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WIS Event: Roots of Rhetoric

Posted on: Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 4:08pm

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Roots of Rhetoric and Writing in the Liberal Arts 

Writing Instruction Support (WIS) is sponsoring an off-campus reading and discussion event for faculty and instructors on Friday May 5, from 4:15-5:15pm. (Please note: this event replaces the one originally scheduled for Friday, April 21st).
 
"Roots of Rhetoric and Writing in the Liberal Arts" will take place at Aslan Brewery here in Bellingham (1313 N. Forest St.). This is a child-friendly location so if you have kids, bring them along!  Join us for an informal discussion of some of the oldest writing on rhetoric and education, Gorgias's "The Encomium of Helen" and "On What is Not or On Nature," and together we’ll consider questions like:
 
o   What purpose should the study of rhetoric and writing serve in a liberal arts curriculum?
o   Is writing a practical skill? A philosophical discipline for the pursuit of wisdom? 
 

RSVPs are appreciated but not required. Please send comments and questions to Julie Dugger, Director of Writing Instruction Support.  Unable to come, but interested in the topic? Click on this link for more info.

Read more: WIS Event: Roots of Rhetoric


Connecting Communities

Posted on: Monday, April 17, 2017 - 3:04pm

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Connecting Communities Through Service April 28

The Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) invites students, faculty, staff, and community members to come together for a day of service on Friday, April 28, 2017. Sign up to volunteer during a time of your choosing for one of four different organizations, located both on and off campus.  (Note to WWU staff: this is a great opportunity to use all or part of your “Community Service Day” benefit!)

In 2014, the TLA proposed the creation of a trust-building event in response to that year’s BIG question: How do we ignite individual passion, purpose, and potential to co-create a culture of trust?  The result was an annual spring day of service as part of National Volunteer Week. Besides providing some important service hours to the chosen organization, this event also offers Western employees, students, and community members an opportunity to develop and sustain ongoing relationships by connecting people to local organizations through service to the community.

Volunteer projects include:

  • Lend a Helping Hand: Harriet Spanel Park in the York Neighborhood (off-campus)
  • Comfort Kids Project: The Bellingham Sock Monkey Project (on-campus)
  • Volunteer Chore Program (off-campus)
  • Kitchen Items Drive for House 2 Home (off-campus)

 

Sign up online to reserve your spot! For more information, go to: http://library.wwu.edu/tla_events or email TLA@wwu.edu.

Here’s hoping you’ll join us in service and show how we are all Active Minds Changing Lives!

Read more: Connecting Communities


Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community

Posted on: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 1:49pm

Topic(s): Newsletters

The Spring 2017 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue you will learn about a variety of Heritage Resources' collections which document local and regional artistic culture, including the digitized correspondence of Skagit County artists, photographs and oral histories related to campus sculpture, and a recent donation of valuable photography books.

Heritage Resources consists of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: Isamu Noguchi at the dedication ceremony for Skyviewing Sculpture, 1969, Campus History Collection, Special Collections.

Read more: Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community


Jewell Parker Rhodes April 19 & 20

Posted on: Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 8:42am

Topic(s): Updates, Events

Award-winning author & teacher Jewell Parker Rhodes visits Bellingham April 19 & 20

Award-winning youth and adult author and teacher Jewell Parker Rhodes will discuss her powerful novels, Towers Falling and Ninth Ward, at two free presentations in Bellingham.
 
Rhodes will speak at Bellingham Public Library on April 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and at the Whatcom Museum on April 20, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
 
Hear Rhodes discuss her powerful, insightful novels and learn more about navigating difficult concepts, events, and conversations through story. Rhodes' books and presentations are recommended for everyone from upper elementary school age through adults. 
 
Dr. Jewell Parker Rhodes is the author of the Louisiana Girls children's book trilogy, which includes Ninth WardSugar, and Bayou Magic. Her children's books have received the Parents' Choice Foundation Award and the Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award, among others. Towers Falling, her new middle grade novel, was published in 2016. She is also the author of six adult novels, a memoir, and two writing guides. Her adult literary awards include the American Book Award, the National Endowment of the Arts Award in Fiction, and others. 
 
These events are co-sponsored by Village Books, Bellingham Public Library, Western Washington University Libraries, and the Whatcom Museum, with funding support from Friends of the Bellingham Public Library. (Additional thanks to Rhodes, who has committed to donating her speaking fees toward the purchase of new books for local schools.)

