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"The Day After," Nov. 13

Posted on: November 1, 2018

Topic(s): Events

Masters of Asian Cinema: “The Day After,” Nov. 13

photo of a woman's face, from the film "The Day After"The next Masters of Asian Cinema film is The Day After, which screens at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13,  2018 at the Pickford Film Center (1318 Bay Street.)

The Day After is one of three films the prolific Hong Sang-soo released in 2017.  Like many Hong films, this movie focuses on characters in creative professions, in this case a famous author and publisher who hires a new employee, played by Kim Min-hee (who starred in The Handmaiden). Over the course of the film, more is learned about the publisher’s former employee, his wife, and Kim’s character. In typical Hong style, there are subtle games within this narrative that keep the audience guessing throughout the film.  The result is a lighthearted film with serious undertones.

Co-sponsored by Western Libraries and the Pickford Film Center, the Masters of Asian Cinema series continues the rich tradition that began with the Masters of Japanese Cinema series, one of the Pickford's longest running and most popular series. Each film in the Masters of Asian Cinema series begins with an introduction from select speakers including local professors, artists, and educators. Series curator and librarian from Western Washington University, Jeff Purdue, will introduce The Day After.


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Map Collection Open House Nov. 14

Posted on: October 30, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Western Libraries hosts Map Collection Open House Nov. 14

In partnership with Huxley College of the Environment and to celebrate Geography Awareness Week, the Western Libraries will host an Open House for the Map Collection in its new location in Wilson 2 East on Wednesday, November 14, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.

After seven years on the first floor of Wilson Library, the Map Collection has moved to a more prominent location alongside the Tutoring Center and the Daylight Lounge on the main floor of Wilson. The move was part of a larger project to relocate the Disability Access Center and Veterans Services to the first floor of Wilson Library.  Work on the maps portion of the relocation took place primarily over the summer and during the first part of fall quarter. Western Libraries staff and faculty express their appreciation to all library users for their patience and understanding during this period.

Open as of early November, the Map Collection invites users to engage with the Libraries’ 75,000 maps, globes, and atlases. The location also offers a new enhanced and improved destination study space and event space. During the Open House celebration, guests can explore the new area, enjoy light refreshments, and learn about some of the resources and services available in the Map Collection, including one-on-one consultations and research help, instruction sessions, workshops, and tours of the Map Collection.

The Map Collection houses a wide variety of resources, including topographic maps of the western United States and Canada, nautical and aeronautical charts, globes, and gazetteers. While maps are available for most geographic areas, the collection is particularly focused on maps of the Pacific Northwest.

For information about this event, please contact: Madeline Kelly (Madeline.Kelly@wwu.edu) or Dennis Matthews (Dennis.Matthews@wwu.edu).

For information about other Geography Awareness Week events, please contact Aquila Flower, Aquila.Flower@wwu.edu (360) 650-6487.


Read more: Map Collection Open House Nov. 14


Join us for TUEx: User Experience Tuesdays

Posted on: October 8, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events, Resources

TUEx Returns to Western Libraries

Have you ever had a frustrating time navigating a website? Maybe the site didn’t make sense and you couldn’t find what you needed? Western Libraries is trying to avoid those problems by improving our website users’ experiences through usability and design testing. And you can help us!

On Tuesdays between noon and 2:00 p.m., we are inviting volunteers to run through some short exercises designed to inform the Libraries on the learnability, effectiveness, and efficiency of various online resources. We need input from students, staff, and faculty, and if you can give us 5 to 10 minutes of your time, you can help us improve your (and everyone’s!) library experience. Think of it as fine-tuning. Our table will be near the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio on the second floor of Haggard Hall, next to the “TUEx User Experience Tuesdays” sign.  


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New Questions from TLA

Posted on: September 28, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Fall Quarter TLA Begins Oct. 3 & 4

How do we create a trusting learning environment? Is political correctness a form of censorship, or is it an ideal for creating fairness? Does the grading system and standardized testing help or hurt student learning? Join students, faculty, staff, and community members as they consider questions like these during this quarter’s Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) dialogue sessions. 

The TLA meets from 12-12:50 p.m. every other Wednesday and Thursday beginning October 3 and 4. No registration is required, and participants are free to drop in and join the groups even if they cannot stay for the entire session.

