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Coffee in the Commons Wed. @ 3

Coffee in the Commons this Wed. @ 3pm

The Library’s Learning Commons closes the term with Coffee in the Commons
during finals week – Dec. 7, Wed, at 3 p.m. in Wilson Library 265 (next to the Media Circulation Desk  – hosted by the Writing Instruction Support program. 
Come check out the print/video resources on teaching writing as well as sample writing assignments/activities and find out more about the Writing Proficiency requirement. 

And, of course, enjoy free coffee/tea!

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Masters of Japanese Cinema-Sansho the Bailiff - Dec. 6

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

Masters of Japanese Cinema is a new series for Pickford Film Center, shining a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. Curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

   Sancho the Bailiff Movie Poster

 

 

Sansho the Bailiff

Kenji Mizoguchi's masterpiece opens in 11th-century Japan with an aristocratic woman Tamaki traveling through the woods with her daughter Anju, son Zushio, and maid. Through flashbacks, we learn that her husband, Taira no Masauji, was a local governor who was exiled because of his honesty and integrity. Before he leaves, he gives his son an amulet of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, and tells him, "Without mercy, man is like a beast. Men are created equal, everyone is entitled to happiness."

 

 

 

Date: December 6, 2011

Time: 6:30  Visit  http://pickfordcinema.org/page/PlayingPFC.aspx

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Local Poet Paul Piper to read @ Village Books July 28


 Local Poet Paul Piper will read from his new work
Dogs and Other Poems

Thursday, July 28, 7:00 pm.
at Village Books, 1200 11th St. Fairhaven

 

 

 

"Dogs and Other Poems by Paul S. Piper is a collection of poems written over the past two years. The poems are whimsical, funny, philosophical and spiritual, and are influenced by the great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa, and the persona of poems of Robert Aitken (Zen Master Raven), as well as numerous others.  He is currently a librarian at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

Village Books is pleased to carry copies of Paul's latest book, Dogs & Other Poems, as well as copies of his poetry book Now & Then. Please call 360-671-2626 to obtain copies.

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Spring Intersession Hours

Western Libraries will be open Monday through Friday during the intersession, March 18th through March 27th, from 8:30am to 4:30pm, closed weekends. The Map Collection will be closed from March 18th through March 26th, re-opening on March 27th. The Wilson North entrance to the library will also be closed during this period, but the library will remain accessible via the Haggard Hall entrance.

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Masters of Asian Cinema: 'Creepy'

'Creepy' @the Pickford Film Center, March 14

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is the 2016 feature Creepy.  It will screen on Tuesday, March 14 at 6:30pm at Pickford Film Center, 1318 Bay Street in downtown Bellingham.  

Before his 2008 film Tokyo Sonata introduced new audiences to his work, Kurosawa Kiyoshi was known as a horror director. His films were not ordinary horror films as they focused more on the complex psychological states of his characters than on delivering visceral thrills. Kurosawa’s current film is something of a return to his roots.

Creepy is the story of a police detective who is an expert in the psychology of serial killers. After a traumatic incident, he leaves the force, becomes a university professor of criminal psychology, and moves to a new neighborhood with his wife where he begins to make connections with a cold case and a new neighbor, both with deeply unsettling implications.

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Japanese Cinema series was one of the Pickford's longest running and most loved series, featuring some of the best films in World Cinema with movies that span both decades and genres. The Masters of Asian Cinema series continues that rich tradition.

Each film in the series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Creepy will be introduced by Colleen Laird in Western Washington University’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages.  Laird’s Ph.D. is in Japanese film studies, with a research focus on Japanese women directors.  

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Jonathan Evison: The Art & Craft of Writing

Whatcom READS! hosts Jonathan Evison at WWU

The 2017 Whatcom READS! selection is The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, a big-hearted and inspired novel by author Jonathan Evison. As part of the programming for WhatcomREADS!, Evison will be at Western Washington University on Saturday, March 11 from 2-3pm for “The Art and Craft of Writing” event. This event takes place in Western Libraries Reading Room (Wilson Library 4th Floor Central), and is free and open to the public.

Jonathan Evison is an American writer known for his novels All About Lulu (winner of the Washington State Book Award), West of Here (New York Times bestseller, winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award and the Booklist Editor’s Choice Award) and The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving (currently in development for film).

In 2009 and 2011, Evison was nominated by the American Book Association as “Most Engaging Author.” In his teens, Evison was a founding member and frontman of the Seattle punk band March of Crimes, which included future members of Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. Born in San Jose, California, he now lives on an island in western Washington with his family. His latest novel, This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!, was published in September 2015.

Whatcom READS! is a county-wide program that encourages everyone to read and discuss the same book. Each year, a new book is selected by Whatcom READS organizers. Community members are encouraged to read or listen to the book, share it with family, friends and neighbors, and participate in programs and special events that follow the themes in the book selection. Each series culminates with a visit by the author of the selected book, who makes numerous free-of-charge presentations at locations throughout the county.

