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Tonight! Masters of Japanese Cinema-Harakiri

Harakiri movie poster

 

Harakiri

Date: January 10, 2012, Pickford Film Center

Time: 6:30 
Go to
Pickford Film Center website for listed show time

This well-regarded Japanese drama follows an aging samurai as he attempts to regain his family's honor. In 17th century Japan, a shift in the country's political structure has thrown the feudal Shogun system into disuse. Impoverished samurai wander the countryside, asking wealthy estate owners if they can commit hara-kiri, a grisly form of suicide, on their property.

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

The Masters of Japanese Cinema series @ the Pickford Film Center, shines a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The series is co-sponsored by Western Washington University Libraries, and curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

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Coffee in the Commons Wed. @ 3

Coffee in the Commons this Wed. @ 3pm

The Library’s Learning Commons closes the term with Coffee in the Commons
during finals week – Dec. 7, Wed, at 3 p.m. in Wilson Library 265 (next to the Media Circulation Desk  – hosted by the Writing Instruction Support program. 
Come check out the print/video resources on teaching writing as well as sample writing assignments/activities and find out more about the Writing Proficiency requirement. 

And, of course, enjoy free coffee/tea!

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Masters of Japanese Cinema-Sansho the Bailiff - Dec. 6

Masters of Japanese Cinema Banner

Masters of Japanese Cinema is a new series for Pickford Film Center, shining a light on the rich history of Japanese cinema, from old masters such as Ozu, Akira Kurosawa and Naruse, to modern masters such as Miyazaki, Kore-eda, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa. Curated by Jeff Purdue, a librarian and professor at Western Washington University.

   Sancho the Bailiff Movie Poster

 

 

Sansho the Bailiff

Kenji Mizoguchi's masterpiece opens in 11th-century Japan with an aristocratic woman Tamaki traveling through the woods with her daughter Anju, son Zushio, and maid. Through flashbacks, we learn that her husband, Taira no Masauji, was a local governor who was exiled because of his honesty and integrity. Before he leaves, he gives his son an amulet of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, and tells him, "Without mercy, man is like a beast. Men are created equal, everyone is entitled to happiness."

 

 

 

Date: December 6, 2011

Time: 6:30  Visit  http://pickfordcinema.org/page/PlayingPFC.aspx

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Local Poet Paul Piper to read @ Village Books July 28


 Local Poet Paul Piper will read from his new work
Dogs and Other Poems

Thursday, July 28, 7:00 pm.
at Village Books, 1200 11th St. Fairhaven

 

 

 

"Dogs and Other Poems by Paul S. Piper is a collection of poems written over the past two years. The poems are whimsical, funny, philosophical and spiritual, and are influenced by the great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa, and the persona of poems of Robert Aitken (Zen Master Raven), as well as numerous others.  He is currently a librarian at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

Village Books is pleased to carry copies of Paul's latest book, Dogs & Other Poems, as well as copies of his poetry book Now & Then. Please call 360-671-2626 to obtain copies.

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Speaking of Maps: Building A Digital Atlas of the PNW

"Speaking of Maps" - Dr. Aquila Flower, May 3

Dr. Aquila Flower will present “Building a Digital Atlas of the Pacific Northwest” from 4:00-5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 3 in the Map Collection area of Western Libraries.  During her presentation, Flower will show a preview of the Atlas of the Pacific Northwest, and explore some of the fundamental geographical concepts used to make decisions regarding data processing approaches.

This event is free and open to the public.

Understanding processes and patterns that cross international borders is challenging due to a lack of data that covers both sides of the border. With support from the Border Policy Research Institute and the Huxley Spatial Institute, Dr. Flower is helping create the digital Atlas of the Pacific Northwest, an online geospatial data clearinghouse designed to hold seamless cross-border datasets.

“Many geospatial datasets are available only for one specific county. This can create the impression that the world vanishes on the other side of an international border, and is a serious impediment to research and policy decisions,” explained Flower. “Even if you can collect datasets for different countries, you'll often find that they have incompatible geographies, and that the variables they contain were recorded in different units and for different dates.”

Her first addition to the Atlas uses census records from Washington and British Columbia, which allow for seamless analysis of demographic change across the US-Canada border to create a harmonized database of human demography characteristics.  

“Knowing where people live, and how population is likely to change in the near future is critical for making policy decisions. However, census records from the US and Canada are difficult to compare because they are collected in different years, define some variables differently, and the official geospatial datasets do not line up perfectly at the border,” said Flower.

