news topics

You are Viewing - Events

New Exhibit: "Nobody Goes Home Sad"

Posted on: March 15, 2019

Topic(s): Updates, Events

New Exhibit at Western Libraries Featuring Beat Poets

Allen Ginsberg reading "Howl," Nov. 1955, from the Walter Lehrman Collection at Utah State University.

Western Libraries Heritage Resources will host a new exhibition beginning April 1, 2019, featuring several important figures of the Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, and Jack Kerouac.

“Nobody Goes Home Sad: Photographs of the Gallery 6 Poets, 1955-2015,” is a traveling exhibition on loan to Western from Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library, Special Collections & Archives Division.

On display through June 28, 2019, the exhibit will be available for viewing Monday-Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed weekends and holidays) in Western Washington University Libraries’ Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor). It is free and open to the public.

“Nobody Goes Home Sad” features black-and-white portraits and performance shots of Beat poets Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, Michael McClure, Philip Lamantia, and Jack Kerouac. The photographic material comprises the work of two photographers, Walter Lehrman and John Suiter, who captured images of several of the Bay Area poets from the mid-1950s to around the 1990s.

In addition to 36 framed photographs, the show includes rare first editions, chapbooks, broadsides, and ephemera selected from Utah State’s extensive Beat Poetry and Little Magazine collection. Remastered audio-recordings of the poets reading at Berkeley’s Town Hall Theatre in 1956 are also featured.

For more information, please contact Tamara Belts, Special Collections Manager, Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu, (360) 650-3193.


Read more: New Exhibit: "Nobody Goes Home Sad"


"Canines & Cats on Campus" Return!

Posted on: March 8, 2019

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Canines & Cats on Campus Program Visits WWU

photo of students visiting with two of the dog volunteers with the Canines and Cats on Campus program.Western Libraries will once again be joined by members of the “Canines & Cats on Campus” registered therapy animal program from Monday, March 11 through the morning of Thursday, March 21. 

Teams of humans and animals will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Mann Family Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library off and on between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. during both the week preceding and the week of final exams. 

During this two-week period, this space will be reserved exclusively for the registered Canines & Cats on Campus therapy animal program, and animals who are not official volunteers with this program are not permitted in this area. 

Additionally, Western Libraries would like to remind everyone that while ADA service animals are welcome in the library, pets may not be brought into library facilities at any time.

For more information about the upcoming Canines & Cats on Campus visit, a schedule which includes the names of the volunteers, photos of the animals, and the times when they will be available for visiting, will be posted on an easel in the designated gallery area beginning Monday, March 11.

Remember to stop by the library to say hi or de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!  


Read more: "Canines & Cats on Campus" Return!


New Exhibit: "Hello Dear Enemy!"

Posted on: January 8, 2019

Topic(s): Updates, Events

New Exhibit:  “Hello, Dear Enemy! Picture Books for Peace and Humanity”

An exhibit of printed posters featuring images and text from picture books that provide an international perspective on conflict, peace, and humanity, will be on display on the 3rd & 4th floors of the Wilson Library building at Western Washington University Libraries from January 7 through March 22, 2019.
 
An opening celebration reception with refreshments will be held on Wednesday, January 23 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Wilson Library Reading Room. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to the public. The exhibit is available for viewing during all hours Western Libraries is open.
 

Conceived by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany, the exhibit offers an international selection of unique and striking picture books that explore themes such as: Experiences of War, Destruction, and Displacement; Power Struggles and the Origin and Escalation of Violence; Prejudice, Ostracism, and Imagined Enemies; Utopias of Peace and Anti-War Books. In addition to the powerful exhibit posters, classroom response work and projects will be on display.

Among the books featured are a few classics of children’s literature, but the majority of the titles were published in the last fifteen years. They tell stories about everyday life in conflict zones, about suppression, displacement, and persecution, about borders that turn people away, about threats and injuries. They reveal the sources of war and violence, such as xenophobia, prejudice, and the abuse of power.

At the same time, many of these picture books ultimately open the door to a better future in which dividing walls topple, enemies reconcile, and war gives way to peace. Many of these books communicate the message that openness, curiosity, and empathy are prerequisites for a more peaceful and humane coexistence between cultures and peoples.

This exhibit was made possible by Western Libraries, Woodring College of Education, Western’s Department of English, and The Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity. For more information about the exhibit, please see: http://libguides.wwu.edu/clic/hello-dear-enemy. If you have questions, or if you would like to arrange a class or large group visit, please contact:  Desiree.Cueto@wwu.edu (360) 650 – 2339 & Sylvia.Tag@wwu.edu (360) 650 – 7992.

* Image Citation/Credit Information: ​Mario Ramos, from: "Le petit soldat qui cherchait la guerre" L’École des Loisirs: Paris, 1998.


Read more: New Exhibit: "Hello Dear Enemy!"


New TLA Questions & Dialogue Sessions

Posted on: December 20, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events

TLA Dialogue Questions for Winter 2019

How does safety influence our educational experiences? Is obtaining an education a political act? How does resistance to change and fear of the unknown influence academia and impact our own lives?  Join students, faculty, staff, and community members as they consider questions like these during this quarter’s Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) dialogue sessions.

