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Connecting Literature to Life

Posted on: March 2, 2017

Topic(s): Updates, Feature Stories, Exhibits, Resources

Connecting Literature to Life: Childhood Inspiration Comes Full Circle

Keri Krout can still recall the long hot California summers of her childhood, and how they were marked by each arrival from the mail-order Scholastic book club. Krout and her siblings would gather around their mother, eagerly watching as she opened up the cardboard wrapping that encased the book.  But the one book Krout remembers most of all is Andrew Henry’s Meadow, written and illustrated by Doris (Wernstedt) Burn.

“We not only read her story, but I remember studying the pictures for hours and imagining my life in a meadow full of friends,” explained Krout. “My home of choice was the bird house built up in the sky. I imagined what a cool breeze would feel like, and the sound of the birds singing just to me.”

 Andrew Henry's Meadow is the story of a boy who feels ignored and unappreciated by his family and decides to build a special retreat for himself in a nearby meadow. Other children from the neighborhood join him, so he builds houses for them as well, each one customized to complement their interests and hobbies.

“My brother and I attempted to build a pulley system in his bedroom like Andrew Henry built for his younger brothers, but I admit our attempts fell short,” said Krout. She noted that while other books continued to arrive in the mail, it was Andrew Henry’s Meadow that impacted her the most.

“I grew up working with children,” said Krout, who now works as the manager of the Associated Students Child Development Center (CDC) at Western Washington University. “I think perhaps I understand children’s need to have their own space thanks to Andrew Henry.”

Krout recalled how her favorite childhood story resurfaced when she first began working at Western as she walked through The Outback on her way to work. She encountered a small cabin and was astonished to learn its connection to Doris Burn, as the cabin had once belonged to June and Farrar Burn, Doris Burn’s parents-in-law.

“My beginning started with a simple story of the need to create, to escape, to be understood and accepted.  And here I was, standing by the cabin which had belonged to the family of the woman whose life and creating influenced mine in ways I’m sure I can’t count.  I felt a sense of utter gratitude of how life can take a person full circle,” Krout explained.

Krout relayed this experience to some of the families of the CDC, and one of the parents later emailed her about a special exhibition featuring the work of Doris Burn that was on display at Western Libraries. As part of this exhibition, Doris Burn’s daughter, the local author and multi-dimensional artist Skye Burn, was scheduled to give a special public presentation about the life and legacy of her mother. Krout knew immediately she would attend this event, and following Skye’s talk, the two women finally met in person.

“What an honor to meet her daughter and to bask in the glow of creative genius,” said Krout. “How can I begin to even thank Doris and her family?”

Burn’s work continues to speak to readers of all ages, and since her death in 2011, Andrew Henry’s Meadow has been reissued by Penguin’s Philomel Books. The title has also been published and is presently available in translation in Korea, China and Japan.  Andrew Henry's Meadow won the Washington Governor's Art Award and was a Weekly Reader book club selection.

 “Plenty of Things to Do: The Work of Northwest Children’s Author Doris Burn,” will remain on display through March 10th, and is available for viewing weekdays Monday – Friday in Special Collections, (Wilson Library 6th Floor) between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.  Additionallydigital version of the Doris Burn exhibit is now available online, as are detailed collection guides to the Doris Burn Artwork and Manuscripts and related collections of June and Farrar Burn Papers and South Burn Papers, housed and available at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies

The pieces on display were selected from a far larger collection of Burn’s original works, which were donated to Western Libraries Heritage Resources in 2015 as a gift of the Burn Family via the Doris Burn Legacy LLC. These materials help document the cultural and artistic history of the Pacific Northwest region and were created by an artist and writer who sought specifically to engage with the needs, interests, and creativity of a younger audience.

Skye Burn’s talk, “The Strength of a Dream: A Daughter's Portrait of a Northwest Children's Author and Illustrator,” can be found in Western CEDAR and is viewable from this link.


Read more: Connecting Literature to Life


Campus History with Heritage Resources

Posted on: November 17, 2016

Topic(s): Newsletters

The Fall 2016 edition of Heritage Highlights is now available! In this issue we explore Western's 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.campus history, including a timeline of past presidents, the development of the university's physical and built environment, and recollections and reminiscences of former faculty and staff told through oral histories.

