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Masters of Japanese Cinema-Sansho the Bailiff - Dec. 6

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

Masters of Japanese Cinema is a new series for Pickford Film Center, shining a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. Curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

   Sancho the Bailiff Movie Poster

 

 

Sansho the Bailiff

Kenji Mizoguchi's masterpiece opens in 11th-century Japan with an aristocratic woman Tamaki traveling through the woods with her daughter Anju, son Zushio, and maid. Through flashbacks, we learn that her husband, Taira no Masauji, was a local governor who was exiled because of his honesty and integrity. Before he leaves, he gives his son an amulet of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, and tells him, "Without mercy, man is like a beast. Men are created equal, everyone is entitled to happiness."

 

 

 

Date: December 6, 2011

Time: 6:30  Visit  http://pickfordcinema.org/page/PlayingPFC.aspx

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Local Poet Paul Piper to read @ Village Books July 28


 Local Poet Paul Piper will read from his new work
Dogs and Other Poems

Thursday, July 28, 7:00 pm.
at Village Books, 1200 11th St. Fairhaven

 

 

 

"Dogs and Other Poems by Paul S. Piper is a collection of poems written over the past two years. The poems are whimsical, funny, philosophical and spiritual, and are influenced by the great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa, and the persona of poems of Robert Aitken (Zen Master Raven), as well as numerous others.  He is currently a librarian at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

Village Books is pleased to carry copies of Paul's latest book, Dogs & Other Poems, as well as copies of his poetry book Now & Then. Please call 360-671-2626 to obtain copies.

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Fly Fishing & Literature Class

LIBR 320: Fly Fishing in American Literature and Culture

Looking for an interesting class to take next quarter?  Professor Paul Piper, who is also Western Libraries librarian for Special Collections, is teaching his popular Library 320 Class spring quarter, “Fly Fishing in American Literature and Culture.”

This class explores both the sport and art of fly fishing in American literature and culture, and considers the implications of fly fishing as a cultural phenomenon on gender, race, and both environmental and ethical concerns.  

The literature is vast, and embraces poetry, fiction and non-fiction in the genres of philosophy, spirituality, environmentalism, and much more.  

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Get Help with Citations

Winter Citation Clinics February 27th through March 3rd

Having trouble with difficult online citations? Wondering how to cite a source within a source? Stop by the Citation Clinic held in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, any time between 2-4 p.m.  Monday through Friday from February 27 through March 3 for answers to all of your citation questions.

While it is true that any time is citation time in the Studio, you can also get some extra help with all of your citation needs during the Fall Quarter Citation Clinic. Join us to learn some tips and tricks, or just drop in for one-on-one assistance. We can help you with APA, Chicago/Turabian, MLA, or any other citation style.

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"The General" & Matt Phelan, Feb.23

Film Event Featuring Graphic Novelist Matt Phelan

 

As part of the WWU Children's Literature Conference, the Pickford Film Center will present a screening of the film The General, on Thursday, Feb. 23, starring Buster Keaton and with acclaimed graphic novel creator Matt Phelan, who will introduce the film and then also be available for a Q&A afterwards. 

The film itself screens at 6:30 p.m. at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street), but a pre-screening reception  with champagne for the adults and sparkling cider for the kids, begins at 5:30 p.m.

Representatives from Village Books will also be in attendance and available to sell copies of Phelan’s novels, including the graphic novel that inspired this evening, Bluffton: My Summer With Buster Keaton

 

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Kaili Blues

Masters of Asian Cinema: Kaili Blues

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is the 2015 feature Kaili Blues.  It will screen on Tuesday, February 14 at 6:30pm at Pickford Film Center, 1318 Bay Street in downtown Bellingham.  

Kaili Blues is the debut feature of the young filmmaker Bi Gan, set in his hometown of Kaili, Guizhou Prefecture. At the center of the film is a quest featuring a complex character, Chen, an ex-con trying to do the right thing.  Chen has two searches he has undertaken: one to find his nephew, who has been sold by Chen’s irresponsible brother, and the other to find the former lover of his elderly coworker and give him some items she has been saving.  

The journey operates on many levels, reaching back into the past and into the future, as well as plumbing psychic depths in the main character. Part of his quest involves finding some people from the Miao ethnic group, which Bi himself is part of. Bi received best director prizes at a couple of festivals for this work. Much commentary has focused on a 41-minute shot at the center of the film that unfolds in a dreamlike way.

Series curator and WWU librarian Jeff Purdue explains that this particular scene resonates with the viewers long after the time of watching this film.

“This is the sort of film that critics often describe as poetic, but here it’s more apt than usual – director Bi’s own poetry weaves through this film, making it an unlikely and less linear companion piece to the currently playing [at the Pickford], Paterson.”

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema series was one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series, featuring some of the best films in World Cinema with movies that span both decades and genres. The Masters of Asian Cinema series continues that rich tradition.

Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Kaili Blues will be introduced by Kristen Parris,  an Associate Professor at WWU in the Department of Political Science where she teaches Chinese Politics, East Asian Politics, and other courses in comparative politics.  

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Speaking of Maps: Maps as Lenses on Nazism

WWU Professor Ed Mathieu to speak on Feb. 23 about “Maps as Lenses on Nazism, 1772-1945”  

Western Washington University will host Dr. Ed Mathieu for a presentation titled “Maps as Lenses on Nazism, 1772 to 1945” from 4-5:00 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23 in the Map Collection area of Western Libraries. This event is free and open to the public.

Dr. Edward Mathieu is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of History at Western. He earned his PhD in modern German history from the University of Michigan and has taught courses at Western in German history, the Holocaust, gender and sexuality, Western Civilization, and World History.

The Nazi movement emerged from European and global contexts that can be explored geographically. Through the consideration of geography and geographical change, Mathieu will explain how the Nazis imagined the problems of the world and their revolution in spatial terms, and how a geographic sensibility is essential to understanding the practices and effects of Nazism.

Mathieu’s talk will examine maps related to such issues as the German diaspora in Europe, the demography of the Jews in Europe, the partition of Poland in the eighteenth century, the developing space of a united Germany in the nineteenth century, the geography of the First World War and its aftermath, Nazism’s expansionism before and during the Second World War, the geographies of mass murder, and, finally, the geography of the defeat of Nazism.

This event is co-sponsored by Western Libraries, WWU’s Department of History, and the Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity, and is part of the “Speaking of Maps” program, which are quarterly talks designed to highlight the use and value of maps in research, in teaching and learning, and in daily life.

For more information about the Map Collection or about this event, contact Dennis Matthews, WWU Map Collection Manager, at (360) 650-3272 or Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu.

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Faculty Focus Groups

Faculty Focus Groups – Request for Participants

Western Libraries is seeking input from faculty at Western on how subject librarians can support teaching, learning, and research in departments and programs. 
 
The Libraries is currently examining the role of subject librarians and would like to align the important services librarians provide more effectively with the changing curricular, research, and teaching & learning needs of the university. 
 
As part of this effort, the Libraries invites feedback and advice from Western faculty, and is hosting a series of focus groups led by an experienced facilitator throughout the month of February. Faculty from every department at Western are invited to participate.
 
If you are interested in being a part of these focus groups, please submit this form to indicate your availability. You will be contacted within one week from the time of submission with an invitation to participate at a specific time selected from among the times you indicated.
 
Questions? Need more information? Please contact Sarah McDaniel, Director, Teaching & Learning and the Learning Commons, (360)650-7208  sarah.mcdaniel2@wwu.edu
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