Whatcom READS! is organized by all the public and academic libraries in Whatcom County and  community partner, Village Books, with significant funding from Friends of the Bellingham Public Library and Whatcom County Library Foundation, and support from other local businesses and organizations.

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Canines on Campus Return!

"Canines on Campus" Program Visits Western Libraries

Western Libraries will once again be joined by members of the “Canines on Campus” registered therapy animal program from Monday March 6th through Thursday March 16th. 

Teams of humans and animals (which now includes TWO cats, Smokey and Raul!) will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library off and on between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. during both the week preceding and the week of final exams. 

During this two-week period, this space will be reserved exclusively for the registered Canines on Campus therapy animal program, and animals who are not official Canines on Campus volunteers are not permitted in this area. 

Additionally, Western Libraries would like to remind everyone that while ADA service animals are welcome in the library, pets may not be brought into library facilities at any time.

The therapy animals who are part of the Canines on Campus program are registered through several different agencies and have met certain standards of skills and aptitude required for their acceptance into the program. Whatcom Therapy Dogs and Dogs on Call are the two organizations which provide volunteers to the Canines on Campus program.

For more information about the upcoming Canines on Campus visit, a schedule which includes the names of the volunteers, photos of the animals, and the times when they will be available for visiting, will be posted on an easel in the designated gallery area.

Remember to stop by the library to say hi or de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!  

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Connecting Literature to Life

Connecting Literature to Life: Childhood Inspiration Comes Full Circle

Keri Krout can still recall the long hot California summers of her childhood, and how they were marked by each arrival from the mail-order Scholastic book club. Krout and her siblings would gather around their mother, eagerly watching as she opened up the cardboard wrapping that encased the book.  But the one book Krout remembers most of all is Andrew Henry’s Meadow, written and illustrated by Doris (Wernstedt) Burn.

“We not only read her story, but I remember studying the pictures for hours and imagining my life in a meadow full of friends,” explained Krout. “My home of choice was the bird house built up in the sky. I imagined what a cool breeze would feel like, and the sound of the birds singing just to me.”

 Andrew Henry's Meadow is the story of a boy who feels ignored and unappreciated by his family and decides to build a special retreat for himself in a nearby meadow. Other children from the neighborhood join him, so he builds houses for them as well, each one customized to complement their interests and hobbies.

“My brother and I attempted to build a pulley system in his bedroom like Andrew Henry built for his younger brothers, but I admit our attempts fell short,” said Krout. She noted that while other books continued to arrive in the mail, it was Andrew Henry’s Meadow that impacted her the most.

“I grew up working with children,” said Krout, who now works as the manager of the Associated Students Child Development Center (CDC) at Western Washington University. “I think perhaps I understand children’s need to have their own space thanks to Andrew Henry.”

Krout recalled how her favorite childhood story resurfaced when she first began working at Western as she walked through The Outback on her way to work. She encountered a small cabin and was astonished to learn its connection to Doris Burn, as the cabin had once belonged to June and Farrar Burn, Doris Burn’s parents-in-law.

“My beginning started with a simple story of the need to create, to escape, to be understood and accepted.  And here I was, standing by the cabin which had belonged to the family of the woman whose life and creating influenced mine in ways I’m sure I can’t count.  I felt a sense of utter gratitude of how life can take a person full circle,” Krout explained.

Krout relayed this experience to some of the families of the CDC, and one of the parents later emailed her about a special exhibition featuring the work of Doris Burn that was on display at Western Libraries. As part of this exhibition, Doris Burn’s daughter, the local author and multi-dimensional artist Skye Burn, was scheduled to give a special public presentation about the life and legacy of her mother. Krout knew immediately she would attend this event, and following Skye’s talk, the two women finally met in person.

“What an honor to meet her daughter and to bask in the glow of creative genius,” said Krout. “How can I begin to even thank Doris and her family?”

Burn’s work continues to speak to readers of all ages, and since her death in 2011, Andrew Henry’s Meadow has been reissued by Penguin’s Philomel Books. The title has also been published and is presently available in translation in Korea, China and Japan.  Andrew Henry's Meadow won the Washington Governor's Art Award and was a Weekly Reader book club selection.

 “Plenty of Things to Do: The Work of Northwest Children’s Author Doris Burn,” will remain on display through March 10th, and is available for viewing weekdays Monday – Friday in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor) between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.  Additionallydigital version of the Doris Burn exhibit is now available online, as are detailed collection guides to the Doris Burn Artwork and Manuscripts and related collections of June and Farrar Burn Papers and South Burn Papers, housed and available at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC. These materials help document the cultural and artistic history of the Pacific Northwest region and were created by an artist and writer who sought specifically to engage with the needs, interests, and creativity of a younger audience.

Skye Burn’s talk, “The Strength of a Dream: A Daughter's Portrait of a Northwest Children's Author and Illustrator,” can be found in Western CEDAR and is viewable from this link.

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