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Intersession & Summer Hours

Posted on: Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 4:14pm

Topic(s): Updates

Library Hours for Intersession and Summer Quarter

Western Libraries will be open during the intersession (June 12th - June 19th) Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., closed weekends.

During the summer session, (June 20th – August 18th), Western Libraries will be open Monday - Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed weekends.

The Map Collection area of the Libraries will be closed June 12-16, and will be open Monday - Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 19-August 18.

Heritage Resources will be open throughout the summer session with a few posted exceptions. Hours of operation for each of the three units (Special Collections, the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, and University Archives & Records Management) can be found here.

The Hacherl Research & Writing Studio is open online during Summer Session from June 20th through August 18th. You can submit a draft online or chat with Studio staff by going to https://library.wwu.edu/rws/connect. If you would like to schedule an in-person meeting with Studio staff, please email rws@wwu.edu.

Read more: Intersession & Summer Hours


Jack Berryman to Speak About Fly Fishing Pioneers

Posted on: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 1:38pm

Topic(s): Events

Jack Berryman to Speak About Northwest Fly Fishing Pioneers: Ralph Wahl, Ralph Olson, and Alfred Knudson

 
Noted fly fishing writer and photographer Jack Berryman will give a talk entitled “Three Steelhead Fly Fishing Pioneers in the Northwest: Wahl, Olson and Knudson, 1900-1990” on Tuesday, July 11th at 2:00 p.m. in Western Libraries Special Collections (Wilson Library 6th floor).
 
The event is free and open to the public.
 
In his talk, Berryman will present a biographical summary of the career and contributions of three renowned Northwest steelhead fly fishing pioneers, Ralph Wahl and Ralph Olson (who are featured in Berryman’s book, Fly-Fishing Pioneers & Legends of the Northwest) and Alfred Knusdon (who was the subject of one of Berryman’s past columns in Northwest Fly Fishing). Berryman will detail the contributions of each individual to the sport and culture of fly fishing, illustrating his talk with slides. 
 
Jack Berryman grew up in central Pennsylvania fishing trout and bass, and hunting both small and large game. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland and was hired by the University of Washington’s School of Medicine in 1975. After moving to the Pacific Northwest, he became even more enamored with fishing, spending many summers guiding on Alaska’s Kenai River. In 1986, he began a freelance writing and photography career, ultimately publishing over 300 articles and numerous photographs in a wide variety of adventure, travel and outdoor magazines. 
 
Berryman is a member of the Society of Environmental Journalists and a past columnist for Salmon Trout Steelheader and Northwest Fly Fishing. His most recent book, Fly-Fishing Pioneers & Legends of the Northwest (2006) won the 2007 Outdoor Writers Association of America’s Excellence in Craft Award for best book. 
 
For more information about the event, please contact Tamara Belts, Special Collections Manager, at (360) 650-3193 or Tamara.Belts@wwu.edu. 

Read more: Jack Berryman to Speak About Fly Fishing Pioneers


Supporting Student Professional Development

Posted on: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 7:55am

Topic(s): Feature Stories

Supporting Student Employee Professional Development 

At Western Washington University, student employees play an integral role in helping the Libraries fulfill its teaching and learning mission. Whether through providing research and writing assistance in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, dialogue facilitation in the Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA), or by sharing their energy, expertise, and insights in the day-to-day activities that help the Libraries function effectively, the contributions and dedication of library student employees are essential to the successful advancement of Western Libraries' mission. 

In addition to their daily work, some students also engage in professional development and  research activities, which may include presentations at national and international conferences. For example, as part of their first year as assistants in the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio, student employees develop a research topic related to Studio scholarship and practice, which they later share in the form of “legacy projects.” They may also choose to submit their work as proposals for conference presentations.

Last fall, sixteen Studio student assistants attended the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW). Of those sixteen, fifteen students gave presentations where they spoke about their research and the results of their legacy projects with conference attendees.

“Studio assistants tell us that the seminar and the opportunity to design and present a research project to a broader community of practice  has a huge impact on their academic and professional skills and lives,” explained Pippa Hemsley, Assistant Director of the Hacherl Research & Writing Studio. While an undergraduate student at Western, Hemsley was herself  a student assistant in the former Writing Center.

Last fall, two additional library student employees presented at a different conference, the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL), held in Los Angeles, California. Autumn Simmons and Nathan Romond, (who both work for the TLA), gave a joint presentation about the use of dialogue and the practice of intentionally flattening hierarchies to eliminate barriers in teaching and learning.

“Autumn and I were able to present our work to an audience of international scholars, many of whom were faculty,” explained Romond. He noted that their presentation embodied what they were speaking about, “underscoring the idea that students can engage more personally and deeply with work when operating in an environment that incorporates a flattened hierarchy among students and faculty.”

Both Simmons and Romond described their time at ISSoTL as one of the most memorable and significant experiences of their undergraduate education.

