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Jack Berryman to Speak About Fly Fishing Pioneers

Jack Berryman to Speak About Northwest Fly Fishing Pioneers: Ralph Wahl, Ralph Olson, and Alfred Knudson

 
Noted fly fishing writer and photographer Jack Berryman will give a talk entitled “Three Steelhead Fly Fishing Pioneers in the Northwest: Wahl, Olson and Knudson, 1900-1990” on Tuesday, July 11th at 2:00 p.m. in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor).
 
The event is free and open to the public.
 
In his talk, Berryman will present a biographical summary of the career and contributions of three renowned Northwest steelhead fly fishing pioneers, Ralph Wahl and Ralph Olson (who are featured in Berryman’s book, Fly-Fishing Pioneers & Legends of the Northwest) and Alfred Knusdon (who was the subject of one of Berryman’s past columns in Northwest Fly Fishing). Berryman will detail the contributions of each individual to the sport and culture of fly fishing, illustrating his talk with slides. 
 
Jack Berryman grew up in central Pennsylvania fishing trout and bass, and hunting both small and large game. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland and was hired by the University of Washington’s School of Medicine in 1975. After moving to the Pacific Northwest, he became even more enamored with fishing, spending many summers guiding on Alaska’s Kenai River. In 1986, he began a freelance writing and photography career, ultimately publishing over 300 articles and numerous photographs in a wide variety of adventure, travel and outdoor magazines. 
 
Berryman is a member of the Society of Environmental Journalists and a past columnist for Salmon Trout Steelheader and Northwest Fly Fishing. His most recent book, Fly-Fishing Pioneers & Legends of the Northwest (2006) won the 2007 Outdoor Writers Association of America’s Excellence in Craft Award for best book. 
 
For more information about the event, please contact Tamara Belts, Special Collections Manager, at (360) 650-3193 or Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu. 
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"Pom Poko" - Tues. Jun 6th

Masters of Asian Cinema: Pom Poko

The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is Takahata Isao’s 1994 animated feature, Pom Poko.  It will screen on Tuesday, June 6 at 6:30pm at Pickford Film Center, 1318 Bay Street in downtown Bellingham.  

Pom Poko is directed by one of the two founders of Studio Ghibli, Takahata Isao, who also directed Only Yesterday, Grave of the Fireflies, and The Tale of Princess Kaguya, among other films. 

Pom Poko concerns a group of creatures known as tanuki, often translated as “raccoon dogs.” These are animals native to Japan who have appeared in folklore and children’s songs for hundreds of years, in which they are reputed to have shape-shifting powers similar to fox spirits.

In this film, a group of tanuki near Tokyo decide to combat the encroaching suburbanization of their habitat in some very direct and fanciful ways.

“Pom Poko combines the environmental theme with an extension of the folklore so that the tanuki use the full extent of their mythological powers, and then some, to fight off development,” explained series curator and librarian at Western Washington University, Jeff Purdue.It’s a funny and bittersweet film.”

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Asian Cinema series continues the rich tradition that began with the Masters of Japanese Cinema series, one of the Pickford's longest running and most popular series. Each film in the Masters of Asian Cinema series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. WWU Professor in the Department of English, Dawn Dietrich, will introduce this film. 

Pom Poko marks the last film in this year’s Masters of Asian Cinema series, which will return in the fall of 2017. To learn more about upcoming films featured in this series, contact Jeff.Purdue@wwu.edu. 

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Canines & Cats on Campus Return!

"Canines & Cats on Campus" Program Visits Western Libraries

Western Libraries will once again be joined by members of the “Canines & Cats on Campus” registered therapy animal program from Tuesday, May 30th through Wednesday, June 7th. 

Teams of humans and animals will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library off and on between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. during both the week preceding and the week of final exams. 

During this two-week period, this space will be reserved exclusively for the registered Canines & Cats on Campus therapy animal program, and animals who are not official volunteers with this program are not permitted in this area. 

Additionally, Western Libraries would like to remind everyone that while ADA service animals are welcome in the library, pets may not be brought into library facilities at any time.

The therapy animals who are part of the Canines & Cats on Campus program are registered through several different agencies and have met certain standards of skills and aptitude required for their acceptance into the program. Whatcom Therapy Dogs and Dogs on Call are the two organizations which provide volunteers to the Canines & Cats on Campus program.