Read more: Jewell Parker Rhodes April 19 & 20


'Rising Tide in Cascadia' & 'Street Life, Kolkata India'

Posted on: Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 11:21am

Topic(s): Updates, Exhibits

Western Libraries Hosts Two New Art Exhibits 

"Rising Tide in Cascadia" (Galleries 2 & 4) was created to promote awareness of the effects of climate change and recently appeared at the Mindport Museum on Holly Street in Bellingham.

This exhibit features framed and matted pairs of photographs of local landmarks with the first photo of each pair showing a recognizable local landmark in its current state combined with a second photo that shows what landmark will look like if we fail to take action against climate change. This exhibit will be on display from now through May 20, 2017. 

The creators of this exhibit are Alan Sanders and Warren Sheay. Sanders has been a professional photographer for the past 4 decades and has taught at the University of Alaska and Western Washington University. Sanders currently conducts workshops at Whatcom Community College and performs digital imaging at the Quicksilver Photo Lab in Bellingham.  By undertaking the significant technical challenges of this project, Sanders demonstrated his firm commitment to help educate people about climate change.  

Sheay has also been an educator for many years and is also a self-described “average citizen concerned about climate change.”  After reading Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything, he was inspired to help create a local statement that would foster awareness about “our planet’s precarious condition.”  

"Street Life, Kolkata India," is also on display now through June 1, 2017 (Gallery 1). This exhibit was created by WWU Design Professor, Darby Roach, who recently traveled to India as part of an international bicycle trip.  Roach wrote a book about this trip and included excerpts from the chapter on Kolkata to create a linear narrative to go with the 'street' photography that is featured in this exhibit. 

Read more: 'Rising Tide in Cascadia' & 'Street Life, Kolkata India'


Western Tableaux: Redux

Posted on: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 11:42am

Topic(s): Updates, Exhibits

New Exhibit Features WWU History

Western Students Protest Kent State and Jackson State Killings, 1970 / from the Campus History Collection, Special Collections, Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Western Washington University.     

 

Western Libraries Heritage Resources holds vast documentation related to the history of Western Washington University, and beginning March 28, 2017 a retrospective exhibit, featuring historical photographs and other memorabilia illustrating Western’s twelve vibrant decades of institutional life, will bring to light some of these treasures.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and is available for viewing through June 9  in Western Libraries Special Collections Monday – Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed weekends and holidays).

Originally developed for the WWU Centennial Celebration in 1999-2000, the exhibit entitled “Western Tableaux: Redux,” has been updated to reflect Western’s history to the present date. By documenting key events associated with the academic, administrative, and social life of Western, this exhibit unveils pieces of local, state, and national stories.

Through a decade-by-decade series of images, viewers will be able to follow the institution’s trajectory from its earliest days as a normal (teachers’) school, through the expansion of its physical environment and curriculum, and transitions in leadership, programming, and the dynamic and evolving student body.

Read more: Western Tableaux: Redux


Spring TLA Begins April 5th & 6th

Posted on: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 8:09am

Topic(s): Updates, Events, Resources

Sign Up for Spring TLA Dialogue Sessions

The  Teaching-Learning Academy’s (TLA) at Western Libraries is the central forum for the scholarship of teaching and learning at Western Washington University, bringing together a broad spectrum of perspectives from throughout the university community.

TLA participants, which include students, faculty, staff, and community members, worked collectively throughout fall and winter quarters to create and explore a shared dialogue question that addresses how we can better enhance the teaching and learning environment at Western.

“How do we learn from one another through meaningful dialogue that addresses fear and creates active communities?” is the “BIG” question for 2016-2017. Action proposals that address this BIG study question will be developed during the spring quarter TLA sessions, and anyone interested is invited to attend, whether or not they were part of the fall and winter dialogue groups.

Participants continue to report that the TLA is a great way to connect with others outside of their departments, and to learn more about Western’s teaching and learning culture. Many say it also gives them a chance to take a breath and just listen to what others, especially students, really think. Others express satisfaction in being able to advance real action steps in making Western an even better place to teach and learn.

Sessions begin Apr. 5th and 6th, and meet every other week for a total of four meetings during the quarter. While the sessions are 80 minutes long, attendees are welcome to come for whatever time they have available. Many faculty and staff who cannot stay the entire time will participate for the first 50 minutes, as there is a logical break then.

