing: how to make the book accessible to students and other professionals at a low or no cost and without loss of quality. Printing this type of book would be prohibitively expensive, assuming I could even find a publisher interested in the project,” explained Matthews.

 

Not only was Matthews able to create something she uses in her own teaching, she has also connected with others outside of the United States who have told her that her book has helped them in teaching their students algal taxonomy. Currently, publications from Western Washington University's faculty, staff and students, including Western's Masters Thesis Collection, are being downloaded by people from all over the world. CEDAR's website includes a dynamic map that begins with the previous days' downloads before switching to real-time activity, so you can see for yourself the global impact of the work being done at Western.

 

“Ultimately, this is about providing access to the broadest range of one’s scholarship to as many people as possible.  As an educational institution, we have a commitment and obligation to generate new knowledge. But that knowledge, to have impact, needs to be shared with as many others as possible.  And others need to be able to access that knowledge,” said Rios.

 

Cedar’s implementation team at Western Libraries is available to assist you in if you are interested in creating a SelectedWorks page to showcase your work, or if you have any questions about Western CEDAR. Please contact Western Libraries Scholarly Communication Librarian, Jenny.Oleen@wwu.edu or Western CEDAR Manager Kim.Marsicek@wwu.edu for more information.

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Throne of Blood May 5th

Throne of Blood, Akira Kurosawa’s extraordinary rendering of Shakespeare’s MacBeth, is a film replete with great performances.  It will be shown at the Pickford Film Center on Tuesday, May 5th at 6:30pm as part of the Masters of Japanese Cinema series, co-sponsored by Western Libraries.

 

The Masters of Japanese Cinema series is one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series. Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators.

 

The introduction to this film will be provided by Stephen Carlton, who is the founder of the amazing Asian Film Festival of Dallas (you can check out their website here: http://asianfilmdallas.com/).  

 

For more information about this series, contact Jeff.Purdue@wwu.edu, or go to: http://www.pickfordfilmcenter.org/tag/masters-of-japanese-cinema/

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Ron Judd May 5th

 

As part of Western Libraries ongoing Heritage Resources Speaker Series, veteran Seattle Times reporter Ron Judd will discuss the successful 1939 ‘Red Scare’ political campaign to remove former Western Washington College of Education President Charles H. Fisher from office. The event  is free and open to the public, and will take place Tuesday, May 5th from 4 -5:30pm in the Reading Room (Wilson Library 4 Central).

 

Judd’s talk, “The Liberal Arts on Trial in Bellingham: The Inside Story and Legacy of the 1939 ‘Red Scare’ Firing of College President Charles H. Fisher,” will explore Fisher’s ousting in the context of local and national anti-communist, “super-patriot” political trends of the times which placed Fisher squarely in the crossfire of a prolonged, bitter political war between New Deal liberals and old-guard conservatives in Bellingham. Judd will also examine whether the forced removal of Fisher by radical political operatives could happen in Washington state today.

 

Judd’s original historical research was based extensively on primary documents which survive in Western Libraries Heritage Resources’ collections. The University Archives, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and Special Collections each house archival collections of pamphlets, news stories, detailed notes, letters, transcripts, and other accounts of assemblies, lectures, and college events documenting Fisher’s career and demise – including what may be the only known copy of a typed transcript of a 1935 closed-door meeting in which Fisher, his accusers, and the Board of Trustees met face-to-face.

 

Ron C. Judd is a Journalism instructor at Western Washington University, a Western alumnus, and a 2015 James W. Scott Research Fellow at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (a program of Western Libraries Heritage Resources). Author of several works of nonfiction, Judd’s work includes outdoor guides and a history of the Winter Olympics. Judd has 25 years of experience as a journalist and currently writes a news column, called The Wrap, for The Seattle Times. He lives with his wife in Bellingham.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives & Records Management, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support of teaching, learning, and research.

 
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Academic Success Fair

The Academic Success Fair is a half-day working “mini-conference” that connects students to academic success specialists within the Libraries in order to promote academic and research success. 

Each hour will feature different specialists from a variety of areas, as listed in the schedule below: 

 

  • 1-2pm:  Article Databases, OneSearch, and the Tutoring Center
  • 2-3pm: Copyright,  Government Information,  Map Collection, and Heritage Resources
  • 3-4pm:  Citations and Zotero

 

Come with questions or assignments, and leave with the tools that will help you succeed in your academic work!

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Mongolia Days 2015 (May 5th-6th)

Western Washington University is hosting a 2-day celebration of Mongolia during its upcoming “Mongolia Days,” to be held May 5-6 on Western’s campus. All Mongolia Days events are free and open to the public.