For more information about the upcoming Canines & Cats on Campus visit, a schedule which includes the names of the volunteers, photos of the animals, and the times when they will be available for visiting, will be posted on an easel in the designated gallery area beginning Tuesday, May 30th.

Remember to stop by the library to say hi or de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!  

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Supporting Student Professional Development

Supporting Student Employee Professional Development 

At Western Washington University, student employees play an integral role in helping the Libraries fulfill its teaching and learning mission. Whether through providing research and writing assistance in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, dialogue facilitation in the Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA), or by sharing their energy, expertise, and insights in the day-to-day activities that help the Libraries function effectively, the contributions and dedication of library student employees are essential to the successful advancement of Western Libraries' mission. 

In addition to their daily work, some students also engage in professional development and  research activities, which may include presentations at national and international conferences. For example, as part of their first year as assistants in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, student employees develop a research topic related to Studio scholarship and practice, which they later share in the form of “legacy projects.” They may also choose to submit their work as proposals for conference presentations.

Last fall, sixteen Studio student assistants attended the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW). Of those sixteen, fifteen students gave presentations where they spoke about their research and the results of their legacy projects with conference attendees.

“Studio assistants tell us that the seminar and the opportunity to design and present a research project to a broader community of practice  has a huge impact on their academic and professional skills and lives,” explained Pippa Hemsley, Assistant Director of the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio. While an undergraduate student at Western, Hemsley was herself  a student assistant in the former Writing Center.

Last fall, two additional library student employees presented at a different conference, the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL), held in Los Angeles, California. Autumn Simmons and Nathan Romond, (who both work for the TLA), gave a joint presentation about the use of dialogue and the practice of intentionally flattening hierarchies to eliminate barriers in teaching and learning.

“Autumn and I were able to present our work to an audience of international scholars, many of whom were faculty,” explained Romond. He noted that their presentation embodied what they were speaking about, “underscoring the idea that students can engage more personally and deeply with work when operating in an environment that incorporates a flattened hierarchy among students and faculty.”

Both Simmons and Romond described their time at ISSoTL as one of the most memorable and significant experiences of their undergraduate education.

“As an undergraduate, the ability to meet with so many academic professionals and share work being done felt like a privilege,” stated Simmons. “This sharing of knowledge, and the connections made along the way is what makes this conference so special and necessary in order to maximize the benefits of higher education.”

Western Libraries relies on the generosity of its donors to make these life-changing opportunities possible. Philanthropic gifts help support library student employees by funding registration fees, travel expenses, and other associated costs of participating in conferences and other research opportunities that advance the libraries' teaching and learning mission"

 If you would like to help, please consider contributing to the Western Libraries Student Employee Opportunity Fund. And a special thank you goes out to everyone who has already contributed to this fund , whether on WWU Give Day or now!

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How do YOU search?

Call for Participants - May 23rd-25th

Western Libraries is currently evaluating how library users search for materials in the online catalog, and we would love your input! We are seeking participants for a brief exercise that should only take between 5 and 10 minutes to complete.

On May 23, 24, and 25, Western Libraries will host a table in Haggard Hall, 2nd floor, (near the Circulation Services Desk) from 1:00pm to 3:00pm. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty & staff from outside of the Libraries are all invited to participate.

We hope you can stop by and we appreciate you taking the time to help us improve our systems and services. Want to participate but can’t make it during the scheduled times? Please contact us via our website, or call Rebecca Marrall, Discovery Services Librarian (360-650-4493).

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Undergraduate Research Award Winners

Announcing the 2016-2017 Western Libraries Undergraduate Award Winners!

Winners of this year’s Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award were honored at a small reception in the library on June 9th, during which Dean of Libraries Mark Greenberg recognized the award-winning students for their accomplishments, and presented each awardee with a certificate. Friends, family members of the award-winning students, the students’ faculty mentors, and members of the 2016-2017 Undergraduate Research Award review committee were also in attendance. This year's winners are:

  • Christina Becker,  "Framing the Frat Boy: an analysis of frames used in coverage of campus rape by The New York Times," (Faculty Mentor: Brian J. Bowe, Journalism).
  • Nicole Carroll, "A New Look at the Constitutional Convention and State Ratifying Conventions: How Reason and Interest Played a Role," (Faculty Mentor: Johann Neem, History).
  • Jeffrey Guptil, "The Grammaticalization of because in Standard English," (Faculty Mentor: Janet Xing, Linguistics).

