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Tonight! Masters of Japanese Cinema-Harakiri

Harakiri movie poster

 

Harakiri

Date: January 10, 2012, Pickford Film Center

Time: 6:30 
Go to
Pickford Film Center website for listed show time

This well-regarded Japanese drama follows an aging samurai as he attempts to regain his family's honor. In 17th century Japan, a shift in the country's political structure has thrown the feudal Shogun system into disuse. Impoverished samurai wander the countryside, asking wealthy estate owners if they can commit hara-kiri, a grisly form of suicide, on their property.

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

The Masters of Japanese Cinema series @ the Pickford Film Center, shines a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The series is co-sponsored by Western Washington University Libraries, and curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

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Coffee in the Commons Wed. @ 3

Coffee in the Commons this Wed. @ 3pm

The Library’s Learning Commons closes the term with Coffee in the Commons
during finals week – Dec. 7, Wed, at 3 p.m. in Wilson Library 265 (next to the Media Circulation Desk  – hosted by the Writing Instruction Support program. 
Come check out the print/video resources on teaching writing as well as sample writing assignments/activities and find out more about the Writing Proficiency requirement. 

And, of course, enjoy free coffee/tea!

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Masters of Japanese Cinema-Sansho the Bailiff - Dec. 6

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

Masters of Japanese Cinema is a new series for Pickford Film Center, shining a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. Curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

   Sancho the Bailiff Movie Poster

 

 

Sansho the Bailiff

Kenji Mizoguchi's masterpiece opens in 11th-century Japan with an aristocratic woman Tamaki traveling through the woods with her daughter Anju, son Zushio, and maid. Through flashbacks, we learn that her husband, Taira no Masauji, was a local governor who was exiled because of his honesty and integrity. Before he leaves, he gives his son an amulet of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, and tells him, "Without mercy, man is like a beast. Men are created equal, everyone is entitled to happiness."

 

 

 

Date: December 6, 2011

Time: 6:30  Visit  http://pickfordcinema.org/page/PlayingPFC.aspx

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Local Poet Paul Piper to read @ Village Books July 28


 Local Poet Paul Piper will read from his new work
Dogs and Other Poems

Thursday, July 28, 7:00 pm.
at Village Books, 1200 11th St. Fairhaven

 

 

 

"Dogs and Other Poems by Paul S. Piper is a collection of poems written over the past two years. The poems are whimsical, funny, philosophical and spiritual, and are influenced by the great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa, and the persona of poems of Robert Aitken (Zen Master Raven), as well as numerous others.  He is currently a librarian at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

Village Books is pleased to carry copies of Paul's latest book, Dogs & Other Poems, as well as copies of his poetry book Now & Then. Please call 360-671-2626 to obtain copies.

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Origins of the Culture War

Origins of the Culture War: Social Issues in State Party Platforms, 1960-2016

The recipient of the 2017 James W. Scott Research Fellowship, Matthew Carr, will give a talk entitled “Origins of the Culture War: Social Issues in State Party Platforms, 1960-2016,” at noon on Thursday, July 27 in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor). The presentation is free and open to the public.

During the late-20th century, social issues that previously had played little role in party division came to separate one party from the other. Republican and Democratic elites staked out opposing positions on a range of issues – including abortion, gay rights, the role of religion in the public sphere, and gun control – and party electorates today are sharply polarized over these issues. In his talk, Carr will explore Democratic and Republican political party platforms from 1960 to the present day, especially the emergence of abortion and gay rights as partisan issues.

Matthew Carr is a doctoral candidate in the political science PhD program at Columbia University. His areas of interest include American Political Institutions, Political Parties, and Policy Development. As part of the Fellowship program, Carr will participate in a week-long residency at Western, during which he will examine archival collections at CPNWS including the papers of former Washington-State Congressmen Al Swift, Jack Metcalf, and Frank Atwood; records of the American Civil Liberties Union – Whatcom County Chapter; and local and regional Democratic and Republican Party records.

The James W. Scott Regional Research Fellowship is offered annually to scholars who conduct significant research using archival holdings at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (a unit of Western Libraries Heritage Resources). Funds are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. Scott, a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region, and a founder and first director of CPNWS.

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Paper & Scissors Rock!

New Art Exhibit by Leslie Hall

A new art exhibit entitled “Paper and Scissors Rock!” by Leslie Hall is now on display in Western Libraries Gallery 1, located at the end of the Mann Family Skybridge. This exhibit will remain on display through September 15, 2017 and is available for viewing during the hours the library is open.  