 

Western’s longstanding commitment to Mongolian Studies education is exemplified by Western Libraries’ unparalleled collection of Mongolian materials, and attendees are invited to join special guests from Mongolia for a series of programs designed to highlight and celebrate the Mongolia Collection at Western Libraries, Western’s partnerships with Mongolian universities, and Western’s community connections.

 

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5, featured speaker Charles Krusekopf – executive director of the American Center for Mongolian Studies and director and associate professor of the Royal Roads University School of Business in Victoria, British Columbia – will give a talk in the Library Presentation Room (Wilson Library 164F) entitled “Natural Resource Development in Mongolia – The Impacts on Culture, Environment, and Government.”

 

Since the mid-2000s the Mongolian economy has boomed, fueled by the development of the coal, copper and gold mining industries. This session will examine the impact the natural resource boom over the last decade has had on Mongolia’s political system and government, the natural environment, and tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

 

At 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 6 in Western’s Old Main Theatre, the “Mongolian Celebration,” will feature opening remarks by Acting Consul General Dorj Bayarkhuu, the Mongolian Consulate of San Francisco, and performances by celebrated Mongolian musicians Adilbish Badmaanyambuu and Bold Chimedregzen. The celebration concludes that same evening at 7 p.m. with a special screening of “Remote Control,” a film about a runaway living on a roof in Ulaanbataar who finds a lonely woman and embarks on a mission to intertwine their fate. The film won the New Currents Award for emerging filmmakers at Asia’s largest international film festival in 2013, and is being offered as part of Western’s Center for International Studies Reel World Film Series.

 

Mongolia Days are sponsored by Western Libraries, Woodring College of Education, the Center for East Asian Studies, and the Center for International Studies. Programs are made possible by the generous support from Henry G. Schwarz, John C. Street, and Susan Bradbury. 

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Mapping Mars

 

WWU Professor Melissa Rice will give a talk entitled “Mapping Mars - Our Evolving Vision of the Red Planet,” on Tuesday, April 28th from 4:00 to 5:30 pm in the Map Collection (located in Wilson Library 170). 

 

Only 60 years ago, Mars was thought to be a living world, covered with vegetation that changed with the seasons. Then the Space Age first brought a new view of Mars as a dry, cratered and barren planet. But in more recent decades, with mapping efforts by sophisticated spacecraft, our vision of Mars has continued to evolve into that of a complex and fascinating world. 

 

This event is free and open to the public, and everyone is invited to come and learn more about the mapping, science, and exploration of the Red Planet.

 

Dr. Melissa Rice is an Assistant Professor of Planetary Science at Western Washington University, where she teaches in the Geology Department and the Physics & Astronomy Department. Her research focuses on the sedimentology, stratigraphy and mineralogy of planetary surfaces; the current aim of her work is to help constrain the habitability of ancient environments on Mars. She is a collaborator on the active NASA Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity and Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity missions. Dr. Rice received her Ph.D. in the Department of Astronomy at Cornell University. She was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology.

 

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries, The Planetary Society, WWU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, and WWU’S Department of Geology.

 

For more information, contact Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu or call the Map Collection at Western Libraries (360) 650 – 3272.

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Fly Fishing @Western Libraries

What do fly fishing and Western Libraries have in common? You might be surprised at the connections between these two seemingly incongruous things!

Professor Paul Piper, who is also Western Libraries librarian for Special Collections, is teaching a Library 320 Class this quarter, “Fly Fishing in American Literature and Culture.” This class explores both the sport and art of fly fishing in American literature and culture, and considers the implications of fly fishing as a cultural phenomenon on gender, race, and environmental concerns by utilizing the fly fishing collection in Special Collections. 

 

After a student in the class mentioned that he had never actually done any fly fishing and thought he could benefit from understanding something of the physical experience, Piper spoke with two professors who are also sitting in and contributing to the class, Woodring College of Education Human Services Professor Dr. Stan Goto, and Huxley College Environmental Sciences Professor Dr. Leo Bodensteiner, about arranging a time for students to experience what it feels like to cast a flyrod.

 

One sunny Thursday afternoon presented itself as the perfect opportunity for the class to engage in some experiential learning activities to help enrich their classroom experiences. Here are some photos of students gathered together on the lawn in from of Old Main first learning some tips from Bodensteiner, and then practicing their casting skills.  

 

“The students seemed thrilled by the kinesthetic experience of holding and handling a fly rod. In subsequent discussion they talked about how it made the conceptual more real.  Several students said they wanted to further pursue it," said Piper.

 

To see more pictures from Thursday's class, check out the Libraries Facebook page. To learn more about Western Libraries fly fishing collections, which includes: books, periodicals, manuscripts, photographs, artworks, audio and video personal interviews and histories, and fly fishing artifacts such as rods, reels, flies, and fly tying materials, contact: Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

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