The TLA’s primary objective is to create a community of scholars who work together to enhance teaching and learning by providing:

  • a cross-disciplinary space for dialogue which explores how teaching and learning can be enhanced throughout the University and beyond.
  • a forum for fostering collaboration and bridging the gaps between students, staff, faculty, and community members.
  • a space that values diverse perspectives and works towards creating active communities.  
  • professional development resources and workshops that support both scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

 

TLA participants consistently report that the TLA dialogue sessions provide a great way to connect with others outside of their disciplines and departments, and to learn more about Western’s teaching and learning culture. Many say it also gives them a chance to take a breath and just listen to what others, especially students, really think. The goals of each dialogue session are to share well-rounded views related to teaching and learning while encouraging the use of listening to understand and appreciate differences, and promoting open-mindedness and mutual respect for diverse perspectives.  

For more information, see http://library.wwu.edu/tla.  To sign up for the TLA listserv, email TLA@wwu.edu(Students: there is also an opportunity to participate in the TLA for LIBR 340 “Speaking and Listening” practicum credit. For more information, contact:  Shevell.Thibou@wwu.edu.)


Read more: New Questions from TLA


Western Libraries Responds

Posted on: April 11, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events, Feature Stories

WWU holds event to replace vandalized books

This article is written by Mary Gallagher and is courtesy of the Office of Communications and Marketing at Western. It originally appeared in Western Today on April 10, 2018 and can be viewed here.

Members of the Western community who have responded to the destruction and vandalism of books in Western’s Jewish Studies Collection have replaced the books and grown the collection, illustrating the community’s resolve against acts of antisemitism and other forms of hate, bigotry and violence, said speakers at a Western Libraries event Tuesday morning.

“Whether campus is your home, or you live in Bellingham or beyond, we are all one community,” said President Sabah Randhawa. “We are united in opposition against these acts of antisemitic vandalism, and against all such acts of hatred and bigotry. This kind of cowardly action perfectly illustrates the nature of hate and bigotry, because it flourishes in darkness and withers when exposed to the light of reason and intellectual scrutiny.”

More than 250 students, faculty, staff and community members crowded into the Wilson Library Reading Room for the event, which was a response to acts of destruction and vandalism of books in Western’s Jewish Studies collection.

“The deliberate destruction of library books, along with hateful slurs written in them, constitutes a reprehensible, criminal act that will not be tolerated,” said Dean of Libraries Mark Greenberg. Tuesday's show of solidarity, along with replacing the books and adding to the collection, show that as a community, “we vigorously oppose acts of bigotry and hate against the Jewish community and against all minoritized and marginalized groups,” Greenberg said.

The destruction of the books was appalling and upsetting, Randhawa said, in part because “this particular activity occurred in our library, the heart of our institution – of any academic institution – and involved the destruction of the very objects of knowledge itself.”

As outlined in last year’s report from Western’s Taskforce on Preventing and Responding to Antisemitism, Randhawa said, all forms of racism, bias and hate are interconnected and must be fought on a united front.

“Democratic institutions and values are not automatically sustained,” he said. “One of the central mandates of education is to examine what it means to be a responsible citizen and to ensure that human values are appreciated, nurtured and protected. Silence and indifference to the suffering of others, or to the infringements of civil rights in any society, can perpetuate these problems.”

German Professor Sandra Alfers, director of the Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, said that as someone who grew up in post-war West Germany, the destruction of books “conjures up particularly disturbing ghosts from the past.”

“Thanks to the support of many, our shelves in Wilson Library do not remain empty, and so we have replaced books that were destroyed and added traditional and new formats in written, oral and visual form to enhance our collection,” Alfers said. “More than 120 items have been added thus far, some of them not held by any other library in the state.”

But more work needs to be done, Alfers said. Hate crimes and violence against minority groups are on the rise in the U.S. as islamophobia, antisemitism, anti-immigrant sentiment and Holocaust distortion and denial are becoming more common around the globe.

“Reports can be shelved and forgotten,” Alfers said. “So, commit yourself to being engaged, to actively thoughtfully, and respectfully be building bridges, not walls, and creating much-needed change. To seek knowledge and to apply it. Therein lies your – our – responsibility as we stand up in unity to antisemitism, hate and bigotry.”


Read more: Western Libraries Responds


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