“As an undergraduate, the ability to meet with so many academic professionals and share work being done felt like a privilege,” stated Simmons. “This sharing of knowledge, and the connections made along the way is what makes this conference so special and necessary in order to maximize the benefits of higher education.”

Western Libraries relies on the generosity of its donors to make these life-changing opportunities possible. Philanthropic gifts help support library student employees by funding registration fees, travel expenses, and other associated costs of participating in conferences and other research opportunities that advance the libraries' teaching and learning mission"

 If you would like to help, please consider contributing to the Western Libraries Student Employee Opportunity Fund. And a special thank you goes out to everyone who has already contributed to this fund , whether on WWU Give Day or now!

Read more: Supporting Student Professional Development


Undergraduate Research Award Winners

Posted on: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:16am

Topic(s): Updates

Announcing the 2016-2017 Western Libraries Undergraduate Award Winners!

Winners of this year’s Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award were honored at a small reception in the library on June 9th, during which Dean of Libraries Mark Greenberg recognized the award-winning students for their accomplishments, and presented each awardee with a certificate. Friends, family members of the award-winning students, the students’ faculty mentors, and members of the 2016-2017 Undergraduate Research Award review committee were also in attendance. This year's winners are:

  • Christina Becker,  "Framing the Frat Boy: an analysis of frames used in coverage of campus rape by The New York Times," (Faculty Mentor: Brian J. Bowe, Journalism).
  • Nicole Carroll, "A New Look at the Constitutional Convention and State Ratifying Conventions: How Reason and Interest Played a Role," (Faculty Mentor: Johann Neem, History).
  • Jeffrey Guptil, "The Grammaticalization of because in Standard English," (Faculty Mentor: Janet Xing, Linguistics).

 

Three Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Awards are given annually to Western Washington University undergraduate students in recognition of their excellence and originality in creating research papers for courses taught across the colleges based on significant inquiry using library resources and collections. Each winner of the Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award receives a certificate, a cash award of $500.00, and publication of their prize-winning paper in Western CEDAR, Western Washington University’s institutional repository. 

Every spring, a review committee consisting of a variety of faculty members from the Libraries and other departments at Western selects from among the submissions three papers which demonstrate excellence in the creation of research papers for courses taught across the colleges. Papers must be based on significant inquiry using library resources and collections, and they must demonstrate originality or the potential to lead to subsequent original research. 

Congratulations to this year's winners on their excellent work and their award-winning research! And thank you also to the Western Libraries Undergraduate Research Award committee chair Elizabeth Stephan (Libraries) and committee members Gabe Gossett (Libraries), Tim Kowalczyk (Chemistry), Glenn Tsunokai (Sociology), and Colleen Laird (Modern Languages).

Read more: Undergraduate Research Award Winners


Special Collections Closed June 26-July 5

Posted on: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 - 11:46am

Topic(s): Updates

Heritage Resources is open during summer session but individual units will be closed at various times as indicated below:

  • Special Collections will be closed Monday, June 26 through Wednesday, July 5.

This information (also available on our "Hours and Locations" page) will be updated so please check back regularly if you are planning to visit. If you have questions, please call (360) 650-7534.

Read more: Special Collections Closed June 26-July 5


Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community

Posted on: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 1:49pm

Topic(s): Newsletters

The Spring 2017 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue you will learn about a variety of Heritage Resources' collections which document local and regional artistic culture, including the digitized correspondence of Skagit County artists, photographs and oral histories related to campus sculpture, and a recent donation of valuable photography books.

Heritage Resources consists of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: Isamu Noguchi at the dedication ceremony for Skyviewing Sculpture, 1969, Campus History Collection, Special Collections.

Read more: Artistic Culture on Campus and in the Community


'Rising Tide in Cascadia' extended

Posted on: Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 11:21am

Topic(s): Updates, Exhibits

Western Libraries Art Exhibit Extended

"Rising Tide in Cascadia" (Galleries 2 & 4) was created to promote awareness of the effects of climate change and recently appeared at the Mindport Museum on Holly Street in Bellingham.

This exhibit features framed and matted pairs of photographs of local landmarks with the first photo of each pair showing a recognizable local landmark in its current state combined with a second photo that shows what landmark will look like if we fail to take action against climate change. This exhibit will be on display from now through May 20, 2017.*  *This exhibit has been extended and will remain on display through August 18, 2017.

The creators of this exhibit are Alan Sanders and Warren Sheay. Sanders has been a professional photographer for the past 4 decades and has taught at the University of Alaska and Western Washington University. Sanders currently conducts workshops at Whatcom Community College and performs digital imaging at the Quicksilver Photo Lab in Bellingham.  By undertaking the significant technical challenges of this project, Sanders demonstrated his firm commitment to help educate people about climate change.  

Sheay has also been an educator for many years and is also a self-described “average citizen concerned about climate change.”  After reading Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything, he was inspired to help create a local statement that would foster awareness about “our planet’s precarious condition.”  

 

 

Read more: 'Rising Tide in Cascadia' extended


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