 

Three Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Awards are given annually to Western Washington University undergraduate students in recognition of their excellence and originality in creating research papers for courses taught across the colleges based on significant inquiry using library resources and collections. Each winner of the Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award receives a certificate, a cash award of $500.00, and publication of their prize-winning paper in Western CEDAR, Western Washington University’s institutional repository. 

Every spring, a review committee consisting of a variety of faculty members from the Libraries and other departments at Western selects from among the submissions three papers which demonstrate excellence in the creation of research papers for courses taught across the colleges. Papers must be based on significant inquiry using library resources and collections, and they must demonstrate originality or the potential to lead to subsequent original research. 

Congratulations to this year's winners on their excellent work and their award-winning research! And thank you also to the Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award committee chair Elizabeth Stephan (Libraries) and committee members Gabe Gossett (Libraries), Tim Kowalczyk (Chemistry), Glenn Tsunokai (Sociology), and Colleen Laird (Modern Languages).

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Invitations for Workshops

Invitation to Apply: Backward by Design & SoTL

Western Libraries is now accepting applications for two summer teaching and learning workshops: Backward by Design Retreat and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Residency. Each of these multi-day facilitated workshops offers a mix of individual and collaborative work times in a beautiful natural setting. Both workshops include all meals and lodging, and are sponsored by Western Libraries and the Learning Commons as part of their mission to foster collaborations that enhance teaching, learning, and scholarship.

 

Backward by Design Retreat: This working retreat gives new and returning faculty and instructional staff a chance to design or revise courses, and takes place August 28-30 at the Shannon Point Marine Center in Anacortes.
 

Focused on applying the backward design framework, the retreat includes discussion of best practices for teaching and assessing writing and research and offers consultations and peer feedback on course design.  

Space is limited and priority is given to participants interested in ideas and instructional practices that improve the teaching of writing in their courses. To apply for one of the 18 spots, please complete the Backward by Design interest form by May 31, 2017.

SoTL Residency: This program gives students, faculty, and staff an opportunity to advance individual and collective research projects, (especially those that include students as co-inquirers), and takes place at the North Cascades Institute September 5-7.

The SoTL Residency includes facilitated dialogue sessions focused on teaching and learning issues, workshops focused on applying the SoTL framework across disciplines, and consultations and peer response on research projects.

Participants will also have time to work on either individual or collaborative research projects, and will be expected to share the results of their research with the Western community during the 2017-18 academic year. There are only 20 spots available, and applications are open to all students, faculty, and staff. To apply for the residency, please complete the SoTL Residency interest form by May 31, 2017.  

Questions? Please contact Sarah McDaniel, Director of Teaching & Learning and the Learning Commons, sarah.mcdaniel2@wwu.edu.

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Western Libraries Reading Series: Dr. Sandra Alfers

Sandra Alfers to Discuss Writer Else Dormitzer and Poetry of the Holocaust

Sandra Alfers, professor of German and director of the Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity at Western Washington University, will discuss her research on the poetry of the Holocaust from 4-5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 17 in Western Libraries Special Collections on the 6th floor of Wilson Library. 

The presentation is free and open to the public.

During her presentation, “Poetry after Auschwitz - Who was Else Dormitzer?" Alfers will introduce the work and life of Holocaust survivor Else Dormitzer and propose a reading of Dormitzer’s poetry collection from the Theresienstadt transit camp.

Else Dormitzer (1877-1958) was a journalist, writer, and activist, who fled her hometown of Nuremberg along with her husband, Dr. Sigmund Dormitzer, shortly after the November pogrom of 1938, also known as "Kristallnacht" (The Night of Broken Glass).

In 1943, the German occupying forces in the Netherlands, where the Dormitzers had lived after their escape from Nazi Germany, deported the couple to the Theresienstadt ghetto. While her husband did not survive the Holocaust, Else Dormitzer returned to the Netherlands and later moved to the United Kingdom. She became a British national in 1951.