There are four dialogue group options:

  • Wednesdays noon-1:20 pm (Apr. 5, 19, May 3, & 17)
  • Wednesdays 2-3:20 pm (Apr. 5, 19, May 3, & 17)
  • Thursdays noon-1:20 pm (Apr. 6, 20, May 4, & 18)
  • Thursdays 2-3:20 pm (Apr. 6, 20, May 4, & 18)
  •  

For more information, see http://library.wwu.edu/tla.  To sign up for a regular dialogue group and get on the listserv, email TLA@wwu.edu. (Students: there is also an opportunity to participate in the TLA for LIBR practicum credit. For more information, contact Shevell.Thibou@wwu.edu.)

Read more: Spring TLA Begins April 5th & 6th


Connecting Literature to Life

Posted on: Thursday, March 2, 2017 - 11:55am

Topic(s): Updates, Feature Stories, Exhibits, Resources

Connecting Literature to Life: Childhood Inspiration Comes Full Circle

Keri Krout can still recall the long hot California summers of her childhood, and how they were marked by each arrival from the mail-order Scholastic book club. Krout and her siblings would gather around their mother, eagerly watching as she opened up the cardboard wrapping that encased the book.  But the one book Krout remembers most of all is Andrew Henry’s Meadow, written and illustrated by Doris (Wernstedt) Burn.

“We not only read her story, but I remember studying the pictures for hours and imagining my life in a meadow full of friends,” explained Krout. “My home of choice was the bird house built up in the sky. I imagined what a cool breeze would feel like, and the sound of the birds singing just to me.”

 Andrew Henry's Meadow is the story of a boy who feels ignored and unappreciated by his family and decides to build a special retreat for himself in a nearby meadow. Other children from the neighborhood join him, so he builds houses for them as well, each one customized to complement their interests and hobbies.

“My brother and I attempted to build a pulley system in his bedroom like Andrew Henry built for his younger brothers, but I admit our attempts fell short,” said Krout. She noted that while other books continued to arrive in the mail, it was Andrew Henry’s Meadow that impacted her the most.

“I grew up working with children,” said Krout, who now works as the manager of the Associated Students Child Development Center (CDC) at Western Washington University. “I think perhaps I understand children’s need to have their own space thanks to Andrew Henry.”

Krout recalled how her favorite childhood story resurfaced when she first began working at Western as she walked through The Outback on her way to work. She encountered a small cabin and was astonished to learn its connection to Doris Burn, as the cabin had once belonged to June and Farrar Burn, Doris Burn’s parents-in-law.

“My beginning started with a simple story of the need to create, to escape, to be understood and accepted.  And here I was, standing by the cabin which had belonged to the family of the woman whose life and creating influenced mine in ways I’m sure I can’t count.  I felt a sense of utter gratitude of how life can take a person full circle,” Krout explained.

Krout relayed this experience to some of the families of the CDC, and one of the parents later emailed her about a special exhibition featuring the work of Doris Burn that was on display at Western Libraries. As part of this exhibition, Doris Burn’s daughter, the local author and multi-dimensional artist Skye Burn, was scheduled to give a special public presentation about the life and legacy of her mother. Krout knew immediately she would attend this event, and following Skye’s talk, the two women finally met in person.

“What an honor to meet her daughter and to bask in the glow of creative genius,” said Krout. “How can I begin to even thank Doris and her family?”

Burn’s work continues to speak to readers of all ages, and since her death in 2011, Andrew Henry’s Meadow has been reissued by Penguin’s Philomel Books. The title has also been published and is presently available in translation in Korea, China and Japan.  Andrew Henry's Meadow won the Washington Governor's Art Award and was a Weekly Reader book club selection.

 “Plenty of Things to Do: The Work of Northwest Children’s Author Doris Burn,” will remain on display through March 10th, and is available for viewing weekdays Monday – Friday in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor) between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.  Additionallydigital version of the Doris Burn exhibit is now available online, as are detailed collection guides to the Doris Burn Artwork and Manuscripts and related collections of June and Farrar Burn Papers and South Burn Papers, housed and available at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC. These materials help document the cultural and artistic history of the Pacific Northwest region and were created by an artist and writer who sought specifically to engage with the needs, interests, and creativity of a younger audience.

Skye Burn’s talk, “The Strength of a Dream: A Daughter's Portrait of a Northwest Children's Author and Illustrator,” can be found in Western CEDAR and is viewable from this link.

Read more: Connecting Literature to Life


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