Hall’s art has previously exhibited in other venues, including the Murray-Goltz Archives Building lobby and reading room, the annual WWU Employees Arts and Crafts Show, and Western’s Small Business Development Center conference room.

Hall has been interested in art since she was a child, and throughout her life she has worked with a variety of mediums, including batik, silkscreen, and fiber.

“What I like to do is play with color, shape and texture using various kinds of papers, pens, gouache, scissors and glue,” Hall explains in her artist’s statement. “I might start out with a small idea from something I have seen or read that in some way hooks me. Other times I doodle or mess around with paper scraps and see what happens. I try to show what positive energy might look like, be it of the natural or spiritual world, and to create a sense of the place it inhabits.”

In addition to being an artist, Hall is also a full-time staff member of Western Libraries. In 2006, she committed to spending as much of her free time as possible to creating art, mainly working with paper, and this current exhibit shows some of that work. At the end of July and after a 31–year career at Western Libraries, Hall will retire and will have even more time to devote to her art.

Hall first began working in the library in 1982 as a temporary cataloger, and then returned as a full-time employee in 1986.  She has since worked in the Music Library, and at Western Libraries in interlibrary loan and also in cataloging. Hall was also a founding member of the library’s Art Exhibits Committee, which formed in 2009 and began exhibiting in 2011. Currently, the library has four art galleries, which showcases the art of faculty, staff, students and community members. In addition to her many contributions during her time at Western Libraries, Hall is also leaving Western a legacy she helped create of ensuring that there will always be a place for art in the library.

 For more information about art exhibits at Western Libraries, please see: https://library.wwu.edu/exhibits_art. For questions or comments about Hall’s art, you can contact her via email at: ha5ll@hotmail.com. 

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Bellingham Pride 2017

Western Libraries & Bellingham Pride

Western Libraries’ staff, friends, and family came together in celebration of “Bellingham Pride” on Sunday, July 9, 2017. Since 2013, participating in  Pride has grown into an annual tradition that many library employees look forward to and enjoy. For the past couple of years, Western Libraries has also walked in the parade and shared a festival table with members of the Bellingham Public Library and the Whatcom County Library System.

"I really do look forward to this every year," said staff member Amy Sedovic. "It is such a family-friendly event and a wonderful way to connect with the wider Bellingham community as a whole.  And the cheers of, 'we love our libraries!' from friends and neighbors along the parade route is very hopeful and heartwarming." Sedovic explained how libraries are seen as “open, welcoming, and affirming places,” and that she feels honored to be a part of that tradition.

As explained by the American Library Association, libraries can serve LGBTQ people by ensuring that they are represented in library collections. Additionally, as a population frequently subjected to discrimination and harassment, LGBTQ people can benefit from access to information and the sense of community libraries provide.  

"I was really excited that the libraries were going to table at Pride," said Emma Winningham, who began working at Western Libraries a little under a year ago. "I knew I had to sign up to be there! It was a great opportunity to connect with our broader community and show that we can work together to support each other.”

Librarian Rebecca Marrall explained that she looks forward to the festival every year because of the chance to connect with the community and raise awareness about the Libraries’ historical and archival collections that feature regional LGBTQ narratives. A poster  featuring some of these collections was on display and served as a popular conversation piece at the festival.

“The Heritage Resources poster was a big hit,” said librarian Sylvia Tag. “Lots of folks commented on the amazing history within our region and community around LGBTQ organizations, artists, and activists as displayed on the poster.”

Western Libraries anticipates increased WWU participation  in the Bellingham Pride events as enthusiasm for such an important and significant celebration grows, and they invite anyone interested to join them next year!  

For more information about the LGBTQ Archival and primary source materials at Western Libraries, contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu.

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Intersession & Summer Hours

Library Hours for Intersession and Summer Quarter

Western Libraries will be open during the intersession (June 12th - June 19th) Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., closed weekends.

During the summer session, (June 20th – August 18th), Western Libraries will be open Monday - Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed weekends.

The Map Collection area of the Libraries will be closed June 12-16, and will be open Monday - Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 19-August 18.

Heritage Resources will be open throughout the summer session with a few posted exceptions. Hours of operation for each of the three units (Special Collections, the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and University Archives & Records Management) can be found here.

The Hacherl Research & Writing Studio is open online during Summer Session from June 20th through August 18th. You can submit a draft online or chat with Studio staff by going to https://library.wwu.edu/rws/connect. If you would like to schedule an in-person meeting with Studio staff, please email rws@wwu.edu.

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