The single dataset will make it easier to compare census records from the US and Canada, and will have consistent spatial characteristics, temporal coverage, and variable definitions that can be useful to policy makers, researchers, and the general public in understanding past, current, and future population distributions in Washington and British Columbia.

Dr. Aquila Flower is an assistant professor of geography at Western where she teaches physical geography and Geographic Information Science courses. Her research focuses primarily on the complex, interactive effects of climate variability, human land use patterns, and natural disturbances on forest ecosystems.

This event is co-sponsored by Western Libraries, Border Policy Research Institute, Huxley Spatial Institute, and Huxley College of the Environment, and is part of the “Speaking of Maps” program, which are quarterly talks are designed to highlight the use and value of maps in research, in teaching and learning, and in daily life.

For more information about the Map Collection or about this event, contact Dennis Matthews, WWU Map Collection manager, at (360) 650-3272 or Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu.

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Out & Out from the Family to the Community

Kristin Mahoney to Discuss Author, Artist, & Activist Laurence Housman 

Western Washington University Associate Professor of English Kristin Mahoney will present “Out and Out from the Family to the Community: the Housmans and the Politics of Queer Sibling Devotion" on Tuesday, May 9 at 4:00 p.m. in Western Libraries Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th floor).

The event is free and open to the public.
 
In “The Unexpected Years” (1937), Laurence Housman recalls his brother Alfred asking, “Was there ever such an interesting family as we were?” While Alfred, author of the tremendously popular “A Shropshire Lad” (1896), was perhaps the most well-known of the Housman siblings, his brother Laurence and sister Clemence also made names for themselves by being outspoken in their advocacy of sexually dissident and feminist causes. Laurence’s illustrations, which appeared in the Decadent periodical the “Yellow Book,” revel in androgyny, and his fairy tales frequently celebrate queer forms of desire and articulate a queer politics. Clemence’s well-received story “The Were-Wolf” (1890) focuses on a dangerous and seductive female werewolf, and she collaborated with Laurence in the production of banners for the suffrage movement.

In this talk, Mahoney will explore the manner in which Laurence and Clemence’s collaborative relationship became the foundation for broader forms of feminist and anticolonial political thinking. She will also address the ways in which Laurence’s advocacy for sex reform informed his posthumous framing of his brother’s sexuality. For the Housman family, queer kinship practices engendered political activism, and political activism fostered queer kinship practices.

Kristin Mahoney is an Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University, where her research and teaching interests include aestheticism, Decadence, and queer studies. She has published articles in Victorian Studies, Criticism, Victorian Review, Victorian Periodicals Review, English Literature in Transition, Nineteenth-Century Prose, and Literature Compass. Her book “Literature and the Politics of Post-Victorian Decadence” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2015. She is currently working on a project entitled “Queer Kinship after Wilde: Transnational Aestheticism and the Family.”

This talk is offered as part of the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers program, which are quarterly events ​featuring presenters who are authorities in their respective fields, and who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research.

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WIS Event: Roots of Rhetoric

Roots of Rhetoric and Writing in the Liberal Arts 

Writing Instruction Support (WIS) is sponsoring an off-campus reading and discussion event for faculty and instructors on Friday May 5, from 4:15-5:15pm. (Please note: this event replaces the one originally scheduled for Friday, April 21st).
 
"Roots of Rhetoric and Writing in the Liberal Arts" will take place at Aslan Brewery here in Bellingham (1313 N. Forest St.). This is a child-friendly location so if you have kids, bring them along!  Join us for an informal discussion of some of the oldest writing on rhetoric and education, Gorgias's "The Encomium of Helen" and "On What is Not or On Nature," and together we’ll consider questions like:
 
o   What purpose should the study of rhetoric and writing serve in a liberal arts curriculum?
o   Is writing a practical skill? A philosophical discipline for the pursuit of wisdom? 
 

RSVPs are appreciated but not required. Please send comments and questions to Julie Dugger, Director of Writing Instruction Support.  Unable to come, but interested in the topic? Click on this link for more info.

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Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community

The Spring 2017 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue you will learn about a variety of Heritage Resources' collections which document local and regional artistic culture, including the digitized correspondence of Skagit County artists, photographs and oral histories related to campus sculpture, and a recent donation of valuable photography books.

Heritage Resources consists of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: Isamu Noguchi at the dedication ceremony for Skyviewing Sculpture, 1969, Campus History Collection, Special Collections.

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