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives & Records Management.

Image: 620 High Street, circa 1950, University Archives.


Read more: Campus History with Heritage Resources


Summit to Salish Sea in Western CEDAR

Posted on: November 8, 2016

Topic(s): Updates, Feature Stories, Resources

New Journal Featuring the Work of WWU Huxley College Graduate Students

Open Access Week may be over, but we still have news to share of how Western is contributing to Open Access every single day. Did you know that Western’s Master Theses collection is the most highly-used collection in  Western CEDAR? And now the addition of a brand new journal, Summit to Salish Sea: Inquiries and Essays, demonstrates yet again how WWU graduate students are actively supporting Western’s commitment to enrich academic inquiry and strengthen communities by sharing their work in CEDAR.

This new journal, hosted by Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment and the North Cascades Institute, showcases the work of the students in the Masters of Environmental Education program. Articles are based on the final capstone presentations from the end of the graduate students’ programs, and cover a wide range of subjects related to environmental education.  Submissions in the journal are separated into two formats: speeches and essays, and some are enriched with multimedia.

“Currently, the journal is oriented around the theory and practice of environmental education with a focus on personal stories and revelations arising from teaching and study of the field,” explained journal founder and editor-in-chief, Nick Stanger. “Topics are as diverse as the student body, including forest-based schools, queer theory and environmental education.”

Graduate students from the M.Ed. residency program whose work is featured in S2SS: Inquiries and Essays / photo courtesy of Nick Stanger

 

Stanger is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Education in the Department Environmental Studies. He came to Western two years ago from the University of Victoria, where he recently received his doctoral degree examining transformative experiences and places. He decided to start this journal when he was searching for a way to document, celebrate, and share the tremendous work that his students put into their culminating projects, which are not finalized in the form of traditionally-defined theses. CEDAR seemed like a perfect fit for a number of reasons, including its capability to support a variety of content formats.

“CEDAR gives me the opportunity to include many of my students’ media, including audio, video, and still photographs,” explained Stanger. And as for what inspired the journal’s title? Recognizing the invaluable relationship between the environment and one’s own learning experiences, the title pays homage to both.  As described on the journal site:

 “The students' experience ranges from the summits of the North Cascades to the Salish Sea, a binational location, long recognized for its ecological and cultural diversity. Hosted within the traditional territories of many Coast Salish First Nations, this educational experience influences a rich inquiry into the nuances and complexities of environmental education. Whether students are tackling early childhood environmental education, environmental or education philosophy, or cultural explorations in education, their submissions represent a distinctly powerful Masters experience.”

Graduating students on the day of their capstone presentations ‘Passing the Paddle’ to the incoming cohort.

 

Western currently publishes two journals in CEDAR, (the other one being the Journal of Educational Controversy, hosted by Woodring College), with anticipated growth in this area in the near future. Part of a global movement promoting access to scholarship and creative works, Western CEDAR (an acronym for Contributing to Education through Digital Access to Research) officially launched in the fall of 2014,  as a service of Western Libraries and in partnership with Western's Graduate School, Office of the Provost, and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

CEDAR serves as a platform to disseminate and promote the research, scholarship, and creative works of Western faculty, students, staff, departments, centers, units, institutes, and programs. There is a social-equity component to Open Access publishing that aligns nicely with the field of environmental education, as barriers which could prevent access to potentially beneficial information are removed, which means research and scholarship shared in CEDAR and created by students, faculty, and staff at Western are made freely available to everyone. By showcasing Western’s scholarly and creative works, CEDAR facilitates their global discovery and promotes sustainable scholarly communication.

“My students are very aware of the limitations of traditional publishing system - and with that - the limitations of environmental education and environmental justice as taught within a university setting,” explained Stanger. “This approach to including their voices within the landscape of environmental education and beyond is an enabling opportunity,” adding that their reactions to the journal have been very positive. 

“It has been surprisingly well-received by the students,” said Stanger. “I think it enhances the quality of their work, knowing that their documents will be seen beyond me and the audience that hears their work during the capstone.”

