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Tonight! Masters of Japanese Cinema-Harakiri

Harakiri movie poster

 

Harakiri

Date: January 10, 2012, Pickford Film Center

Time: 6:30 
Go to
Pickford Film Center website for listed show time

This well-regarded Japanese drama follows an aging samurai as he attempts to regain his family's honor. In 17th century Japan, a shift in the country's political structure has thrown the feudal Shogun system into disuse. Impoverished samurai wander the countryside, asking wealthy estate owners if they can commit hara-kiri, a grisly form of suicide, on their property.

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

The Masters of Japanese Cinema series @ the Pickford Film Center, shines a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The series is co-sponsored by Western Washington University Libraries, and curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

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Coffee in the Commons Wed. @ 3

Coffee in the Commons this Wed. @ 3pm

The Library’s Learning Commons closes the term with Coffee in the Commons
during finals week – Dec. 7, Wed, at 3 p.m. in Wilson Library 265 (next to the Media Circulation Desk  – hosted by the Writing Instruction Support program. 
Come check out the print/video resources on teaching writing as well as sample writing assignments/activities and find out more about the Writing Proficiency requirement. 

And, of course, enjoy free coffee/tea!

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Masters of Japanese Cinema-Sansho the Bailiff - Dec. 6

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

Masters of Japanese Cinema is a new series for Pickford Film Center, shining a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. Curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

   Sancho the Bailiff Movie Poster

 

 

Sansho the Bailiff

Kenji Mizoguchi's masterpiece opens in 11th-century Japan with an aristocratic woman Tamaki traveling through the woods with her daughter Anju, son Zushio, and maid. Through flashbacks, we learn that her husband, Taira no Masauji, was a local governor who was exiled because of his honesty and integrity. Before he leaves, he gives his son an amulet of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, and tells him, "Without mercy, man is like a beast. Men are created equal, everyone is entitled to happiness."

 

 

 

Date: December 6, 2011

Time: 6:30  Visit  http://pickfordcinema.org/page/PlayingPFC.aspx

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Local Poet Paul Piper to read @ Village Books July 28


 Local Poet Paul Piper will read from his new work
Dogs and Other Poems

Thursday, July 28, 7:00 pm.
at Village Books, 1200 11th St. Fairhaven

 

 

 

"Dogs and Other Poems by Paul S. Piper is a collection of poems written over the past two years. The poems are whimsical, funny, philosophical and spiritual, and are influenced by the great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa, and the persona of poems of Robert Aitken (Zen Master Raven), as well as numerous others.  He is currently a librarian at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

Village Books is pleased to carry copies of Paul's latest book, Dogs & Other Poems, as well as copies of his poetry book Now & Then. Please call 360-671-2626 to obtain copies.

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Citations Why & How

Citations Why & How: A Research & Writing Studio Mini-Workshop

Two people at a table with a computer and some papers looking at a citation reference book.Having trouble with difficult online citations? Wondering how to cite a source within a source? Drop in to the Citation Mini-Workshops to learn the why and how of creating citations. Never be discouraged by a complex citation again! 

Stop by the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, (Haggard Hall 2nd Floor East) on any of the following dates/times:

  • Friday, March 2nd, 11:20am-11:50am 
  • Monday, March 5th, 3:20pm-3:50pm
  • Tuesday March 6th, 1:20pm-1:50pm

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While it is true that any time is citation time in the Studio, you can also get some extra help with all of your citation needs during these sessions. Join us to learn some tips and tricks, or just drop in for one-on-one assistance. We can help you with APA, Chicago/Turabian, MLA, or any other citation style. Questions about this workshop? Contact us at rws@wwu.edu.

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Volunteers Needed

Help Us Improve the Library Catalog

Two people near a computer smiling at each other, one seated with her hands on the keyboard and the other standing nearby holding a clipboard and pen.Western Libraries Usability & Design Working Group is currently evaluating how our patrons search for materials in the catalog and we would love your input!

We are seeking participants for a brief exercise, and undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, and staff are invited to participate. This activity shouldn’t take longer than 15 – 20 minutes.  

When & Where: Sessions will take place within the library between the dates of February 22 and March 7. Please see here for more information about available days and times. Once you’ve selected a time for your session, a library professional will contact you with information about next steps.

Questions about the opportunity? Please e-mail or call Associate Professor Rebecca Marrall, Chair of the Usability & Design Working Group (360-650-4493).

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UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories

UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories

Western Libraries will host a student panel discussion, “The Journeys and Untold Stories of Western Washington University's Undocumented Students," on Thursday, March 1 at 4 p.m. in the Library Presentation Room (Wilson Library Room 164F).  

Please join us for the chance to hear first-hand some of the untold stories from members of the Blue Group, Western's undocumented student club, and to learn about how we at Western can better support undocumented students.

“My  life isn’t a movie, it’s a reality.” Those words come directly from Maria Dimas’ narrative, "America Was Never White," one of the many stories shared in the book, UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories, written by students at Western and published by Western CEDAR.  During this event, panelists will share some of their own experiences and talk about their inspiration for this book.

Undocumented students face a number of pressures and stresses that are unique to their student experience because of their status. UndocuStudents: Our Untold Stories, is a collection of essays, poetry, photographs, and artwork created by members of the Blue Group.  

As the Blue Group has grown from just a few students meeting informally into an official Western Washington University Associated Students club, into an organization that is now widely recognized in their local community, members of the Blue Group increasingly receive requests to give presentations to help people understand their experiences as undocumented immigrants and students. Their book is one way these remarkable students are sharing their perspectives and insights with their community.

As stated in the introduction to the book:

“You may read or see a piece in this book that resonates strongly with you, that helps you realize you are not alone. Or you may read or see a piece that causes you to think about something from a new perspective, from a place that challenges you. Or you may read or see something that makes you want to learn even more, something that inspires you to seek out others in your own community whom you can connect with and find ways to support. All of these things are good, and we hope that in sharing these pieces of ourselves, others will feel supported and find ways of giving support.”

This event is sponsored by Western Libraries in collaboration with the Blue Group, whose mission is to provide undocumented students the opportunity to meet other undocumented students, find resources and services, and to build community.

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Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Taipei Story'

"Taipei Story," February 13 @the Pickford Film Center

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is Taipei Story, which screens at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street).

Edward Yang's second feature, Taipei Story, was written by and stars the great Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-hsien. Hou plays a former baseball player whose loyalty to tradition and to friends and family threatens to derail his plans for the future with partner Chin (played by pop singer Tsai Chin).

Employing an understated visual style, Yang crafts a mournful meditation on a changing world and how connections from our past help and hinder us as we try to keep pace.

Each film in the Masters of Asian Cinema series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Series curator and librarian from Western Washington University, Jeff Purdue, will introduce Taipei Story.

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Asian Cinema series continues the rich tradition that began with the Masters of Japanese Cinema series, one of the Pickford's longest running and most popular series.

This year’s remaining film series lineup includes Maborosi, the first feature by Kore-eda Hirokazu, which will screen in March in a newly restored print.  Later in the spring will bring Taiwanese filmmaker Chen Kuo-fu’s 2001 The Personals.  And there will also be one more feature by Taiwanese director Edward Yang: his last feature, Yi Yi.

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