With the help of the Association of Jewish Refugees, an organization based in the UK, and of Frank Harris, founder of the “Nürnberg-Fürth Survivors Group” in the U.S., Alfers was able to locate Dormitzer’s surviving relatives in Europe. They opened their extensive private family archive to her, including poetry and diaries from Theresienstadt. Alfers’ German-language book “weiter schreiben. Leben und Lyrik der Else Dormitzer” (Hentrich & Hentrich, 2015) made Dormitzer’s Holocaust writings available in Germany for the first time. The book also places Dormitzer’s contributions to cultural and social history into context as it traces her life in the 20th century.

Alfers teaches a broad range of German language, culture, and literature courses on all levels of the curriculum.

In her research, Alfers focuses on the literature of the Holocaust, particularly on German-language poetry written in Theresienstadt between 1941-1945. Her English- and German-language publications have appeared in international journals such as Monatshefte, Oxford German Studies, and Études Arméniennes Contemporaines, and her work on Theresienstadt has been translated into Czech for “Terezínské Studie A Dokumenty.” Alfers’ book on the German-Jewish activist and writer Else Dormitzer “weiter schreiben. Leben und Lyrik der Else Dormitzer” was published in late 2015 by Hentrich & Hentrich in Berlin, Germany.

This event is being offered as part of the Western Libraries Reading Series, dedicated to showcasing the scholarly and creative work of Western faculty and staff by featuring diverse speakers from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines who are engaged in research, writing, and teaching at Western.

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Get Help with Citations

Spring Citation Clinic: May 22nd-26th

Having trouble with difficult online citations? Wondering how to cite a source within a source? Stop by the Citation Clinic held in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, any time between 2-4 p.m.  Monday through Friday from May 22 through May 26 for answers to all of your citation questions.

While it is true that any time is citation time in the Studio, you can also get some extra help with all of your citation needs during the Fall Quarter Citation Clinic. Join us to learn some tips and tricks, or just drop in for one-on-one assistance. We can help you with APA, Chicago/Turabian, MLA, or any other citation style.

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Speaking of Maps: Building A Digital Atlas of the PNW

"Speaking of Maps" - Dr. Aquila Flower, May 3

Dr. Aquila Flower will present “Building a Digital Atlas of the Pacific Northwest” from 4:00-5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 3 in the Map Collection area of Western Libraries.  During her presentation, Flower will show a preview of the Atlas of the Pacific Northwest, and explore some of the fundamental geographical concepts used to make decisions regarding data processing approaches.

This event is free and open to the public.

Understanding processes and patterns that cross international borders is challenging due to a lack of data that covers both sides of the border. With support from the Border Policy Research Institute and the Huxley Spatial Institute, Dr. Flower is helping create the digital Atlas of the Pacific Northwest, an online geospatial data clearinghouse designed to hold seamless cross-border datasets.

“Many geospatial datasets are available only for one specific county. This can create the impression that the world vanishes on the other side of an international border, and is a serious impediment to research and policy decisions,” explained Flower. “Even if you can collect datasets for different countries, you'll often find that they have incompatible geographies, and that the variables they contain were recorded in different units and for different dates.”

Her first addition to the Atlas uses census records from Washington and British Columbia, which allow for seamless analysis of demographic change across the US-Canada border to create a harmonized database of human demography characteristics.  

“Knowing where people live, and how population is likely to change in the near future is critical for making policy decisions. However, census records from the US and Canada are difficult to compare because they are collected in different years, define some variables differently, and the official geospatial datasets do not line up perfectly at the border,” said Flower.

The single dataset will make it easier to compare census records from the US and Canada, and will have consistent spatial characteristics, temporal coverage, and variable definitions that can be useful to policy makers, researchers, and the general public in understanding past, current, and future population distributions in Washington and British Columbia.

Dr. Aquila Flower is an assistant professor of geography at Western where she teaches physical geography and Geographic Information Science courses. Her research focuses primarily on the complex, interactive effects of climate variability, human land use patterns, and natural disturbances on forest ecosystems.

This event is co-sponsored by Western Libraries, Border Policy Research Institute, Huxley Spatial Institute, and Huxley College of the Environment, and is part of the “Speaking of Maps” program, which are quarterly talks are designed to highlight the use and value of maps in research, in teaching and learning, and in daily life.

For more information about the Map Collection or about this event, contact Dennis Matthews, WWU Map Collection manager, at (360) 650-3272 or Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu.

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