The TLA meets from 12-12:50 p.m. every other Wednesday and Thursday beginning January 16 and 17 in Haggard Hall Room 222.

No registration is required, and participants are free to drop in and join the groups even if they cannot stay for the entire session.

Two of the dialogue questions this quarter are offered in affiliation with the Western Reads program, and are designed to complement specific selections from the book, Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements.

Dates and questions are listed below:

  • Jan 16 & 17: How does safety influence our educational experiences?

  • Jan 30 & 31: How does resistance to change and fear of the unknown influence academia and impact your own life? (affiliated with the chapter “Small and Bright” from the 2018 Western Reads book, Octavia’s Brood).

  • Feb 13 & 14: Is obtaining an education a political act?  Update: Please note the Feb. 13 & 14 sessions have been cancelled due to inclement weather.

  • Feb 27 & 28: In what ways do we as an institution, community, and individuals both uphold and combat systems of racial inequality and "token"ization? (affiliated with the chapter “The Token Superhero,” from the  2018 Western Reads book, Octavia’s Brood)

  • Mar 13 & 14: What takes priority, a learner's creativity or the institution's expectations?

Participants in TLA consistently report that the dialogue sessions provide a great way to connect with others outside of their disciplines and departments, and to learn more about Western’s teaching and learning culture. Many say it also gives them a chance to take a breath and just listen to what others, especially students, really think.

The goals of each dialogue session are to share well-rounded views related to teaching and learning, while encouraging the use of listening to understand and appreciate differences, and promoting open-mindedness and mutual respect for diverse perspectives.  

For more information, see http://library.wwu.edu/tla.  To sign up for the TLA listserv, email TLA@wwu.edu. (Students: there is also an opportunity to participate in the TLA for LIBR 340 “Speaking and Listening” practicum credit. For more information, contact:  Shevell.Thibou@wwu.edu.)


Read more: New TLA Questions & Dialogue Sessions


Western Libraries Responds

Posted on: April 11, 2018

Topic(s): Updates, Events, Feature Stories

WWU holds event to replace vandalized books

This article is written by Mary Gallagher and is courtesy of the Office of Communications and Marketing at Western. It originally appeared in Western Today on April 10, 2018 and can be viewed here.

Members of the Western community who have responded to the destruction and vandalism of books in Western’s Jewish Studies Collection have replaced the books and grown the collection, illustrating the community’s resolve against acts of antisemitism and other forms of hate, bigotry and violence, said speakers at a Western Libraries event Tuesday morning.

“Whether campus is your home, or you live in Bellingham or beyond, we are all one community,” said President Sabah Randhawa. “We are united in opposition against these acts of antisemitic vandalism, and against all such acts of hatred and bigotry. This kind of cowardly action perfectly illustrates the nature of hate and bigotry, because it flourishes in darkness and withers when exposed to the light of reason and intellectual scrutiny.”

More than 250 students, faculty, staff and community members crowded into the Wilson Library Reading Room for the event, which was a response to acts of destruction and vandalism of books in Western’s Jewish Studies collection.

“The deliberate destruction of library books, along with hateful slurs written in them, constitutes a reprehensible, criminal act that will not be tolerated,” said Dean of Libraries Mark Greenberg. Tuesday's show of solidarity, along with replacing the books and adding to the collection, show that as a community, “we vigorously oppose acts of bigotry and hate against the Jewish community and against all minoritized and marginalized groups,” Greenberg said.

The destruction of the books was appalling and upsetting, Randhawa said, in part because “this particular activity occurred in our library, the heart of our institution – of any academic institution – and involved the destruction of the very objects of knowledge itself.”

As outlined in last year’s report from Western’s Taskforce on Preventing and Responding to Antisemitism, Randhawa said, all forms of racism, bias and hate are interconnected and must be fought on a united front.

“Democratic institutions and values are not automatically sustained,” he said. “One of the central mandates of education is to examine what it means to be a responsible citizen and to ensure that human values are appreciated, nurtured and protected. Silence and indifference to the suffering of others, or to the infringements of civil rights in any society, can perpetuate these problems.”

German Professor Sandra Alfers, director of the Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, said that as someone who grew up in post-war West Germany, the destruction of books “conjures up particularly disturbing ghosts from the past.”

“Thanks to the support of many, our shelves in Wilson Library do not remain empty, and so we have replaced books that were destroyed and added traditional and new formats in written, oral and visual form to enhance our collection,” Alfers said. “More than 120 items have been added thus far, some of them not held by any other library in the state.”

But more work needs to be done, Alfers said. Hate crimes and violence against minority groups are on the rise in the U.S. as islamophobia, antisemitism, anti-immigrant sentiment and Holocaust distortion and denial are becoming more common around the globe.

“Reports can be shelved and forgotten,” Alfers said. “So, commit yourself to being engaged, to actively thoughtfully, and respectfully be building bridges, not walls, and creating much-needed change. To seek knowledge and to apply it. Therein lies your – our – responsibility as we stand up in unity to antisemitism, hate and bigotry.”


Read more: Western Libraries Responds


Pages