You can find the latest issue of Summit to Salish Sea: Inquiries and Essays, here:  http://cedar.wwu.edu/s2ss. While there is currently only one published volume available, Stanger is currently co-editing volume two, due out March 2017, with an alum from the program.

For more information about the M.Ed. in Environmental Education program, please see https://huxley.wwu.edu/med-environmental-education. Questions about Western CEDAR? Please contact westerncedar@wwu.edu.


Read more: Summit to Salish Sea in Western CEDAR


Welcome Sarah McDaniel

Posted on: August 10, 2016

Topic(s): Updates

Western Libraries Welcomes New Director of Teaching & Learning and the Learning Commons

Western Libraries at Western Washington University has hired Sarah McDaniel as the Director of Teaching & Learning and the Learning Commons. Sarah comes to Western from University of Wisconsin-Madison, where her recent work focused on partnerships to transform libraries’ educational roles.

In her new position as the Director of Teaching & Learning and the Learning Commons, Sarah will develop, implement, and assess an integrated teaching and learning program for Western Libraries that engages students and instructors from across the University. As a member of the Libraries’ senior leadership team, she will work collaboratively with librarians, staff, student employees, Learning Commons partners, and external stakeholders toward shared goals, and she will help advance new teaching and learning initiatives, including the online learning environment, student learning outcomes, and research-writing instruction in support of academic colleges’ curricula.

Sarah led the University of Wisconsin–Madison Libraries’ Teaching & Learning Programs for nine years. In addition to overseeing a twenty-library information literacy program, she expanded the scope of the program to incorporate faculty development and instructional design partnerships, secured campus funding for library e-learning initiatives, and co-chaired an Educational Innovation team focused on development of new service models. She also contributed to the leadership and facilitation of programs for early-career faculty, instructors involved in designing blended and online courses, and faculty visiting from partner universities outside the United States.

Sarah also worked in UW-Madison Provost’s Office, contributing to institutional efforts around accreditation and learning assessment. As consultant for a curricular redesign project in UW-Madison’s School of Library & Information Studies, she developed a communication plan for an upcoming name change for the school.  Sarah has also been Associate Lecturer for courses on pedagogy and learning assessment in the UW-Madison School of Library & Information Studies, and she partnered with the Chancellor’s Office, faculty, and campus and community organizations to found the “Go Big Read” campus-community reading program, now in its eighth year.  As a past Chair of both the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Instruction Section and the ACRL Divisional Committee on Information Literacy, Sarah developed ACRL’s formal liaison relationship with the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI).

Previously, Sarah was Humanities Librarian, Assessment & Instructional Design Librarian, and Interim Director of the Teaching Library at University of California–Berkeley. At Berkeley, Sarah was appointed Assessment Consultant for the Mellon Faculty Fellowship for Undergraduate Research, where she co-facilitated a year-long curriculum for faculty fellows, assessed the impact of the program on student learning, and consulted with faculty redesigning assignments and courses. Sarah also partnered with Berkeley’s Graduate Student Instructor Teaching & Resource Center to develop programs on research-based learning for future faculty. Sarah’s academic credentials include a Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS), a M.A. in Foreign Languages and Literatures (French) from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a B.A. in French from UW-Madison. 


Read more: Welcome Sarah McDaniel


Subscriptions Review Update

Posted on: June 14, 2016

Topic(s): Updates

Subscriptions Reduction Review Process - Update

As part of the Subscriptions Reduction Review process, Western Libraries has finalized the list of subscription cancellations. More information about this process and the list can be found here: http://www.library.wwu.edu/sites/libraryprod7x900.wwu.edu/files/satf/final-list-of-subscription-cancellations-memo-june-2016.pdf
 
Subscription cancellations will not take effect until January 1, 2017. There will be no disruption to cancelled subscriptions during summer and fall quarters. Beginning in winter quarter, content from cancelled journals will be accessible via interlibrary loan request.  The Libraries strives to deliver an electronic copy of desired items to a patron’s email account within a day or two of request.
 
If you have any questions about the subscription reduction review process, please contact Director of Scholarly Resources and Collection Services at Mike.Olson@wwu.edu.

Read more: Subscriptions Review Update


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